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Posted: 10/28/2004 2:02:40 PM EST
These are probably some dumb questions but I see lots of them on high end red dot sights and wanted to know what makes them better than a standard mount? I know I have seen some that have a throw lever which would allow quick removal and that I can understand might come in handy. Also on most red dot sights can you still use iron sights or flip up sights as a back up and if so why would the throw level mount be needed?
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 2:06:38 PM EST
One word.

BLING




Yes, I'm a smart ass.
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 2:08:18 PM EST
A cantilever mount allows you to mount the aimpoint further forward, over the delta ring.
This is where many people (myself included) prefer to mount their Aimpoints.
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 2:08:32 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/28/2004 2:08:44 PM EST by TheRicker]
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 2:16:36 PM EST
The nice thing about a cantilever mount (one that puts the red-dot sight out over the delta ring) is that is allows you to:

1. keep the profile lower
2. keep the red dot aligned with the iron sights

Quick-remove throw levers are a convenience if you take the mount on and off frequently.
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 2:23:40 PM EST
Cantilever mounts are designed to work with night vision optics, the mount pushes the sight forward to allow cowitnessed mounting of optics and eye relief for goggles (NVGs).
Throw lever mounts were made to work with the night vision optics so they could be removed for daylight ops, and people took to using them on all optics.

Plus they look KEWL!
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 2:26:26 PM EST
NODs
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 2:35:00 PM EST
I do understand that cantilever mounts do not always have throw levers but I see that the throw lever design seems to be popular if money isnt a problem. I guess that would make since that the cantilever mounts would improve night vision goggle along with iron sight alignment. I have always thought they looked cool just wanted a reason to justify getting one in the distant future.
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 2:38:24 PM EST
Also whats the difference between the night vision compatable aimpoint sights and the non night vision ones? Are the NV ones infra red illuminated as well as the standard red dot?
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 2:41:00 PM EST
They're Dead Sexy!!!!!
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 2:42:07 PM EST

Originally Posted By thedukeryan:
Also whats the difference between the night vision compatable aimpoint sights and the non night vision ones? Are the NV ones infra red illuminated as well as the standard red dot?



The red dot has a low enough setting that it does not "bloom" the NOD. It is not visible to the naked eye but it is still visible through the NOD.

Bob
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 2:46:02 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 2:46:04 PM EST

Originally Posted By FatMan:
The nice thing about a cantilever mount (one that puts the red-dot sight out over the delta ring) is that is allows you to:

1. keep the profile lower
2. keep the red dot aligned with the iron sights



I'm a little confused about this. Most mounts are the same height, regardless of being cantilever or not. Also, the cantilever mounts are overall larger than a standard straight-up mount.
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 4:40:41 PM EST
I've seen some mounts that drop down in front of the sight rail, allowing the user to still keep a good cheek/stock position without a raised cheek piece.

The reason I'd use a QD mount is if believed I could be in a situation where the optics could be scratched, cracked or otherwise broken to the point I couldn't see through them, I wouldn't want to be messing at that time with an allen wrench.
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 6:16:48 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/28/2004 6:18:06 PM EST by fizassist]

Originally Posted By Moondog:
I've seen some mounts that drop down in front of the sight rail, allowing the user to still keep a good cheek/stock position without a raised cheek piece.



I think those are usually called "dog-leg", "bi-level", "z" or (something else I'm forgetting) mounts. The cantilevers are for flattops.


The reason I'd use a QD mount is if believed I could be in a situation where the optics could be scratched, cracked or otherwise broken to the point I couldn't see through them, I wouldn't want to be messing at that time with an allen wrench.


+1. They are useful for removing a busted optic fast or for mounting/removing a magnified optic when said optic interferes with the iron sights.
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 6:37:28 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 6:47:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/28/2004 6:51:05 PM EST by M4]
My favorite set up is the ARMS TTA22M86 mount....

With a good flip-up front sight...currently using a GG&G...


No need for a cantilever since I'm not using night vision, or a front sight while my Aimpoint is mounted. Aimpoint fails? Throw the lever, pop it off, and flip up the front sight in about 5 seconds. Low profile, and dead-on accurate.
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 6:51:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/28/2004 6:58:13 PM EST by Boom_Stick]
For me I've found there's no difference between the cantilever position or the Aimpoints QRP position.

The ARMS mount shifted windage when stress was applied....the quick release system isn't all it's cracked up to be.
I replced my QRP's knob with a knob from a sawed off carry handle and it tightens down better. It doesn't shift when I push the mount left or right.
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 6:55:22 PM EST
The Aimpoint housing takes up less of your field of view the further forward it's mounted.
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 7:05:13 PM EST
People who don't hve a KAC RAS II need one to put the Aimpoint right at the sweet spot.
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 7:10:25 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/28/2004 7:11:03 PM EST by Paul]
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 7:19:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By Paul:

Originally Posted By Zak-Smith:
The Aimpoint housing takes up less of your field of view the further forward it's mounted.


Right until the point where you remember you're shooting a red dot and you're suppose to open both eyes! And then nothing blocks anything, anywhere, with any type of mounting!
A very very common mistake.


A mistake I do not make. I shoot both eyes open with everything except sometimes long-range percision rifles.

Put your thumb in front of your face and look into the distance. Then put it an arm's length away. It's more distracting when it's close because it obscures more of each eye's vision.

-z

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