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Posted: 10/21/2004 4:01:10 PM EST
Just got back from our local 'everything' beer and wine store's semi-annual beer tasting.

In addition to some really great beers, there was a whiskey barrel aged mead. Out-fucking-standing.

All the taste of whiskey, all the smoothness of mead, and you can drink several without passing out (unlike black bush, which it reminds me of).

Good stuff!
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 4:10:38 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/21/2004 4:21:59 PM EST by Happyshooter]

What do you call a marriage of mead and lambic? B. United International, a specialty importer based in Redding, CT, will for the second year in a row release a very limited amount of Mead the Gueuze, a thirty:seventy blend of English mead from the Lurgashall Winery in Petworth, West Sussex, England and Hanssens Gueuze from Belgium. B. United also imports the English mead separately, along with the sweeter Lurgashall Christmas mead and a special reserve mead aged in wooden whiskey barrels.


Link Posted: 10/21/2004 4:25:35 PM EST


Lurgashall Mead Special Reserve 2000 A.D.
matured in oak barrels which previously aged whisky and rum
Producer: Lurgashall Winery, Petworth, UK



- Core Portfolio
- Keg Collection
- Vintage Portfolio
- Masters' Collection
- British Real Ale & Cider


- Wholesalers
> Order Form
- Retailers / On Premise
> Core Order Form
> Vintage Order Form

Tasting Notes:
Appearance: Light gold, bright, still.
Aroma: Full, soft, slightly more intense than English Mead, smokiness is evident
Taste: Rich honey, apricot, and orange flavors are balanced with woody sharpness from the barrels.
Finish: The whisky flavors become dominant in a long spicy-dry Finish.
Format: 6 * 25.4oz bottles [ Cork Finish ]

The base for our Special Reserve Mead is prepared by fermenting a mixture of honey and water. There are approximately thirty-seven kilograms of honey for every one hundred liters of water.

After the mixture is fermented out to dryness, it is racked and filtered down to a clear state. Now, the liquid is ready to be pumped into oak barrels, which have previously been used for rum and whisky maturation. The mead picks up flavors of the whisky and rum, and finally, after six months, is ready to be filtered and bottled.


The finished product is a completely different type of mead, more complex and drier than traditional versions.



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