Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 9/10/2004 3:23:28 PM EST
?
I have never understood how a flash suppr3essor could launch a grenade?
Link Posted: 9/10/2004 3:24:43 PM EST
A flash supressor doesn't fire the grenade. The round does...
Link Posted: 9/10/2004 3:26:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/10/2004 3:26:24 PM EST by rifleman2000]
A grenade that attaches to the flash suppressor and is launched by either a powerful blank, or the grenade has a bullet trap, OR it has a hole to let the bullet pass through the grenade. Bottom line, the muzzle blast propels the grenade. Exactly how depends on the weapon.
Link Posted: 9/10/2004 3:35:06 PM EST
I think rifle grenades are neat, I don't think they should have phased them out.
Link Posted: 9/10/2004 3:37:28 PM EST
Anyone know of an incident of one going off while on the end of a weapon?

MT
Link Posted: 9/10/2004 3:39:13 PM EST
Were rifle grenades ever developed for the M-16 platform?
Link Posted: 9/10/2004 3:40:52 PM EST
It's called the Speshul WePunz SW-5.
Link Posted: 9/10/2004 3:40:58 PM EST
www.e-gunparts.com/DisplayAd.asp?chrProductSKU=&chrSuperSKU=881770&MC=

This is a current, military issue grenade set used by the IDF for training purposes on .223 caliber M16 and Galil rifles. These fully-inert, 14" grenades are patterned after the IMI BT/AT-44 dual-purpose rifle grenade. The brand new set is packaged in the original wooden crate, dated 1-98, includes 6 grenade assemblies and the following repair parts: 40 plastic fins, 32 body tubes, 12 outer sleeves, 30 spacer rings, 24 locking nuts, 2 nut wrenches, 1 key wrench, 20 M16 ladder sights and 30 Galil ladder sights in 35/60/85 meter graduations (197 pieces total). Weight, 27 lbs.




Link Posted: 9/10/2004 3:47:02 PM EST
www.inert-ord.net/yugos/yughr/m60/




M60P1 HE Rifle Grenade
This is a 30mm spigot launched rifle grenade designed to produce large penetrating fragments.
The main body is made of steel, with an aluminum tail boom and plastic fins.
Modern spigot launched grenades typically are designed to fit a 22mm diameter launcher. This was first standardized for NATO forces, and apparently has become an international (?) standard.







The base plug holds a special grenade launching cartridge (7.62x39)


This grenade is listed as having a 410 meter range, with 50 meter fragmentation radius.
The fuze is a UTM-70-P1 SuperQuick impact type.
The safety cap is removed and the pin unscrewed to ready for use. The safety mechanism arms when fired.







The photo below, (20 Feb, 1999), is of Serbian Police on patrol in Studenčane, Kosovo.
These appear to be similar grenades, of a slightly different body profile. I don't know their designation.

Link Posted: 9/10/2004 3:56:57 PM EST
I never knew they had a rifle grenade for the M-16, when we trained for viet nam with M-14's they told us that the M-79 , 40mm grenade launcher (blooper) replaced the rifle grenade. cool pics.
Link Posted: 9/10/2004 4:02:05 PM EST
www.inert-ord.net/yugos/yughr/m93/index.html

Yugoslavian M93 HEAT Rifle Grenade



This is a 40mm hollow charge device, made of aluminum and plastic, with steel balls molded into the warhead body for additional local fragmentation effect.

Although the acronym HEAT (High Explosive Anti Tank) is still used, this would be more appropriately called an “anti-armor” grenade, as it would not have much effect on modern tanks.

Likely intended for armored troop carriers and similar targets





Marked: "KRTM 40mm M 93"
As with all "hollow charge" munitions, most of the space inside the warhead is empty. The explosive filling the bottom third under a cone shaped metal liner (not shown).




As with the M60 Rifle Grenade, the safety pin is unscrewed, rather than pulled. It prevents movement of the internal parts.

The base detonating fuze consists of a striker, in a central tube, which slides forward on impact hitting the detonator.

This striker is restrained by three small locking balls, set in holes in the wall of the central tube. Those balls are held in place by a moveable outer sleeve. A spring pushes the sleeve up. A large single ball prevents the sleeve from moving completely forward, this keeps the holes for the locking balls covered and the balls in place.

At the moment of firing, inertia causes the sleeve to move back, compressing the spring. This frees the large ball which falls aside. As the grenade departs, the spring pushes the sleeve back up. Without the big ball blocking the way, the holes are uncovered. The three locking balls are no longer held in place. The striker is free, which moves forward upon impact detonating the grenade.
Link Posted: 9/11/2004 4:28:17 AM EST
Well,......pistol grenades are better know as glocks....
S.O.
Link Posted: 9/11/2004 8:13:47 AM EST

Originally Posted By 1776:
www.e-gunparts.com/DisplayAd.asp?chrProductSKU=&chrSuperSKU=881770&MC=

This is a current, military issue grenade set used by the IDF for training purposes on .223 caliber M16 and Galil rifles. These fully-inert, 14" grenades are patterned after the IMI BT/AT-44 dual-purpose rifle grenade. The brand new set is packaged in the original wooden crate, dated 1-98, includes 6 grenade assemblies and the following repair parts: 40 plastic fins, 32 body tubes, 12 outer sleeves, 30 spacer rings, 24 locking nuts, 2 nut wrenches, 1 key wrench, 20 M16 ladder sights and 30 Galil ladder sights in 35/60/85 meter graduations (197 pieces total). Weight, 27 lbs.



www.e-gunparts.com/images/adz/881770.jpg



That isnt current. The IDF got rid of the rifle grenade, they use M203's now.

Rifle grenades were henously innaccurate and very short ranged. The 40mm rifled grenade launcher is much superior.
Top Top