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Posted: 9/8/2013 3:47:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/8/2013 3:47:47 PM EST by Powerkicker]
In another thread, the case was made for controlled round feed being superior to push feed for dangerous game. The consensus was that the reliability of crf was superior.

That being said, apart from bolt actions, a case was made for double barreled rifles as well. Even further, many folks also seem to prefer marlin lever guns for dangerous American game.

So, if you were looking to buy just one rifle to actively hunt dangerous game in our own country, what would it be?
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 3:48:55 PM EST
.308 AR. 20 round mags, good soft points, works well for me. YMMV!
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 3:59:17 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/8/2013 4:00:30 PM EST by Grug]
CRF in something as least as powerful as .375H&H, going harder is an option if you can shoot the second shot in a controlled manner. Anything less than this is fool hardy. We are talking stopping a charge, not shooting something with its adrenaline off that is standing a hundred yards away.

I would not use a .308 its to light for this. Dangerous game can involve tracking a wounded animal through thick bush such as coastal rainforests, I dont think even a hard hitting lever gun is up to it compared to a .375, 458 win or similar other big bores. I have a nice 45/70 lever gun and know you can get great 500 grain plus hammerheads, however there is likely more a chance of short stroking the lever while under extreme stress, such as being charged by a Grizzly than say if its a double or a CRF type bolt gun. You want it basic and simple for this sort of thing.

Or you can go party hunting....

For actual gun I would go with a BRNO 550 or a new Win Model 70. Sites would be express only, or at best a 1-2x power optic.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 4:03:58 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 4:12:15 PM EST
barret .50
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 4:14:09 PM EST
Ruger No 1 or pre-64 Winchester in .338 or .375h&h
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 4:25:42 PM EST
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Originally Posted By ActionYobbo:
barret .50
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Just get a technical instead,bro.

Link Posted: 9/8/2013 4:31:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/8/2013 4:36:11 PM EST by ziarifleman]
CRF Winchesters
CZ 550s
P-17 Enfields (lotta work)
Mausers (more work)

I'm sure I'm forgetting some. That's what I'd pick. Particularly the 550, it's well suited to large cartridges.

You really can't have a gun too powerful or too fast if a big brown bear wants to kill you.
In which case I'd favor a massively powerful double rifle.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 4:40:51 PM EST
.458 Lott.

With good shot placement, it's enough to handle any animal walking this earth.


Link Posted: 9/8/2013 4:43:07 PM EST
375 H&H or more in a Mauser action Or a pre 64 Winchester in a heavy caliber. Should do the t

You have spent a lot of money on this trip. Would be a shame to tell the next of kin that. You died proving the push feed was better.

I can see the allure of a lever gun but you should be able to handle it like second nature to make it a viable option. With gloves it should be a big loop lever.

I could probably hunt dangerous game with any caliber if given the time to do it. But with permits travel schedules, my limited time and cost for a outfitter.

You really need to be able to take the worst shot offered....This is where horsepower works...Could you say I passed up a shot because I only had a lever gun.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 4:47:46 PM EST
Marlin in .45-70.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 4:50:13 PM EST
16" AR IN 458 SOCOM.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 4:58:39 PM EST
A lot of heavy artillery being recommended. I guess the proponents aren't counting on harvesting much in the way of meat. Those big bores will certainly do the killing, though.

I use mostly .260 or .30-06, bolt action.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:00:14 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By tcrpe:
A lot of heavy artillery being recommended. I guess the proponents aren't counting on harvesting much in the way of meat. Those big bores will certainly do the killing, though.

I use mostly .260 or .30-06, bolt action.
View Quote

Breaking the shoulder of an advancing bear takes some doing.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:00:20 PM EST
CZ 550 Safari Magnum .375H&H

controlled round feed, check
.375H&H, check
gorgeous rifle with class, check


what's not to like

Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:01:10 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Strykewolf:
Marlin in .45-70.
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This.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:01:14 PM EST
Originally Posted By Powerkicker:
In another thread, the case was made for controlled round feed being superior to push feed for dangerous game. The consensus was that the reliability of crf was superior.

That being said, apart from bolt actions, a case was made for double barreled rifles as well. Even further, many folks also seem to prefer marlin lever guns for dangerous American game.

So, if you were looking to buy just one rifle to actively hunt dangerous game in our own country, what would it be?
View Quote


I would have no problem using the rem 700 action for any game anywhere.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:01:16 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Beamy:
CZ 550 Safari Magnum .375H&H

controlled round feed, check
.375H&H, check
gorgeous rifle with class, check


what's not to like

View Quote

Barrels a touch too long.

Easily fixed, though. Might rather have a .416, though.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:01:45 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Grug:
CRF in something as least as powerful as .375H&H, going harder is an option if you can shoot the second shot in a controlled manner. Anything less than this is fool hardy. We are talking stopping a charge, not shooting something with its adrenaline off that is standing a hundred yards away.

I would not use a .308 its to light for this. Dangerous game can involve tracking a wounded animal through thick bush such as coastal rainforests, I dont think even a hard hitting lever gun is up to it compared to a .375, 458 win or similar other big bores. I have a nice 45/70 lever gun and know you can get great 500 grain plus hammerheads, however there is likely more a chance of short stroking the lever while under extreme stress, such as being charged by a Grizzly than say if its a double or a CRF type bolt gun. You want it basic and simple for this sort of thing.

Or you can go party hunting....

For actual gun I would go with a BRNO 550 or a new Win Model 70. Sites would be express only, or at best a 1-2x power optic.
View Quote


2nd post nails it.

Op said in our country. The USA has only one specie of dangerous game. Brown bears. They 375 h-h is a good round for brown bear. I can say from personal experience that a winchester m70 is A fine a d highly reliable bolt gun and the version currently in production in south Carolina is its best iteration.

Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:10:37 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/8/2013 5:23:17 PM EST by wwace]
Originally Posted By Powerkicker:
In another thread, the case was made for controlled round feed being superior to push feed for dangerous game. The consensus was that the reliability of crf was superior.

That being said, apart from bolt actions, a case was made for double barreled rifles as well. Even further, many folks also seem to prefer marlin lever guns for dangerous American game.

So, if you were looking to buy just one rifle to actively hunt dangerous game in our own country, what would it be?
View Quote
Mauser derived CRF, old Model 70s, Ruger 77MKII, I have a new model 70 in 375 H&H and it is a tack driver, with the best factory trigger I have ever used.

Double rifle is fine but they are not in favor much unless the people you are ask are into African game.

Fuck lever action stupidity, ridiculously complicated.

ETA: Is this for a guided hunt? If you show up with a lever action you will be laughed at. You could discuss bringing an AR platform with your guide beforehand if you wanted to kill something with one. Double rifle-forget it, going to take you too long to learn the manual of arms for it. You should have already bought your rifle and have over 100-200 rounds through it before foing, you should know it like your wife if there is dangerous stuff about. CZ, Ruger, M70 winnies are all good choices and have the same basic manual of arms which every American rifleman should be familiar with. .338 WinMag is the most popular round here, followed by 30-06. Use a good bonded bullet, like the Swift Aframe or Trophy Bonded Bear Claw. Do not use any fucking Barnes x bullet garbage.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:12:09 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By adrock1:


2nd post nails it.

Op said in our country. The USA has only one specie of dangerous game. Brown bears. They 375 h-h is a good round for brown bear. I can say from personal experience that a winchester m70 is A fine a d highly reliable bolt gun and the version currently in production in south Carolina is its best iteration.

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Originally Posted By adrock1:
Originally Posted By Grug:
CRF in something as least as powerful as .375H&H, going harder is an option if you can shoot the second shot in a controlled manner. Anything less than this is fool hardy. We are talking stopping a charge, not shooting something with its adrenaline off that is standing a hundred yards away.

I would not use a .308 its to light for this. Dangerous game can involve tracking a wounded animal through thick bush such as coastal rainforests, I dont think even a hard hitting lever gun is up to it compared to a .375, 458 win or similar other big bores. I have a nice 45/70 lever gun and know you can get great 500 grain plus hammerheads, however there is likely more a chance of short stroking the lever while under extreme stress, such as being charged by a Grizzly than say if its a double or a CRF type bolt gun. You want it basic and simple for this sort of thing.

Or you can go party hunting....

For actual gun I would go with a BRNO 550 or a new Win Model 70. Sites would be express only, or at best a 1-2x power optic.


2nd post nails it.

Op said in our country. The USA has only one specie of dangerous game. Brown bears. They 375 h-h is a good round for brown bear. I can say from personal experience that a winchester m70 is A fine a d highly reliable bolt gun and the version currently in production in south Carolina is its best iteration.



They are not currently chambering 375 H&H in any stainless models. I'd rather have SS for hunting Brown Bears in AK. I have had one for years and it is perfect.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:15:46 PM EST
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Originally Posted By tcrpe:
A lot of heavy artillery being recommended. I guess the proponents aren't counting on harvesting much in the way of meat. Those big bores will certainly do the killing, though.

I use mostly .260 or .30-06, bolt action.
View Quote


If the object is dangerous game, that makes me think brown and polar bear, possibly moose. I've never eaten bear, but I don't see a brown bear that's been dining on putrefying salmon being very tasty. When I hear someone say dangerous game, I'm thinking the object is to have the power to stop a charge instantly, by putting a large, heavy solid bullet through thick bone with authority.

If that was the object in mind, and I had the means, I'd go for a double rifle in .375 H&H or larger.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:17:31 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:21:36 PM EST
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Originally Posted By DaveS:
16" AR IN 458 SOCOM.
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This will work fine, god help you if you miss the brain tho.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:23:37 PM EST
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Originally Posted By troutbum86:


If the object is dangerous game, that makes me think brown and polar bear, possibly moose. I've never eaten bear, but I don't see a brown bear that's been dining on putrefying salmon being very tasty. When I hear someone say dangerous game, I'm thinking the object is to have the power to stop a charge instantly, by putting a large, heavy solid bullet through thick bone with authority.

If that was the object in mind, and I had the means, I'd go for a double rifle in .375 H&H or larger.
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Originally Posted By troutbum86:
Originally Posted By tcrpe:
A lot of heavy artillery being recommended. I guess the proponents aren't counting on harvesting much in the way of meat. Those big bores will certainly do the killing, though.

I use mostly .260 or .30-06, bolt action.


If the object is dangerous game, that makes me think brown and polar bear, possibly moose. I've never eaten bear, but I don't see a brown bear that's been dining on putrefying salmon being very tasty. When I hear someone say dangerous game, I'm thinking the object is to have the power to stop a charge instantly, by putting a large, heavy solid bullet through thick bone with authority.

If that was the object in mind, and I had the means, I'd go for a double rifle in .375 H&H or larger.
Yup but I don't know if I would lump moose into that catergory. I've been told that moose aren't that hard to kill.

I sorta wonder how my .340 Remington Mag would hold up on Brown Bear with a good powder behind a 250 gr partition
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:23:58 PM EST
You guys in the "Whatcha gonna do? Blow the whole thing apart?!" camp outta see what a 270 grain .375 H&H load will do to a deer.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:26:37 PM EST
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Originally Posted By DoubleARon:
You guys in the "Whatcha gonna do? Blow the whole thing apart?!" camp outta see what a 270 grain .375 H&H load will do to a deer.
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Same size in, same size out probably.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:28:00 PM EST
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Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
Same size in, same size out probably.
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Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
Originally Posted By DoubleARon:
You guys in the "Whatcha gonna do? Blow the whole thing apart?!" camp outta see what a 270 grain .375 H&H load will do to a deer.
Same size in, same size out probably.

Bullet doesn't even notice.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:30:27 PM EST
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Originally Posted By DoubleARon:

Bullet doesn't even notice.
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Originally Posted By DoubleARon:
Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
Originally Posted By DoubleARon:
You guys in the "Whatcha gonna do? Blow the whole thing apart?!" camp outta see what a 270 grain .375 H&H load will do to a deer.
Same size in, same size out probably.

Bullet doesn't even notice.
That's what the .350 rem Mag does. The exit would is about the size of my thumb. The .270 with 130gr ballistic tips on the other hand....
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:31:22 PM EST
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Originally Posted By DoubleARon:

Bullet doesn't even notice.
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Originally Posted By DoubleARon:
Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
Originally Posted By DoubleARon:
You guys in the "Whatcha gonna do? Blow the whole thing apart?!" camp outta see what a 270 grain .375 H&H load will do to a deer.
Same size in, same size out probably.

Bullet doesn't even notice.

My boss loves killing things with his .416. It's a great round, flat shooting and extremely powerful.

He's never said anything about it being too powerful.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:32:54 PM EST
I have a H&R 45/70 handi rifle. Single shot, and can handle buffalo bore loads. I wouldn't feel under armed against a moose, or grizzly with that rifle. In a hunting scenario. Plenty of gun for any beast in the USA. For defensive use I'd want a semi, pump, or lever action. You don't get a perfect shot at charging game. 45/70 would still be my choice.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:33:15 PM EST
Bullet construction for the motherfucking win!

John Taylor talked about the 300 grain solids being perfect for the little dik dik antelope in Africa.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:38:07 PM EST
double rifle in .375 flanged
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:39:26 PM EST
The two most common complaints of professional Alaska guides are hunters who are not in good physical condition and hunters who cannot accurately shoot their rifles. Because these hunters do not practice enough they cannot shoot accurately enough. They miss their best chance at taking their dream animal or worse yet, they wound and lose an animal. Most experienced guides prefer that a hunter come to camp with a .270 or .30-06 rifle they can shoot well rather than a shiny new magnum that has been fired just enough to get sighted-in. If you are going to hunt brown bear on the Alaska Peninsula or Kodiak Island, a .30-06 loaded with 200- or 220-grain Nosler® or similar premium bullet will do the job with good shot placement. Only consider using a .300, .338 or larger magnum if you can shoot it as well as you can the .30-06.
View Quote


http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=hunting.firearms
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:39:58 PM EST
I have -0- desire to kill a bear; it's just never crossed my mind to take an interest in them. YMMV.

When we went elk hunting in 2010 in bear country, I carried a 30-06. YMMV.

Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:40:55 PM EST
I would go for a fine double if I could afford it. You essentially have a back up rifle and one with a quick follow up shot. They are made in some of the most impressive calibers. The marlin lever isn't a bad choice either.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:40:56 PM EST
Remington 700 C/BDL 30-06 with a Leupold VX-III 3.5-10x40mm


Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:42:34 PM EST
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Originally Posted By MotorMouth:
The two most common complaints of professional Alaska guides are hunters who are not in good physical condition and hunters who cannot accurately shoot their rifles. Because these hunters do not practice enough they cannot shoot accurately enough. They miss their best chance at taking their dream animal or worse yet, they wound and lose an animal. Most experienced guides prefer that a hunter come to camp with a .270 or .30-06 rifle they can shoot well rather than a shiny new magnum that has been fired just enough to get sighted-in. If you are going to hunt brown bear on the Alaska Peninsula or Kodiak Island, a .30-06 loaded with 200- or 220-grain Nosler® or similar premium bullet will do the job with good shot placement. Only consider using a .300, .338 or larger magnum if you can shoot it as well as you can the .30-06.


http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=hunting.firearms



I've seen a lot of meat wasted by huge guns. Makes field dressing a really gross proposition.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:47:23 PM EST
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Originally Posted By MotorMouth:
The two most common complaints of professional Alaska guides are hunters who are not in good physical condition and hunters who cannot accurately shoot their rifles. Because these hunters do not practice enough they cannot shoot accurately enough. They miss their best chance at taking their dream animal or worse yet, they wound and lose an animal. Most experienced guides prefer that a hunter come to camp with a .270 or .30-06 rifle they can shoot well rather than a shiny new magnum that has been fired just enough to get sighted-in. If you are going to hunt brown bear on the Alaska Peninsula or Kodiak Island, a .30-06 loaded with 200- or 220-grain Nosler® or similar premium bullet will do the job with good shot placement. Only consider using a .300, .338 or larger magnum if you can shoot it as well as you can the .30-06.


http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=hunting.firearms

Agreed shot placement is key. I never felt that recoil from a .338 was much worse than the 30-06 in a well fitting rifle. Premium bullets are well worth the price, they will be the least expensive item in your outfit.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:50:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/8/2013 6:04:17 PM EST by armaborealis]
The 338 win mag is a favorite among AK brown bear guides.

ETA I personally used an 1895 on my Kodiak hunt and the missus brought a 30-06. I love lever guns and she shhots the 06 well. Shot placement FTW.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:50:57 PM EST
I would not be afraid using a 30-06 bolt action on any animal on the North American continent.

But I would feel more comfortable with at least a .375 H&H Magnum on brown or polar bear.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:50:57 PM EST
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Originally Posted By tcrpe:



I've seen a lot of meat wasted by huge guns. Makes field dressing a really gross proposition.
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Originally Posted By tcrpe:
Originally Posted By MotorMouth:
The two most common complaints of professional Alaska guides are hunters who are not in good physical condition and hunters who cannot accurately shoot their rifles. Because these hunters do not practice enough they cannot shoot accurately enough. They miss their best chance at taking their dream animal or worse yet, they wound and lose an animal. Most experienced guides prefer that a hunter come to camp with a .270 or .30-06 rifle they can shoot well rather than a shiny new magnum that has been fired just enough to get sighted-in. If you are going to hunt brown bear on the Alaska Peninsula or Kodiak Island, a .30-06 loaded with 200- or 220-grain Nosler® or similar premium bullet will do the job with good shot placement. Only consider using a .300, .338 or larger magnum if you can shoot it as well as you can the .30-06.


http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=hunting.firearms



I've seen a lot of meat wasted by huge guns. Makes field dressing a really gross proposition.

I never try to shoot game any place except the vitals. I don't like to eat the lungs.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:51:39 PM EST
I am a big fan, and user of the Double Rifle. I have used them in Africa, Canada, Texas, Montana, and Idaho.

For a bolt rifle I prefer a Heym Express rifle or Blaser R 93.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:53:02 PM EST
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Originally Posted By xtrastout:

Agreed shot placement is key. I never felt that recoil from a .338 was much worse than the 30-06 in a well fitting rifle. Premium bullets are well worth the price, they will be the least expensive item in your outfit.
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Originally Posted By xtrastout:
Originally Posted By MotorMouth:
The two most common complaints of professional Alaska guides are hunters who are not in good physical condition and hunters who cannot accurately shoot their rifles. Because these hunters do not practice enough they cannot shoot accurately enough. They miss their best chance at taking their dream animal or worse yet, they wound and lose an animal. Most experienced guides prefer that a hunter come to camp with a .270 or .30-06 rifle they can shoot well rather than a shiny new magnum that has been fired just enough to get sighted-in. If you are going to hunt brown bear on the Alaska Peninsula or Kodiak Island, a .30-06 loaded with 200- or 220-grain Nosler® or similar premium bullet will do the job with good shot placement. Only consider using a .300, .338 or larger magnum if you can shoot it as well as you can the .30-06.


http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=hunting.firearms

Agreed shot placement is key. I never felt that recoil from a .338 was much worse than the 30-06 in a well fitting rifle. Premium bullets are well worth the price, they will be the least expensive item in your outfit.



I don't enjoy shooting a .30-06 off the bench. The older I get the more I like my 6.8 SPC's recoil level. But in the field, recoil isn't an issue. I bought my dad a .300 weatherby a few years back, and one afternoon I wanted to take a shot at a doe where the range wasn't known (turns out she was only about 280) and I grabbed his .300 and took the shot. Never felt a thing. Deer just flopped right over - bonded bullet through the lungs, no lost meat.

Link Posted: 9/8/2013 5:53:14 PM EST
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Originally Posted By xtrastout:

I never try to shoot game any place except the vitals. I don't like to eat the lungs.
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Originally Posted By xtrastout:
Originally Posted By tcrpe:
Originally Posted By MotorMouth:
The two most common complaints of professional Alaska guides are hunters who are not in good physical condition and hunters who cannot accurately shoot their rifles. Because these hunters do not practice enough they cannot shoot accurately enough. They miss their best chance at taking their dream animal or worse yet, they wound and lose an animal. Most experienced guides prefer that a hunter come to camp with a .270 or .30-06 rifle they can shoot well rather than a shiny new magnum that has been fired just enough to get sighted-in. If you are going to hunt brown bear on the Alaska Peninsula or Kodiak Island, a .30-06 loaded with 200- or 220-grain Nosler® or similar premium bullet will do the job with good shot placement. Only consider using a .300, .338 or larger magnum if you can shoot it as well as you can the .30-06.


http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=hunting.firearms



I've seen a lot of meat wasted by huge guns. Makes field dressing a really gross proposition.

I never try to shoot game any place except the vitals. I don't like to eat the lungs.

That's where I'm at. Good double lung that transects the heart just doesn't destroy any meat, really.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 6:06:16 PM EST
Well this thread was about other than bolt actions but my first choice is my pre 64 model 70 .338-06 and 250 grain Noslers. As for moose not being hard to kill, I have seen one take a hell of a lot of hits from a 30-06 with 165 grainers before it expired. When you hunt big game it is my opinion you should use heavy enough bullets for the size game you are hunting.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 6:09:05 PM EST
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Originally Posted By NE450No2:
I am a big fan, and user of the Double Rifle. I have used them in Africa, Canada, Texas, Montana, and Idaho.

For a bolt rifle I prefer a Heym Express rifle or Blaser R 93.
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I envy you the double. What make and caliber is it?
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 6:10:19 PM EST
Marlin Lever Action in 45-70 pre Remington ownership. So pre 2007.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 6:19:12 PM EST
i like my FAL in .358 win
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 6:45:02 PM EST
I'd consider a GOOD push feed rifle for dangerous game. I'm thinking specifically of the Sako. Also the M70, Mauser, Dakota and similar are good to go with minimal attention. I'd want a 9.3x62 (250TTSX@2650) or .375 (250@2800), unless particularly numb to recoil in which case a 416 is appropriate.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 6:45:55 PM EST
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Originally Posted By xtrastout:

I envy you the double. What make and caliber is it?
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Originally Posted By xtrastout:
Originally Posted By NE450No2:
I am a big fan, and user of the Double Rifle. I have used them in Africa, Canada, Texas, Montana, and Idaho.

For a bolt rifle I prefer a Heym Express rifle or Blaser R 93.

I envy you the double. What make and caliber is it?

Ill give you two guesses on the caliber.
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