Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 9/14/2004 3:12:22 AM EST
Does anyone know? Thanks!
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 3:14:06 AM EST
George Bush Sr. was in combat in the Pacific.
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 3:14:52 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/14/2004 3:15:10 AM EST by chapperjoe]
As president: George Washington?
As soldier: Bush 41 (d'oh!),JFK (), IKE, TR
As enemy combatant: Waffle-boy
(Note: If smoking weed at Oxford during 'nam counts, then..........)
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 3:14:54 AM EST
George W Bush visited Baghdad during christmas, or was it thanksgiving?
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 3:14:58 AM EST
If you mean one that fought in a war, it would be G. Bush I, he was a pilot in WWII.
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 3:18:38 AM EST

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:
As president: George Washington?
As soldier: Bush 41 (d'oh!),JFK (), IKE, TR
As enemy combatant: Waffle-boy
(Note: If smoking weed at Oxford during 'nam counts, then..........)

Washington wasn't President during any battles. Abraham Lincoln was.
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 3:23:37 AM EST
Sorry. I ment that was President while he was on the battlefield.
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 3:28:05 AM EST
If you mean a president that actually took part in a battle while in office, I can't think of any.
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 3:29:10 AM EST

Originally Posted By M38:
If you mean a president that actually took part in a battle while in office, I can't think of any.



I mean was commanding the army, on the battlefield, during the battle.
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 4:07:59 AM EST
Madison "helped" command the Army at the Battle of Bladensburg in 1814 and they lost.

Pres. Bush and VP Cheney were both on a battlefield of sorts on Sept. 11. A somewhat better terrorist plan would have resulted in both of them dead.

GunLvr
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 4:13:33 AM EST
No sitting US President has ever commanded troops in battle during their time in office. Some were present at Battles, (Madison during War of 1812, Lincoln during Civil War), but were not in direct command.

George Washington did directly command US troops used to put down the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794, but they fought no battles.
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 4:17:18 AM EST

Originally Posted By PAEBR332:
No sitting US President has ever commanded troops in battle during their time in office. Some were present at Battles, (Madison during War of 1812, Lincoln during Civil War), but were not in direct command.

George Washington did directly command US troops used to put down the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794, but they fought no battles.



Whiskey Rebellion?

You have Tea Parties and Rebellions over Whiskey??
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 4:20:20 AM EST

Originally Posted By FiftyCalibre:

Originally Posted By PAEBR332:
No sitting US President has ever commanded troops in battle during their time in office. Some were present at Battles, (Madison during War of 1812, Lincoln during Civil War), but were not in direct command.

George Washington did directly command US troops used to put down the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794, but they fought no battles.



Whiskey Rebellion?

You have Tea Parties and Rebellions over Whiskey??



Yup.

The new Federal Government placed an excise tax on whiskey, and the poor farmers of western Pennsylvania refused to pay it. They raised a small militia to defend themselves. President Washington rode at the head of a 12,000 man army into western PA, and the rebels quickly disbanded. Not much of a rebellion.
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 4:31:19 AM EST

Originally Posted By Penguin_101:
When was the last time there was a President on the battle field?



Fidel Castro....President for life.

(You did not mention U.S only)

Link Posted: 9/14/2004 4:39:10 AM EST
The first fuckshtick who says John F'ng Kerry is gonna get an alley apple
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 4:45:04 AM EST
The only President to don a uniform in combat was George Washington:

In reference to the whiskey rebellion:

Their rebellion spread swiftly but they were no match for the power of George Washington. He may have been president at the time, but was not averse to donning his old military uniform and getting back into the fray (imagine today's presidents pulling the ol' uniform out of mothballs and deciding to lead the invasion of Panama, Iraq or Somalia). Washington, with Hamilton by his side, led an army of some 12,000 men into western Pennsylvania and easily put down the revolt. That was the end of the Whiskey Rebellion although, if memory serves, the excise tax was either repealed or (unlike the whiskey) diluted.

http://earlyamerica.com/review/fall96/whiskey.html

Shooter
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 4:45:42 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/14/2004 4:46:18 AM EST by shooter220]
Hate the double tap
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 6:14:03 AM EST
Unfortunately, Gen. Jubal A. Early, C.S.A. missed Lincoln at Ft. Stevens near Washintong in July, 1864.
Top Top