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Posted: 7/19/2008 5:26:31 AM EDT
Having graduated from college in December of 2007 and entered the workforce full-time in March 2008, I find that I am not really being adversely affected by the poor economy, housing crisis, oil price skyrocketing, etc etc. Sure, I pay a little more for gas than I am used to, but I don't find it crimping my pocketbook. Here's why I feel very economically comfortable at the moment:

-I rent instead of own a house, so no worries about property tax and loan issues.

-I am ridiculously frugal with my utilities. I pay $40 a month for power and nothing for heating, because I turn my heat off completely when it's not the winter. My biggest splurge is for cable.

-I live 3 miles from work, so I drive 6 miles a day, 30 miles a week, that's it. If gas became $20/gallon (or some number where I couldn't afford it) I could just walk to work.

-I spend $50/week on groceries, tops. I eat comfortably (albeit basic food, nothing fancy).

What about y'all?
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:33:30 AM EDT
No problems here...probably won't unless something real bad happens with the economy, which I doubt will.

Yeah, I've gotta spend a few extra bucks a month on gas. I just eat less fast food for lunch and take my own lunch to work instead...need to eat healthier anyway, so it's a win win.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:34:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 5:36:22 AM EDT by sherrick13]
Not affected much here.


Smart decisions= not having to worry.

Don't accrue debt. (NEVER buy on credit) EXCEPT....

for a mortagage and then your payment should not be more than 30% of takehome.

No car payment.

Live close to work.

Don't have kids you can't afford.

Build an emergency fund of six months expenses.

Be willing to work hard, show up on time and work in a place you might not want to for a while.

Follow those rules and a recession won't touch you.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:35:59 AM EDT
We are all absolutely seeing the effects of the economy. Wanna take a road trip to see family or friends, it now costs twice what it used to. Have a dinner party about 15% more and on and on and on.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:36:46 AM EDT
We no longer live in an age where you secure a good union job in your early 20s, work there until retirement, and then enjoy a nice pension until you die. The people who still expect that are the ones hardest hit by recessions.

Nowadays you have to hustle. If you're continuously networking, earning new licenses, furthering your education, and not going to extremes to piss off your boss (thereby ensuring you're the first to be laid off) you'll be able to weather anything short of civil breakdown.

Oh yeah, having some basic financial good sense helps too. As always, the first to be hurt are the people who can't adapt.

Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:37:16 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:39:21 AM EDT
As far as I go, I'm doing fine. I'm lucky though, my full time gig is in public Saftey and my off-duty job is in terrisom responce so it's pretty secure. As far as wife goes the busness that she ownes is showing a slow down. She's a wedding photographer and she's a bit off from last year.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:42:22 AM EDT
No recession here....praise God!

34 yrs old and have been my own boss for the last six years...historically, summers have been our slowest time of year....this year has been our busiest ever, go figure...

No CC debt

No car payments

50% equity in home, with mortgage payment less than 10% of take home pay

Beautiful wife and two kids...life is good.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:44:09 AM EDT
Things are tight, but not unmanageable.

I carpool with 2 co-workers to save on gas.

We don't cool the house to crypt-like levels.

We watch our spending very closely aka wants vs needs.

I work every minute of overtime I can get to make things easier. That is "extra" money that has nothing to do with the budget. It goes to pay things down/off. It is cyclical, so it can't be figured into the regular budget.


We are still raising kids and have one in college, so we have stuff to pay for, but we are making it.

I work one of those union jobs that I started in my early 20's (public transportation....we do well when the economy is shaky and fuel prices are high) and am less than 10 years from retirement.

Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:47:46 AM EDT
Not affected in the least. I'm in one of those rare jobs where it's actually better for me when the rest of the economy sucks. My job security and mediocre pay looks pretty good when the unemployment rate starts to climb. The more prices come down on houses, and people sell of their toys because they can't afford their debt, the better off I am.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:49:23 AM EDT
Not here. Wife, two kids, no debt except mortgage ($535/month) with 75% equity.

Retirement plans have been hit, but I do not plan on touching it so I can ignore it.

9 months of living expenses in the bank for emergencies, and I keep about 2 months food on hand.

I am 38.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:51:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 5:52:14 AM EDT by whoanelly]

Originally Posted By CletusRoundbelly:

I work one of those union jobs that I started in my early 20's (public transportation....we do well when the economy is shaky and fuel prices are high) and am less than 10 years from retirement.



I was referencing the Detroit autoworker unions more than .gov, .gov union jobs are the last holdouts...although my state pension from my 7 years in corrections has a crappy inflation adjustment clause, and will only pay for a monthly case of beer when I actually start to collect it in 23 years. Bastards.

Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:51:54 AM EDT
I just started a new job in June that pays 78% more.

While it is 100 miles round trip, the high price of gas means fewer cars on the
road to contend with.

I locked into a 6% mortgage on a price I thought was good.

The only down side is that crime is up,
and my state will put me in prison if I
defend myself during a robbery.

Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:53:33 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:54:00 AM EDT
Today's poor economy has definitely had a effect on me. I manage a truck accessory shop around Orlando and business has been off 50-60% for the last year and 6 months, and is only getting worse. People are seeing the doom and gloom on the news every night and it scares them into saving money instead of spending it.

Now some things I sell are "necessities" like steps to get into a vehicle and different kinds of tops for the back of truck but the smaller "wants" have fallen off sharply.

As someone who is commissioned off of the stores profit, this translated into a $15K pay cut last year. I would say that hurts quite a bit since the most I made at this shop was $52K in one year.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:58:15 AM EDT
I'm doing ok. My house payment can be covered with two days pay. Gas is a little bit painful but only because I can remember buying .69 per gallon gas for my first vehicle.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:58:28 AM EDT
Everyone is being affected by rising gas and food prices. It's just a matter of how much. I drive 100 miles a day and have a wife and 3 kids to support so it sucks for me. I could be investing the extra money I now pay for gas and food. Having a good job, no debt other than a 1k mortgage payment, and car pooling has helped a lot though.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 6:01:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By roboman:
Having graduated from college in December of 2007 and entered the workforce full-time in March 2008, I find that I am not really being adversely affected by the poor economy, housing crisis, oil price skyrocketing, etc etc. Sure, I pay a little more for gas than I am used to, but I don't find it crimping my pocketbook. Here's why I feel very economically comfortable at the moment:
Well no shit, junior. You've been in the work force for what, four months? I also notice you don't say what you do.

-I rent instead of own a house, so no worries about property tax and loan issues.
Oh, just wait till your landlord gets a 40% property tax increase like some of the folks around here got. You'll notice when your rent goes up, trust me.

-I am ridiculously frugal with my utilities. I pay $40 a month for power and nothing for heating, because I turn my heat off completely when it's not the winter. My biggest splurge is for cable.
Last I looked, Winter will follow Fall just like it does every year. It'll be along, no doubt, and you'll notice a difference then.

-I live 3 miles from work, so I drive 6 miles a day, 30 miles a week, that's it. If gas became $20/gallon (or some number where I couldn't afford it) I could just walk to work.
OK, good for you. I'm looking forward to your report of walking three miles to work in a snowstorm. You are very fortunate to live so close to work. Those of us who don't live so close to work are somewhat more impacted. Suppose you got transferred to another facility thirty miles away. Would the price of gas affect you then?

-I spend $50/week on groceries, tops. I eat comfortably (albeit basic food, nothing fancy).
A single guy living by himself? I would expect that amount. This is really hitting the families the most.

What about y'all?


So, to sum up: You are a 22-ish y.o. guy, college grad, living alone, own no real property, no kids, no obligations (except, maybe some student loans?). Congratulations. You represent about .001 percent of the US population. The rest of us, those with families, real property, etc see things in a different light.
Do you ever hope to own a home or start a family? Maybe invest for your retirement? Then this stuff does affect you, you just aren't seeing it yet.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 6:02:43 AM EDT
Well, my dad's programming contract just ran out a few weeks ago, but he was given a new contract, in a higher position, several years longer.

I'm in Iraq sitting in front of a computer for 84 hours a week, so I'm unaffected currently.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 6:05:12 AM EDT
I have been out of work for almost 3 months. My industry is really in the shitter right now and there isn't much out there for work so I am looking into other possibilities.

Fortunately, I have some cash saved up and very little debt other than what I owe on my house, however, raising my 2 children is costing me an arm and a leg.

Hopefully I will be working again in the next few weeks max or I will be big time Fugged.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 6:18:04 AM EDT
Law firms are seeing a slowdown in work. Megafirms have started cutting associates and staff because of lack of work.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 6:18:33 AM EDT

Originally Posted By peekay:
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 6:18:40 AM EDT
Couple of months until 30, no kids (yet), zero savings/investments, not paycheck-to-paycheck but definately not comfortable.

My wife's working 2 jobs PT and halfway through school, I work 50-70 hrs/wk depending on available OT, all revolving debt paid off except 1 car payment and 1 credit card, and the latter will be paid off by the end of the year.

Work truck w/ gas card = very little spent on gas, food is a bit of a pinch (not that it really "hurts", just "damn lunch is $10 wtf?!") but brown-bagging it helps.

Looking to save up 3mo pay, get up to speed on my 401K contributions, and save up for a downpayment on a house.

Acc. to ARFcom this is but a simple matter, but a 20% downpayment is gonna take quite a bit of eating Ramen.

I'm heading back to school Aug '09 after wife graduates and the Post 9/11 GI Bill kicks in.

We have a low quality of life right now with our school/work hours, but bills are getting paid, roof over head, we're fed, and we're accomplishing educational and financial goals.

Link Posted: 7/19/2008 6:37:51 AM EDT
Haven't had any issues either. I have a job in the water heating industry and don't see sales slowing down. Unless S really hits the F, people aren';'t going to go without hot water. I have not missed a day of work or been late in over 7 years so i'm on pretty solid ground there as well.

Last year i started my own business on the side keeping up with rental properties and i now have 47 places so that's going really good too. I consider myself very lucky and do see some folks I know going through hard times (trucking industry).
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 6:45:56 AM EDT
I'm doing ok, but I could be a lot better. My line of work is suffering for the costs of fuel and other goods - my entire industry has kind of languished lately and my income isn't going up enough to cover the rising costs of fuel, energy, etc, and I've had to take on side jobs to stay where I've been so it's for sure adversely affecting me.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 7:14:07 AM EDT
Doing fine here with 2 adults and a kid living on one income.

Saving.
Investing.
Road trips.
Full frdge.
Stocked bar.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:26:45 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 9:28:17 AM EDT by roboman]

Originally Posted By cammobunker:

Originally Posted By roboman:
Having graduated from college in December of 2007 and entered the workforce full-time in March 2008, I find that I am not really being adversely affected by the poor economy, housing crisis, oil price skyrocketing, etc etc. Sure, I pay a little more for gas than I am used to, but I don't find it crimping my pocketbook. Here's why I feel very economically comfortable at the moment:
Well no shit, junior. You've been in the work force for what, four months? I also notice you don't say what you do.

-I rent instead of own a house, so no worries about property tax and loan issues.
Oh, just wait till your landlord gets a 40% property tax increase like some of the folks around here got. You'll notice when your rent goes up, trust me.

-I am ridiculously frugal with my utilities. I pay $40 a month for power and nothing for heating, because I turn my heat off completely when it's not the winter. My biggest splurge is for cable.
Last I looked, Winter will follow Fall just like it does every year. It'll be along, no doubt, and you'll notice a difference then.

-I live 3 miles from work, so I drive 6 miles a day, 30 miles a week, that's it. If gas became $20/gallon (or some number where I couldn't afford it) I could just walk to work.
OK, good for you. I'm looking forward to your report of walking three miles to work in a snowstorm. You are very fortunate to live so close to work. Those of us who don't live so close to work are somewhat more impacted. Suppose you got transferred to another facility thirty miles away. Would the price of gas affect you then?

-I spend $50/week on groceries, tops. I eat comfortably (albeit basic food, nothing fancy).
A single guy living by himself? I would expect that amount. This is really hitting the families the most.

What about y'all?


So, to sum up: You are a 22-ish y.o. guy, college grad, living alone, own no real property, no kids, no obligations (except, maybe some student loans?). Congratulations. You represent about .001 percent of the US population. The rest of us, those with families, real property, etc see things in a different light.
Do you ever hope to own a home or start a family? Maybe invest for your retirement? Then this stuff does affect you, you just aren't seeing it yet.


I'm merely talking about my current situation. As the point of the post was, I was looking to see who isn't being hurt by the bad economy at the moment. If the point of the thread was to say that no one is being hurt by it, maybe you have a point there.

As for retirement, I have a IRA and 401k already going. I am on pace to retire with a pension when I'm 48 years old.

Thanks for playing though.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:29:28 AM EDT

I am having a very hard time right now.Construction.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:31:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GrIlLa:

I am having a very hard time right now.Construction.


The thread is about people NOT being adversely affected. If you're having a hard time, doesn't that mean you're been affected?
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:35:39 AM EDT
oh well then, so sorry,
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:39:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GrIlLa:
oh well then, so sorry,


It's okay. We still love you
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:45:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By roboman:

Originally Posted By cammobunker:

Originally Posted By roboman:
Having graduated from college in December of 2007 and entered the workforce full-time in March 2008, I find that I am not really being adversely affected by the poor economy, housing crisis, oil price skyrocketing, etc etc. Sure, I pay a little more for gas than I am used to, but I don't find it crimping my pocketbook. Here's why I feel very economically comfortable at the moment:
Well no shit, junior. You've been in the work force for what, four months? I also notice you don't say what you do.

-I rent instead of own a house, so no worries about property tax and loan issues.
Oh, just wait till your landlord gets a 40% property tax increase like some of the folks around here got. You'll notice when your rent goes up, trust me.

-I am ridiculously frugal with my utilities. I pay $40 a month for power and nothing for heating, because I turn my heat off completely when it's not the winter. My biggest splurge is for cable.
Last I looked, Winter will follow Fall just like it does every year. It'll be along, no doubt, and you'll notice a difference then.

-I live 3 miles from work, so I drive 6 miles a day, 30 miles a week, that's it. If gas became $20/gallon (or some number where I couldn't afford it) I could just walk to work.
OK, good for you. I'm looking forward to your report of walking three miles to work in a snowstorm. You are very fortunate to live so close to work. Those of us who don't live so close to work are somewhat more impacted. Suppose you got transferred to another facility thirty miles away. Would the price of gas affect you then?

-I spend $50/week on groceries, tops. I eat comfortably (albeit basic food, nothing fancy).
A single guy living by himself? I would expect that amount. This is really hitting the families the most.

What about y'all?


So, to sum up: You are a 22-ish y.o. guy, college grad, living alone, own no real property, no kids, no obligations (except, maybe some student loans?). Congratulations. You represent about .001 percent of the US population. The rest of us, those with families, real property, etc see things in a different light.
Do you ever hope to own a home or start a family? Maybe invest for your retirement? Then this stuff does affect you, you just aren't seeing it yet.


I'm merely talking about my current situation. As the point of the post was, I was looking to see who isn't being hurt by the bad economy at the moment. If the point of the thread was to say that no one is being hurt by it, maybe you have a point there.

As for retirement, I have a IRA and 401k already going. I am on pace to retire with a pension when I'm 48 years old.

Thanks for playing though.



Holy shit, you're in you early 20's and you think you will retire
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:46:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By patriot73:

Originally Posted By roboman:

Originally Posted By cammobunker:

Originally Posted By roboman:
Having graduated from college in December of 2007 and entered the workforce full-time in March 2008, I find that I am not really being adversely affected by the poor economy, housing crisis, oil price skyrocketing, etc etc. Sure, I pay a little more for gas than I am used to, but I don't find it crimping my pocketbook. Here's why I feel very economically comfortable at the moment:
Well no shit, junior. You've been in the work force for what, four months? I also notice you don't say what you do.

-I rent instead of own a house, so no worries about property tax and loan issues.
Oh, just wait till your landlord gets a 40% property tax increase like some of the folks around here got. You'll notice when your rent goes up, trust me.

-I am ridiculously frugal with my utilities. I pay $40 a month for power and nothing for heating, because I turn my heat off completely when it's not the winter. My biggest splurge is for cable.
Last I looked, Winter will follow Fall just like it does every year. It'll be along, no doubt, and you'll notice a difference then.

-I live 3 miles from work, so I drive 6 miles a day, 30 miles a week, that's it. If gas became $20/gallon (or some number where I couldn't afford it) I could just walk to work.
OK, good for you. I'm looking forward to your report of walking three miles to work in a snowstorm. You are very fortunate to live so close to work. Those of us who don't live so close to work are somewhat more impacted. Suppose you got transferred to another facility thirty miles away. Would the price of gas affect you then?

-I spend $50/week on groceries, tops. I eat comfortably (albeit basic food, nothing fancy).
A single guy living by himself? I would expect that amount. This is really hitting the families the most.

What about y'all?


So, to sum up: You are a 22-ish y.o. guy, college grad, living alone, own no real property, no kids, no obligations (except, maybe some student loans?). Congratulations. You represent about .001 percent of the US population. The rest of us, those with families, real property, etc see things in a different light.
Do you ever hope to own a home or start a family? Maybe invest for your retirement? Then this stuff does affect you, you just aren't seeing it yet.


I'm merely talking about my current situation. As the point of the post was, I was looking to see who isn't being hurt by the bad economy at the moment. If the point of the thread was to say that no one is being hurt by it, maybe you have a point there.

As for retirement, I have a IRA and 401k already going. I am on pace to retire with a pension when I'm 48 years old.

Thanks for playing though.



Holy shit, you're in you early 20's and you think you will retire


A guy can dream, can't he?
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:58:18 AM EDT
Being financially responsible is easy with discipline. Saving for 6 months of emergency expenses is completely unrealistic unless you're blessed with a college education and a cushy job. Having put eight years into the military - and getting screwed out of my GI Bill within the first two - I don't have the leisure of persuing a nice corporate job like some. The income of myself and my wife allows us to get ahead - but not without considerable sacrifice. A lot of people here are spoiled beyond belief - I'm not sure if they'd survive without their creature comforts.

Life is what you make of it. It's not easy for everyone - especially if you've actually had to break your back to get ahead. A lof of "well off" people aren't......I know of a new lawyer who owes over $100,000 in student loans. At least I don't have debt. I miss the military pay and benefits - but the military does not coexist well with a HEALTHY family life.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:07:50 AM EDT
Roboman: Keep your debt low and save. We have returned to the days of it being rough to secure financing for a home. Save your money, keep your debt low. You haven't been out there long enough to get your ass kicked yet, but give it time


Lucky for you, ARFCOM GD has the highest level of financial success stories and economic genius per capita of any other group in America, or American history. Only non ARFCOM GD posters are struggling right now, here, times are good.

Especially those who live in the poorest states in the country, if you follow their lead, you will be buying vacation homes in Bermuda in no time. Listen closely and you too will learn how to be a millionaire as a real estate tycoon in poverty stricken areas, as others who made their living in the housing market in wealthy markets, fall by the way side.

Here, you can ever learn to be a tycoon driving a truck for JB Hunt and retire by the age of 29 with Palyboy bunneys serving you breakfast in bed.

You are in good hands here buddy. Just pay attention and in time, you too will be an ARFCOM Millionaire!
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:09:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 10:11:17 AM EDT by patriot73]

Originally Posted By J_Smith:
Being financially responsible is easy with discipline. Saving for 6 months of emergency expenses is completely unrealistic unless you're blessed with a college education and a cushy job. Having put eight years into the military - and getting screwed out of my GI Bill within the first two - I don't have the leisure of persuing a nice corporate job like some. The income of myself and my wife allows us to get ahead - but not without considerable sacrifice. A lot of people here are spoiled beyond belief - I'm not sure if they'd survive without their creature comforts.

Life is what you make of it. It's not easy for everyone - especially if you've actually had to break your back to get ahead. A lof of "well off" people aren't......I know of a new lawyer who owes over $100,000 in student loans. At least I don't have debt. I miss the military pay and benefits - but the military does not coexist well with a HEALTHY family life.



People living the high life in desks are on very borrowed time. Unemployment is the next piece of the puzzle to fall into place. Keep in mind, many of these people have no wife, no kids and do not own homes. They revel in their glory right now because even in good times, they didn't qualify for loans, it had nothing to do with making smart decisions, but hey, they still have their virginity

And you are right, a lot of people here are spoiled beyond belief and many are simply liars or sheep following the herd.

Thank you for serving the country, I appreciate it. Your strength will prove of great value in days to come.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:09:54 AM EDT
Doing good here. Just landed a $100K plus renovation job.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:12:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By shootemup:
Doing good here. Just landed a $100K plus renovation job.



Man I used to do those all day. I miss those days. Consider yourself lucky.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:13:37 AM EDT
No ARFCOM member is affected.

Not possible.

Since

We all make 100k+/yr
Make 10% on all investments
Have no mortgage payment
Pay cash for everything
Have a 6 month emergency fund
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:15:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By patriot73:

Originally Posted By shootemup:
Doing good here. Just landed a $100K plus renovation job.



Man I used to do those all day. I miss those days. Consider yourself lucky.


For sure. I don't take anything for granted. There have been times where I couldn;t rub two quarters together.

Time are good. The economy here in this part of Colorado is prospering, and my wife brings home the real bacon.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:17:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By XDBACKUPGUN:
No ARFCOM member is affected.

Not possible.

Since

We all make 100k+/yr
Make 10% on all investments
Have no mortgage payment
Pay cash for everything
Have a 6 month emergency fund



Finally, you and I find common ground
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:18:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By shootemup:

Originally Posted By patriot73:

Originally Posted By shootemup:
Doing good here. Just landed a $100K plus renovation job.



Man I used to do those all day. I miss those days. Consider yourself lucky.


For sure. I don't take anything for granted. There have been times where I couldn;t rub two quarters together.

Time are good. The economy here in this part of Colorado is prospering, and my wife brings home the real bacon.


I lost one of my best Carpenters ever a few years back who moved out to Colorado. Good for you man.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:24:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 10:24:37 AM EDT by metalsaber]

Originally Posted By XDBACKUPGUN:
No ARFCOM member is affected.

Not possible.

Since

We all make 100k+/yr
Make 10% on all investments
Have no mortgage payment
Pay cash for everything
Have a 6 month emergency fund


You forgot "Living Within 3 miles of work or less." Cause everyone knows you should.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:24:31 AM EDT
These threads . . .
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:29:08 AM EDT
I'm doing better than I have in a long time.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:33:09 AM EDT
We are doing fine, here. The increase in fuel costs is annoying, since the wife has a pretty good drive to work. Her fuel bill alone is about $400 per month at $4/gallon.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:33:53 AM EDT
We are doing fine. The secret is to live below your means. If you do, then you won't have a problem.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:41:58 AM EDT
We are seeing minimal impact so far. We bought a house we could afford with a low fixed rate. Even now our house is still worth more then what we paid for it.

What the economy did do to us is wake us up about our debt and purchases

1. We have been attacking the credit cards and laying then rest.

2. Because of #1, we are thinking more about what we are buying. We are not longer buying toys and stuff just for the sake of it. Which unfortunately contributes to the slowing economy.

3. We are going back east to visit family in Sept. But that may be the last trip for awhile. We got a good price on tickets this time but not so sure about next time.

So far so good. As long as the jobs hold up we can ride out the storm. My wife is in little danger of losing her job but mine can be subject to downsizing. All I can do is work harder and not give them any excuses.

We don't have kids, which of course makes everything much easier. We do feel for those trying to feed a family. We see how much our food bill jumped, can't image what it costs to feed several kids.


Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:44:45 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 10:51:01 AM EDT by Paul]
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:47:55 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:48:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By roboman:
. I am on pace to retire with a pension when I'm 48 years old.



Good luck with that. I was doing awesome myself till the crash of 2001 ~ 2003. Amazing what difference a few years made. It was like starting all over.
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