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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 6/17/2003 8:30:18 AM EDT
I don't know what they're made of (assuming aluminum), that small holster manufacturers use to wet detail-mold the leather around a specific gun for a perfect fit. Just wondering.
Link Posted: 6/17/2003 8:54:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/17/2003 8:55:53 AM EDT by CR_OPSO]
I have no idea - but I've wet molded one around a real gun several times. If you haven't done it before, here's what I do: I don't usually dunk the whole holster in the water, but wet the outside pretty good. Spray the gun down with oil REALLY good. Put the gun in the holster and mold it - in some spots you made need to wet it a little more to get it to stretch (wet rag or paper towel). Once it's molded, I remove the gun (with a fake gun, I'd leave it in) and put the holster in a fairly air tight container (small ice chest) - so it takes a LONG time to dry out. Sometimes I check it after a few hours to make sure the fit is still good - but usually that's it. It may take a couple days to dry - but when it's done, it'll be really hard and hold it's shape. It won't look as detailed as the Galcos, Bianchis, etc - but will fit perfectly. I forgot to add: Dry the gun thoroughly - and re-oil it - not a bit of rust on any of my guns (mostly done on revolvers). CR
Link Posted: 6/17/2003 9:03:49 AM EDT
Alot of holster mfrs are using vacuum forming to get a good tight fit between the holster and pistol.
Link Posted: 6/17/2003 9:13:30 AM EDT
Originally Posted By CR_OPSO: I have no idea - but I've wet molded one around a real gun several times. If you haven't done it before, here's what I do: I don't usually dunk the whole holster in the water, but wet the outside pretty good. Spray the gun down with oil REALLY good. Put the gun in the holster and mold it - in some spots you made need to wet it a little more to get it to stretch (wet rag or paper towel). Once it's molded, I remove the gun (with a fake gun, I'd leave it in) and put the holster in a fairly air tight container (small ice chest) - so it takes a LONG time to dry out. Sometimes I check it after a few hours to make sure the fit is still good - but usually that's it. It may take a couple days to dry - but when it's done, it'll be really hard and hold it's shape. It won't look as detailed as the Galcos, Bianchis, etc - but will fit perfectly. I forgot to add: Dry the gun thoroughly - and re-oil it - not a bit of rust on any of my guns (mostly done on revolvers). CR
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I've thought that that's what most people do when making their own. I guess I was curious how much these dummy guns cost. If they're cheap enough it would be worth it to get one for the model you need. Somehow I'm guessing your way, (with the actual handgun) is the best way for the guy just wanting to make a simple belt holster.
Link Posted: 6/17/2003 9:16:59 AM EDT
ASP makes "[b][red]red-guns[/red][/b]" for training and disarmament practice, should work for holster molding, here: [url]http://www.safetyleague.com/slstore/access/redguns.htm[/url] Mike
Link Posted: 6/17/2003 10:44:52 AM EDT
Don't use water when wet molding a holster! Get some rubbing alcohol and wet the leather down with that. Works as well as water and dries LOTS faster. Put the holster in a large zip lock baggie and pour in enough alky to saturate the leather. Lots easier that trying to pour on enough from the bottle. As far as where to get the aluminum guns to form holsters with, I ain't got a clue! Don in Ohio
Link Posted: 6/17/2003 3:42:15 PM EDT
You MAKE them. How? Using a real one, of course! You make the mold out of plaster, using wax to keep it out of the real one and making sure a thin coat of oil is everywhere. If you get plaster in the real one, just carefully pick it out. It will not scratch the finish. You make a 1/2 mold at a time. When the plaster hardens (30 minutes), you paint the mold with release agent and fill it up to the top. Once that hardens, you can seperate the mold halves and remove the real one. Now you have a cavity that is an exact replicla of the real one. You make a sprue hole in a logical area (barrel), put the mold together and bake at 250 F for a few hours. Casting is best done with a low-melting point alloy like tin/lead. Eutectic solder (63-37 Sn-Pb)works well as its incredibly fluid and quite hard. Other low-temp alloys like Linotype are also good. Don't try aluminum as its far too high temperature and will explode a plaster mold. You can use this technique to cast an investment for higher temp casting (like aluminum). The investment is a hard wax (almost a plastic)replica of the part to be produced that is assembled onto a sprue riser, coated with a refractory material, dried and then fired to remove the investment via melting. This is then placed in a flask and sand is poured around the mold. The molten metal is then poured into the mold, allowed to harden and the mold is then broken off the finished part. I am a home foundry kind of guy. I cast my own cuff weights for my AR, making an 8 pound rifle into a 13 pounder with only a 1/2 cuff weight. Talk about a LOW center of gravity.
Link Posted: 6/17/2003 3:53:23 PM EDT
Buddy of mine would use air-soft guns to make holsters. Never heard of nor experienced any problems with the fit.
Link Posted: 6/17/2003 4:09:54 PM EDT
someone told me never to mold leather with water, as it could cause mildew. they suggested "saddle soap" instead?
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