Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 3/20/2006 5:03:35 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/20/2006 4:37:47 PM EST by USMC88-93]
My average cost is $14.97 and the current cost (as I wrote this) is $27.98
I know how the stock prices fluctuate every day, but I am un familiar with how to properly set a stop on a stock.
If I set it too high the stock may hit the stop mark in its daily fluctuations and sell before it goes back up and If I set it too low I loose extra money.
How do I determine the middle ground.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 5:03:17 PM EST

Originally Posted By USMC88-93:
My average cost is $14.97 and the current cost (as I wrote this) is $27.98
I know how the stock prices fluctuate every day, but I am un familiar with how to properly set a stop on a stock.
If I set it too high the stock may hit the stop mark in its daily fluctuations and sell before it goes back up and If I set it too low I loose extra money.
How do I determine the middle ground.


I haven't done this in quite a few years, have zero familiarity with Corning, and have never traded it for a customer's or my own account. That legalese mumbo jumbo aside, my guidelines would probably still be the same.

-Get familiar with the price swings of the stock,so you can determine how often it trades at or near your stop level. Just how wide are those swings, and would it be fairly common for the stock to move down to your level, then back up to the day's highs?

-Take a look at some technical charts so you can see the trading ranges of Corning, and try to determine where the price "support level" is in relation to your stop price. If you're at or near the support level and it breaks through, does it historically bounce back with strong support (from heavy volume trading) and continue on to previous higher levels, or will it generally at that price get weak support and continue to fall to a new low? It would be a shame to see your stop get triggered, only to watch the stock regain what you gave up, and then some.

-Get familiar with the daily trading volume. Without knowing the size of your position, you sure as heck don't want to be one of the big trades for a trader on a particularly slow trading day. If that happens, you can count on getting stopped out.

-If you think the prospects for the stock are pretty good, consider placing a stop on maybe half of your position. You can take some dough off the table, but continue to stay in the game.

Those are some random thoughts just popping into my head, but don't despair. I'm sure someone with a little more trading savvy will be along shortly.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 5:25:49 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/20/2006 5:31:42 PM EST by raven]
Draw a trend line based on the stock's lows, like this.

www.stockcharts.com/education/ChartAnalysis/trendlines.html

When the price touches it make a decision to either buy more if you think the stock's in good shape, or start thinking about selling to take your profits. I usually sell a stock when I'm down about 10%. But that's just what I do. It's so much easier on your mind to take the hit than watch your account erode and you just sit their hoping it'll come back and you'll get even. And you protect yourself.

Kudos for considering an exit strategy and looking for a plan. The 50 day moving average looks like a peachy support for GLW, too. Nice looking price action, I think you should definitely stay in. Looks like a winner.
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 10:26:03 PM EST
easiest way is to see the "future demand" in fiber optics sector and its equipment makers like JDS Uniphase, Ciena, Finisinar, Lucent and others. Also where the demands are at like Level3, AT&T, Verizon and more. That is ONE way to see it.

Other way is to see the Technical analysis of the GLW. BTW i love Corning.

Just that I am long on Level(3), JDS Uniphase right now.
Top Top