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Posted: 10/27/2013 7:32:14 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/27/2013 7:34:27 AM EST by Shung]
.. These are available ?



I cook them several times a week while they are in store :) !

Is it something commonly found in the USA or absolutely not ? 10min in the oven with some water to steam them a little.... Mmmmmm

Ps: don't forget to put a little cut in them before or they will kaboom like a glock
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:37:26 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/27/2013 7:38:04 AM EST by rustybelly]
Jeff's nuts roasting on an open fire, Jack Frost nipping at your balls!!

Nope, never had 'em.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:40:46 AM EST
I trip over thousands of those daily while working...never picked one up, but the squirrels are very zealous about protecting them!
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:44:11 AM EST
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Originally Posted By muddawggin:
I trip over thousands of those daily while working...never picked one up, but the squirrels are very zealous about protecting them!
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You really should try them !
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:48:31 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/27/2013 7:49:33 AM EST by Dipper]
I have been eating chestnuts all my life and love them.

My grandmother always cooked them when in season.

I roast them on top of the stove in a pie pan...... never in the oven with water. You want to get a little color on them and toast them.

Can't count the number of times we sat around eating them with a good wine...... I miss my grandfathers wine.

Never cut them and hardly ever had any blow.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:50:00 AM EST
I love em but can't seem to find good ones way out here in the desert.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:53:03 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/27/2013 7:53:48 AM EST by Shung]
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Originally Posted By Dipper:
I have been eating chestnuts all my life and love them.

My grandmother always cooked them when in season.

I roast them on top of the stove in a pie pan...... never in the oven with water. You want to get a little color on them and toast them.

Can't count the number of times we sat around eating them with a good wine...... I miss my grandfathers wine.

Never cut them and hardly ever had any blow.
View Quote


Of course, yours is the best way if you can. But most people don't have a stove, that's the best alternative way. The water is to be put in the oven, but not in contact with the chestnuts. It's just that the steam produced helps not drying'em out while cooking.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:53:49 AM EST
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Originally Posted By rustybelly:
Jeff's nuts roasting on an open fire, Jack Frost nipping at your balls!!

Nope, never had 'em.
View Quote


Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:56:54 AM EST
There was this chess tournament in town recently. They were gathered at a local 5 star hotel, in the lobby. They were all bragging about their prowess on the table, each one recalling their most famous moves. The manager got up and exclaimed "I'm tired of chess nuts boasting in an open foyer".
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:58:28 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Keith_J:
There was this chess tournament in town recently. They were gathered at a local 5 star hotel, in the lobby. They were all bragging about their prowess on the table, each one recalling their most famous moves. The manager got up and exclaimed "I'm tired of chess nuts boasting in an open foyer".
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Link Posted: 10/27/2013 8:19:01 AM EST
Never had em. Chestnuts arent exactly common around here....


But i do love roasted pecans!!!!
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 9:29:20 AM EST
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Originally Posted By BladedRonin:
Never had em. Chestnuts arent exactly common around here....


But i do love roasted pecans!!!!
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Try em ! You won't regret it
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 9:49:57 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Shung:


Of course, yours is the best way if you can. But most people don't have a stove, that's the best alternative way. The water is to be put in the oven, but not in contact with the chestnuts. It's just that the steam produced helps not drying'em out while cooking.
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Originally Posted By Shung:
Originally Posted By Dipper:
I have been eating chestnuts all my life and love them.

My grandmother always cooked them when in season.

I roast them on top of the stove in a pie pan...... never in the oven with water. You want to get a little color on them and toast them.

Can't count the number of times we sat around eating them with a good wine...... I miss my grandfathers wine.

Never cut them and hardly ever had any blow.


Of course, yours is the best way if you can. But most people don't have a stove, that's the best alternative way. The water is to be put in the oven, but not in contact with the chestnuts. It's just that the steam produced helps not drying'em out while cooking.

Wait, stoves aren't common in Switzerland?
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 9:59:15 AM EST
Had them last year, my first time. Not bad, not great. Maybe just because of never doing it before.

We cooked them on a grill. They never came out like on your pic. Ours took some work after they popped. Mostly got little pieces. tried not to over heat.

Maybe we will try again. Good reason to drink in a machine shed in winter trying new cooking stuff. Plenty of ventilation going through machine shed.

Not going to die due to gassing.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 10:38:15 AM EST
standard NYC street food Christmas time
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 10:42:00 AM EST
As far as I knew, growing up in Iowa, they are not indigenous to that state. Nor, have I ever seen any in Colorado.

I honestly believe your pics are the first time I've ever seen chestnuts.

Gotta get out more, I guess.

Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:00:31 PM EST
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Originally Posted By retgarr:

Wait, stoves aren't common in Switzerland?
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Originally Posted By retgarr:
Originally Posted By Shung:
Originally Posted By Dipper:
I have been eating chestnuts all my life and love them.

My grandmother always cooked them when in season.

I roast them on top of the stove in a pie pan...... never in the oven with water. You want to get a little color on them and toast them.

Can't count the number of times we sat around eating them with a good wine...... I miss my grandfathers wine.

Never cut them and hardly ever had any blow.


Of course, yours is the best way if you can. But most people don't have a stove, that's the best alternative way. The water is to be put in the oven, but not in contact with the chestnuts. It's just that the steam produced helps not drying'em out while cooking.

Wait, stoves aren't common in Switzerland?


maybe I didnt understand the word stove.. is a stove only going with wood, or it can be electric or propane ?
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:02:24 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bailagent100:
As far as I knew, growing up in Iowa, they are not indigenous to that state. Nor, have I ever seen any in Colorado.

I honestly believe your pics are the first time I've ever seen chestnuts.

Gotta get out more, I guess.

View Quote


strange. trees only grows above a certain altitude. I would have guessed colorado lowlands being perfect for that. but maybe they are not indigenous in the USA, I dont know
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:03:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/27/2013 2:04:33 PM EST by MILLERLGT82]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shung:


maybe I didnt understand the word stove.. is a stove only going with wood, or it can be electric or propane ?
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shung:
Originally Posted By retgarr:
Originally Posted By Shung:
Originally Posted By Dipper:
I have been eating chestnuts all my life and love them.

My grandmother always cooked them when in season.

I roast them on top of the stove in a pie pan...... never in the oven with water. You want to get a little color on them and toast them.

Can't count the number of times we sat around eating them with a good wine...... I miss my grandfathers wine.

Never cut them and hardly ever had any blow.


Of course, yours is the best way if you can. But most people don't have a stove, that's the best alternative way. The water is to be put in the oven, but not in contact with the chestnuts. It's just that the steam produced helps not drying'em out while cooking.

Wait, stoves aren't common in Switzerland?


maybe I didnt understand the word stove.. is a stove only going with wood, or it can be electric or propane ?



Gas,electric and wood


And thanks for the reminder, I need to go out and get some and cook them up
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:06:36 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shung:


strange. trees only grows above a certain altitude. I would have guessed colorado lowlands being perfect for that. but maybe they are not indigenous in the USA, I dont know
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Originally Posted By Shung:
Originally Posted By bailagent100:
As far as I knew, growing up in Iowa, they are not indigenous to that state. Nor, have I ever seen any in Colorado.

I honestly believe your pics are the first time I've ever seen chestnuts.

Gotta get out more, I guess.



strange. trees only grows above a certain altitude. I would have guessed colorado lowlands being perfect for that. but maybe they are not indigenous in the USA, I dont know



A century ago a blight virtually wiped out the eastern US's entire population of chestnuts. Now the only thing growing are European/Asian/American hybrids, and a few select American trees that appear to be resistant to the blight.

Restoring these populations is a big business. We're planting some hybrids on our place this winter. But, in short, yes, chestnuts are rare in the eastern US now.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:07:19 PM EST
Is that some of the new swiss cuisine I'll get to eat when I move over yonder?
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:08:20 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shung:


strange. trees only grows above a certain altitude. I would have guessed colorado lowlands being perfect for that. but maybe they are not indigenous in the USA, I dont know
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Originally Posted By Shung:
Originally Posted By bailagent100:
As far as I knew, growing up in Iowa, they are not indigenous to that state. Nor, have I ever seen any in Colorado.

I honestly believe your pics are the first time I've ever seen chestnuts.

Gotta get out more, I guess.



strange. trees only grows above a certain altitude. I would have guessed colorado lowlands being perfect for that. but maybe they are not indigenous in the USA, I dont know

If only we had the ultimate resource for information at our fingertips.

American Chestnut is as American as pie.

Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:14:38 PM EST
Yes, I've had them. Yes, they are good stuff.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:21:12 PM EST
I love 'em raw.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:27:22 PM EST
Yes, very good!
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:43:45 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shung:


strange. trees only grows above a certain altitude. I would have guessed colorado lowlands being perfect for that. but maybe they are not indigenous in the USA, I dont know
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shung:
Originally Posted By bailagent100:
As far as I knew, growing up in Iowa, they are not indigenous to that state. Nor, have I ever seen any in Colorado.

I honestly believe your pics are the first time I've ever seen chestnuts.

Gotta get out more, I guess.



strange. trees only grows above a certain altitude. I would have guessed colorado lowlands being perfect for that. but maybe they are not indigenous in the USA, I dont know

I've seen them at over 1,000ft and around sea level.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:53:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/27/2013 2:54:45 PM EST by MAGICmaker]

Chestnuts are an Italian thing. Put a cut in the shell and steam them in a covered cast iron skillet with a cup of water on high heat till the skin starts to curl and the water evaporates. Then roast them in the dry skillet till you get a scorch mark on each side. A unique flavor and texture. Try Italian Import stores and High End Grocers during December.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 10:47:07 PM EST
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Originally Posted By MAGICmaker:

Chestnuts are an Italian thing. Put a cut in the shell and steam them in a covered cast iron skillet with a cup of water on high heat till the skin starts to curl and the water evaporates. Then roast them in the dry skillet till you get a scorch mark on each side. A unique flavor and texture. Try Italian Import stores and High End Grocers during December.
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Greece too. It seems like there's a street vendor on every street in Athens roasting them on his pushcart.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:43:23 AM EST
Ha, I'm glad my father will be able to have them in the USA when he retires
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