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Posted: 10/19/2009 5:05:20 PM EDT
Do you have a pilots license?
Is it worth it? Specifically if you don't fly for a living?

I have always wanted to fly but, dang, it is expensive.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:09:42 PM EDT
CFI-I single/multi-engine land.

Its very worth it. Get your license, buy a small plane. have fun.

PS its expensive fun.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:12:38 PM EDT
Originally Posted By regalrocket:
CFI-I single/multi-engine land.

Its very worth it. Get your license, buy a small plane. have fun.

PS its expensive fun.


Tell me about it.  Back when I learned, wet time on a 172 was $35/hr, and that was a tach hour.  These days it's more like $100/hr.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:16:03 PM EDT
I have a Boeing 737 Type rating.  Paid 8 grand for it right before i retired.  Thought i wanted to drive a bus (airlines) when I retired.  But got a nice contractor job teaching young NATO fighter pilots how to fly.  I am home every evening and weekend

Is getting your pilots license worth it.  Its up to you.  Go to you local airport and see if you like flying in bug  smashers at 100 kts.  If yo enjoy it, go for it, then you can get your buds to chip in for the plane.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:17:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/19/2009 5:18:07 PM EDT by dramsey2k4]
<< Student ticket





ETA: expensive, but definitely worth it. and you can write it all off as school on your taxes.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:18:36 PM EDT
Have my single engine license, use to have my tailwheel endorsement but I let that lapse.

It's fun but as others have said, expensive.  I would say it's worth it.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:19:36 PM EDT
I have one, but haven't been able to actually go up for two years because I'm broke.

Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:19:40 PM EDT
Single engine, land
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:20:27 PM EDT
No.  It is very expensive, things are always breaking, seems like you need to update your medical all the time, affordable plane time (SEL 20-30 years old) is still 125/hr wet  (add 70 for instructor) and flying around the pattern isn't too much fun.  Airspace is congested and did I mention it's expensive?
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:22:26 PM EDT
Single engine land, instrument rated.

Had fun learning, spent a buncha money on it.  Great feeling of accomplishment, but too expensive to keep up with it for me.



Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:24:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/19/2009 5:25:15 PM EDT by MSC182]
Earning your Private Pilot Certificate is one of the most fun and rewarding things you can do.  Having said that, it is expensive.  One other thing to add is a lot of people underestimate the amount of work that goes into it.

ETA: Single Engine Land-125 TT-Haven't flown in several years due to finances.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:24:50 PM EDT
Commercial Single/Multi Engine Land w/Instrument plus CFI, MEI.  No CFII or ATP.  I'm no longer flying for a living.

Yes it's worth it.  The PPL is a great thing to have and once you have it, you always will.  (Provided you are BFR current and have a valid medical cert.)

The prices are only going to keep going up.  Lawsuits are more and more prevalent, thus insurance will keep rising.  Fuel costs are on the long term rise as well.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:26:56 PM EDT
i started towards it but, haven't flown in 2 yrs.  I really want to get back into it, but can't afford it right now.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:28:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By JI603:
No.  It is very expensive, things are always breaking, seems like you need to update your medical all the time, affordable plane time (SEL 20-30 years old) is still 125/hr wet  (add 70 for instructor) and flying around the pattern isn't too much fun.  Airspace is congested and did I mention it's expensive?




Every 60 months for 3rd class medical for younger guys.  That works out to be about $20/year.

$70 for an instructor?  Who's yours, Rod Machado?!  I charge 35/hr in your plane.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:28:38 PM EDT
Student ticket,, pre-solo

yes it's expensive but if after a few lessons you decide it's not for you, you're not out much.

Give it a try
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:30:05 PM EDT
I've got one. And it being "worth it" is subjective. I've wanted to fly since I was three, so this is fulfilling a lifetime imperative. VERY worth it.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:34:25 PM EDT
Not exactly current but got the private license and lived through all the stupid crap I tried when I was young and crazy.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:35:00 PM EDT
If you do it, make sure you have the cash and time to take lessons on a regular basis. The longer you drag it out, the more money you will spend and the greater the chance you will give up.  It's a lot of fun, challenging, and rewarding. If you can swing it, go for it.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:36:43 PM EDT
Private and Instrument, 200 hrs total time. Havent flown in about 10 months.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:37:45 PM EDT
Sport Pilot and Ultralights are cheaper and as safe as you make it.

Some will ridicule but it's usually those who value "pilot" prestige more than the act of flight itself.

We're lucky to live in a country with such freedoms...
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:37:48 PM EDT
Airplane, Single Engine Land  for 29 years.
Took lessons on Saturday mornings while I was going to college after I got out of the Army and quit jumping out of airplanes.
It's worth it if you're an airplane nut.
_______________________________
I've owned a small plane for about 7 yrs.
It's worth it if you fly it.  If you are casually flying, then rent.
I fly RC planes as well.
I never outgrew my boyhood love for airplanes
.








Did I mention that I love airplanes.  





 
 
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:37:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/19/2009 5:39:23 PM EDT by EarlBypass]
Private, Single Engine Land and  Glider Unrestricted.  Got my ticket through the Navy Flying Club.  Paid $34.00/hr for a wet T-34B... split the cost with adventurous passengers.  Got my Glider rating in Hawaii at Dillingham.  Yes, it does cost some money, it does take time, and you will never regret it.






 
 
 
 

 
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:39:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/19/2009 5:40:50 PM EDT by GilenusX207]
One day I'll go back and finish what I started.  School got in the way but those flight lessons are some of my best memories, solo being tops among them of course.  Hell, I was content just to fly around in the pattern if that's all that was planned.








Do it.  If after the first lesson you're not hooked, something ain't right upstairs.

 
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:39:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/19/2009 5:40:51 PM EDT by Primos]
Commercial single and multi, instrument, here.  Ran out of money for CFI (took me an entire year to save up enough for the multi add on to my commercial), trying to figure out where to go from here, having a hell of a time finding a job in aviation (duh).
Still love flying though.  There's nowhere else I'd rather be than in one of those seats.

Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:48:51 PM EDT
Most private pilots fly for a while and then stop.  Is it worth it for the memories and to check off your life's list?  Only you can say for  sure.

Take a few lessons and see where your priorities lie.

The biggest question is: How much money do you have?    Tell me your disposable income, and I'll tell you if it's "worth it"
 

Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:49:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/19/2009 5:50:06 PM EDT by Guess]
I got my Single Engine Land at 19.  It was $35/hr with fuel.  $15 with instructor.  Very much worth it. I'll never forget going up solo for the first time.

Link Posted: 10/19/2009 5:59:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/19/2009 6:07:55 PM EDT by eric496]
A few years back I bought a Cessna150 and got my license. Owning a plane by yourself is expensive. When something breaks it is going to cost you. If you have a busy schedule, it just sits there costing money. And sitting for extended periods of time is bad for planes.

Two years ago I sold it and bought into a small club that owns a beautifully equipped 172M. Unless you plan to fly almost every weekend, shared ownership is the way to go. Now I pay $70.00 per month and $35.00 dry for a fast plane with 4 seats. Monthly dues include the first hour. And, I was up around $100 per hour with my old 150 (two seats and not as fast or as nicely equipped) because I didn't have much time to fly.  

Is it expensive? Yes. Is it worth it? Hell yes!

What would I do if starting over? Take a few lessons and decide it is really what I want to do. Then take a week or two off and fly every day. Flying once a week is not enough when preparing for your PPL.

Go for it! Good luck!

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:09:34 PM EDT
Yes I do.
Is it worth it?  Well that's for you to decide, because it is VERY expensive.
I can only justify the expense by building and flying my own aircraft as a hobby.
I enjoy aerobatics and most "Wichita wobble wings" wont do it.
But leaving terra firma in an aircraft by yourself for the first time is something you will never forget!
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:12:46 PM EDT
Working on it.

Logbook only has .7 of nosewheel time in it.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:17:22 PM EDT
Commercial Single and Multi-Engine Land, Instrument Airplane
All the rental aircraft nearby have been sold. I haven't flown in some time. I keep up on MS Flight Sim X, though I don't think my virtual MD-11 handling skills will translate into a job offer for FedEx
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:17:38 PM EDT
$70-100 bucks an hour...you guys think this is the expensive part?

The expensive part is when you get all the ratings, start flying for a living, and start collecting ex-wives...
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:18:12 PM EDT
Single engine land.  I think I left off with 120 hours, was halfway or more done toward my instrument rating.



Yea, it was expensive which is one of the reasons I don't do it anymore.



I'd like to take some helicopter lessons...someday
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:18:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/21/2009 7:21:00 PM EDT by bigstatik]
I am 20 hrs in towards getting mine.



UPDATE: soloed today with 21.2 hours  10/21/09 :)

Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:19:05 PM EDT
I have my helicopter Commercial and CFI, and I currently work as an instructor.    

As for whether or not it's worth it, that's really up to you.  Some people just really love to fly, and there is a lot of freedom in the air.  Some people like the 'idea' of flying more than the reality of it.  
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:20:40 PM EDT
I don't.

Just an ATP
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:20:51 PM EDT
Yes..

PPSEL.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:21:04 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MadnessReigns:
Single engine land.  I think I left off with 120 hours, was halfway or more done toward my instrument rating.

Yea, it was expensive which is one of the reasons I don't do it anymore.

I'd like to take some helicopter lessons...someday


If you think flying airplanes are expensive, wait till you get bit by the 'copter bug.  
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:23:12 PM EDT
I got my private in 1984, on my 17th birthday, I had to give it up on my 18th birthday, when I got my commercial.

Now I hold an ATP, CFII/MEI, and five type ratings.

It's been over 15 years since I've flown a small airplane.  I can't afford it.  And honestly, the last thing I want to do on my days off is go flying.

But it was great fun, and I wouldn't trade most of the experiences for anything.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:23:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/19/2009 6:25:48 PM EDT by ti8589]
DONT DO IT,

you think cops are bad to deal with wait until you meet the FAA / ATC system

get into ultra-lights if your are interested in flying for fun.  Cheaper, much less regulations, same basic concept.

and yes I am a fully rated pilot (ATP) / instructor (MEII) and i have already forgot my first solo, its really not that big of a deal like people make it out to be.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:26:53 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Mach:
I don't.

Just an ATP


But do you still have a job (that involves flying) and if you do - is it a fun job anymore?

Actually, I'm just kidding, but I would like to know....
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:31:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Mach:
I don't.

Just an ATP


Showoff.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:36:56 PM EDT
I have my private and I own a 40 year old Cessna. It's worth it. As mentioned above, it's one of the most rewarding things I have ever done. However, renting really sucks and will bring an end to your flying happiness very rapidly.

Having an aircraft is really an interesting experience. at 160MPH, I can fly to places I would normally drive, generally in 1/2 to 1/4 the time (depending on distance and terrain). No worries about speeding tickets, traffic, other drivers or other highway related issues. Plenty of concern about weather, mechanical safety and how much you can carry along, not to mention my dodgy flying skills.

The private pilot flying experience is something that can only be done in a few countries. And the USA is unique in aviation culture and cost. Sure, you can do it in Europe (if you are a millionaire) and don't mind excessive restriction.

It's not for everybody, but for those who like aviation, it becomes a life long passion. However, my personal take on flying is that it must be used for travel. Just flying around the local airports gets expensive and boring.

Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:38:32 PM EDT
About 600 hours Commercial, SE, Land, instrument rating...very little time in twins and helicopters
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:41:44 PM EDT
i'm in flight school for the Army (i start the blackhawk course in 2 days) and will come out of here with a commercial instrument rotary wing rating, but i plan on working on my fixed wing civilian ratings when i get out of here. i love flying helos, they're just too damn expensive for my blood. i'll make the Army pay for my gas for the time being.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:41:56 PM EDT
No, but always wanted to get it and fly amphibs or helos.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:42:00 PM EDT
Every day I go to work I want to get mine more and more

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:44:34 PM EDT
Spin training was the biggest hurdle for me, not that I didn't catch on right away, but the apprehension leading up to it was kind of like losing your virginity when you expected to lay in splendor after you are finished.

Two practice stalls, rehearse(sp) the HALT check, set up and enter the stall, nose up power off, full left rudder and full stick back..all hell breaks loose...center controls, full right rudder, arrest the spin, neutral rudder and pull the nose up...DO NOT ad power until the nose is above the horizon.

And do it again.

From that day forward, I have NEVER experienced a high like that....that day I really learned to fly.

'nuff said.


It's worth every penny.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:45:37 PM EDT
Originally Posted By cujet:
I have my private and I own a 40 year old Cessna. It's worth it. As mentioned above, it's one of the most rewarding things I have ever done. However, renting really sucks and will bring an end to your flying happiness very rapidly.

Having an aircraft is really an interesting experience. at 160MPH, I can fly to places I would normally drive, generally in 1/2 to 1/4 the time (depending on distance and terrain). No worries about speeding tickets, traffic, other drivers or other highway related issues. Plenty of concern about weather, mechanical safety and how much you can carry along, not to mention my dodgy flying skills.

The private pilot flying experience is something that can only be done in a few countries. And the USA is unique in aviation culture and cost. Sure, you can do it in Europe (if you are a millionaire) and don't mind excessive restriction.

It's not for everybody, but for those who like aviation, it becomes a life long passion. However, my personal take on flying is that it must be used for travel. Just flying around the local airports gets expensive and boring.

http://www.cujet.com/assets/images/DSCN3091_resize.jpg


Ohhh, that's a nice Cardinal.

Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:46:07 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ti8589:
DONT DO IT,

you think cops are bad to deal with wait until you meet the FAA / ATC system



True, however, the risk/reward ratio is favorable in aviation. Where as it's not on the highway. In other words, you can operate an aircraft outside of controlled airspace, never talk to anybody and maintain your "paperwork" properly. Your risk of enforcement problems is greatly reduced.

Example: You experience a ramp check from some nasty FAA employee. Just what are you required to disclose? Must you allow access to your aircraft? Must you show your logbook? The answer is no. You must show your certificate, your medical (maybe your glasses) and your registration/airworthiness certificate. If those are in order, your risk of problems is near zero.

For example: If you are not on a "flight plan" and not under ATC control, you generally cannot bust an altitude. Sure, there are exceptions.

Many private pilots have gotten the message. They avoid ATC and controlled airspace, and restricted areas like the plague. It's total freedom within those guidelines.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:47:47 PM EDT
Do it. Also, if you're in business for yourself, it's *very* good for business. Being a pilot will often give you extra points when trying to get contracts...it will also get you laid.
Link Posted: 10/19/2009 6:55:34 PM EDT
Yep. I've flown a few different aircraft and I loved every hour in them.

The best times were in a little Super Cub in Colorado an a mountain checkout in a C182 in Colorado.

The worst was when the Archer that I was flying back from OK coughed and sputtered a few times... Not cool....

The funniest (now not then) was when I shot my first ILS under the hood. I nailed the glide slope and localizer. I mean the needles never budged. We (instructor was there but not) flew down the glide slope like PRO-fessiounals. I was so proud of myself. All that time on Flight Simulator had really paid off... then the radio came alive... just inside the middle marker.... the tower wanted to know what our intentions were. I looked at my instructor and confidently asked him WTF  do they mean... we're going to land! That's when he started cross checking the instruments... like I was supposed to have done. The localizer and glide slope were dead... the altimeter and VSI were working great. They showed us in level flight about 2,000 above the glide slope Off came the hood, off came the power, the instructor canceled IFR,  told them we were landing on ?? right (oh no... I couldn't do this at some podunk aero-puerto... I had to do it at one with parallel runways and other people listening). No power, full flaps, hard on the rudder, roll in some aileron and slip right on down to a beautiful mid-runway landing with just enough room to roll out and taxi alllll the way back to the FBO

I sat in the right seat of a Lear 25 once but I wasn't too interested in flying it. Too much going on too quickly and besides that the guy in the left seat almost crapped himself when the chief pilot told him to let me fly if I wanted to. We were cruising at FL4xx (near the service ceiling) and we were skipping through the dew with a real nice tail wind. I told the FO that I was good just sitting there and letting the AP do all of the work. When we dropped off the big boys in OK we flew into Denver. I got to sit in the jump seat and watch them shoot an ILS to minimums in a snowstorm... awesome... for me... they worked their asses off...
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