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Posted: 10/5/2004 5:36:20 AM EST
What would you do?

>
> My question to all of you is: Would you have made the same choice?
>
> At a fund-raising dinner for a school that serves learning disabled
> children, the father of one of the students delivered a speech that
> would never be forgotten by all who attended.
>
> After extolling the school and its dedicated staff, he offered a
> question.
>
> "When not interfered with by outside influences, everything nature does
> is done with perfection. Yet my son, Shay, cannot learn things as other
> children do. He cannot understand things as other children do. Where
> is the natural order of things in my son?" The audience was stilled by
> the query.
>
> The father continued. "I believe, that when a child like Shay comes
> into the world, an opportunity to realize true human nature presents
> itself, and it comes, in the way other people treat the child." Then he
> told the following story:
>
> Shay and his father had walked past a park where some boys Shay knew
> were playing baseball asked, "Do you think they'll let me play?" Shay's
> father knew that most of the boys would not want someone like Shay on
> their team, but the father also understood that if his son were allowed
> to play, it would give him a much-needed sense of belonging. Shay's
> father approached one of the boys on the field and asked if Shay could
> play.
>
> The boy looked around for guidance and, getting none, he took matters
> into his own hands and said, "We're losing by six runs and the game is
> in the eighth inning. I guess he can be on our team and we'll try to
> put him in to bat in the ninth inning." In the bottom of the eighth
> inning, Shay's team scored a few runs but was still behind by three. In
> the top of the ninth inning, Shay put on a glove and played in the
> outfield.
>
> Even though no hits came his way, he was obviously ecstatic just to be
> in the game and on the field, grinning from ear to ear as his father
> waved to him from the stands. In the bottom of the ninth inning, Shay's
> team scored again. Now, with two outs and the bases loaded, the
> potential winning run was on base and Shay was scheduled to be next at
> bat. At this juncture, let Shay bat and give away their chance to win
> the game?
>
> Surprisingly, Shay was given the bat. Everyone knew that a hit was all
> but impossible "cause Shay didn't even know how to hold the bat
> properly, much less connect with the ball.
>
> However, as Shay stepped up to the plate, the pitcher moved in a few
> steps to lob the ball in softly so Shay could at least be able to make
> contact. The first pitch came and Shay swung clumsily and missed. The
> pitcher again took a few steps forward to toss the ball softly towards
> Shay.
>
> As the pitch came in, Shay swung at the ball and hit a slow ground ball
> right back at the pitcher. The pitcher picked up the soft grounder and
> could have easily thrown the ball to the first baseman. Shay would have
> been out and that would have been the end of the game.
>
> Instead, the pitcher took the ball and turned and threw the ball on a
> high arc to right field, far beyond the reach of the first baseman.
> Everyone started yelling, "Shay, run to first! Run to First!" Never in
> his life had Shay ever made it to first base. He scampered down the
> baseline, wide-eyed and startled. Everyone yelled, "Run to second, Run
> to second!" By the time Shay rounded first base, the right fielder had
> the ball. He could have thrown the ball to the second-baseman for the
> tag, but he understood the pitcher's intentions and intentionally threw
> the ball high and far over the third-baseman's head. Shay ran toward
> second base as the runners ahead of him deliriously circled the bases
> toward home.
>
> Shay reached second base, the opposing shortstop ran to him, turned him
> in the direction of third base, and shouted, "Run to third!" As Shay
> rounded third, the boys from both teams were screaming, "Shay, run
> Home!" Shay ran to home, stepped on the plate, and was cheered as the
> hero who hit the "grand slam" and won the game for his team
>
>
> "That day," said the father softly with tears now rolling down his face,
> " the boys from both teams helped bring a piece of true love and
> humanity into this world."
>
> AND NOW A LITTLE FOOTNOTE TO THIS STORY: We all send thousands of jokes
> through the e-mail without a second thought, but when it comes to
> sending messages about life choices, people think twice about sharing.
>
> The crude, vulgar, and often obscene pass freely through cyberspace, but
> public discussion about decency is too often suppressed in our schools
> and workplaces.
>
> If you're thinking about forwarding this message chances are that you're
> probably sorting out the people on your address list that aren't the
> "appropriate ones to receive this type of message. Well, the person who
> sent you this believes that we all can make a difference. We all have
> thousands of opportunities every single day to help realize the "natural
> order of things." So many seemingly trivial interactions between two
> people present us with a choice: Do we pass along a little spark of
> love and humanity or do we pass up that opportunity, and leave the world
> a little bit colder in the process?
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 5:41:46 AM EST
Confused about the what would you do thing? None the less good story
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 5:45:37 AM EST
Great story!

I guess your supposed to be the pitcher. The pitcher could have easily struck him out, but instead he made this kids day a good day for him. Thats a champ in my book.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 5:47:57 AM EST
I am confused? Is Shay a zombie?

I read the story and I don't get it - I am a retard!
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 5:48:10 AM EST

Originally Posted By StariVojnik:
Great story!

I guess your supposed to be the pitcher. The pitcher could have easily struck him out, but instead he made this kids day a good day for him. Thats a champ in my book.


Well if the pitcher struck the kid out that gives the op team the right to kick his ass
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 5:48:41 AM EST

Originally Posted By Gartchen:
I am confused? Is Shay a zombie?

I read the story and I don't get it - I am a retard!


Bingo, right on the dot.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 5:48:59 AM EST
Shay is a Child with special needs you Zombie!
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 5:50:05 AM EST

Originally Posted By olyarms:

Originally Posted By StariVojnik:
Great story!

I guess your supposed to be the pitcher. The pitcher could have easily struck him out, but instead he made this kids day a good day for him. Thats a champ in my book.


Well if the pitcher struck the kid out that gives the op team the right to kick his ass




Hey this ain't hockey!
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 5:50:44 AM EST
so I guess you would have thrown me the high heat then ey Oly?

lol
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 5:51:12 AM EST
The question is: Do we forward this story to people who would appreiciate it, leaving out people who would read it and in your mind say, "What is this sissy shit?" OR just send it to everyone and hope it makes a difference.

Well done Student101.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 5:53:00 AM EST
{sniff} man good story! I think I'll take my kids out to play for awhile. maybe some baseball! Take care.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 5:53:41 AM EST

Originally Posted By Gartchen:
so I guess you would have thrown me the high heat then ey Oly?

lol


We would have got out the bats on your ass.

Oh sports used to be so much fun.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 5:58:00 AM EST

Originally Posted By Student101:


> "When not interfered with by outside influences, everything nature does
> is done with perfection. Yet my son, Shay, cannot learn things as other
> children do. He cannot understand things as other children do. Where
> is the natural order of things in my son?"



Obviously the prior assertion is wrong...
Nice heartwarming story tho. I don't get enough of those in my email, so I'm glad I can read them here too!

<­BR>



not....
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 6:06:06 AM EST
I'd let him get on base, but I don't know about letting him win the game.......
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 6:16:31 AM EST
How a society treats the least of it's members determines what kind of society it is. Germany in the late 30's and early 40's didnt treat the least very well.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 6:19:18 AM EST
I don't know what I would do because my short attention span did not allow me to finish reading past the first two sentences.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 7:56:15 AM EST
Cahin e-mail, designed to clog IT systems the world over. Delete immediately, do not forward.

They're designed to pull at your heart so you pass it on.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 8:00:01 AM EST
I didn't forward it, figured it was a good read for everyone here.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 8:00:27 AM EST
This IS a trap! Believe it.

Don't pass Jack crap on....what nonsense and for what reason?
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 8:07:59 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/5/2004 8:30:07 AM EST by Sierra_Hombre]
they were keeping score. if i was pitching, "shay" would have been hosed.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 8:09:44 AM EST
I would have beaned Shay and let him trot to 1st w/o having to patronize him.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 8:13:13 AM EST
Fucking cold day in hell before I'd let another team introduce substitutes in the middle of the 8th inning if I'm 6 runs ahead I can tell you that much.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 8:18:40 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 8:20:14 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/5/2004 8:20:45 AM EST by Kamikazi]
retard walks to the park, sees kids playing baseball, they get all gooey and play nice so he can score runs. both teams purposly play horrible to accomodate him.

Is that short enough
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 8:20:24 AM EST
I prefer my fairy tales to have dragons and damsels in distress in them, but it's a cute story nonetheless.

Link Posted: 10/5/2004 8:23:15 AM EST

Originally Posted By Dolomite:
Fucking cold day in hell before I'd let another team introduce substitutes in the middle of the 8th inning if I'm 6 runs ahead I can tell you that much.



Damn straight. Could it be that the retarded boy is not really retarded and the losing team uses him to tug at the hearts of the winning team.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 8:26:40 AM EST
I would have grabbed he ball, held it, then called a team meeting while he was running to first and voted on what to do.

I guess if the game didn't mean anything, then what the hell. But heres a story kinda the opposite...

I'm in men's hockey league at our local rink. It gets pretty competitive. If you're goalie doesn't show up you forfit the game. However, you still play for the fun of it. Our goalie didn't show up last game, so we had to forfit but we all still wanted to play. So we brought out the 'shooter tooter' and replaced the net. The other team, however, said that they wanted to shoot on their goalie for the first and third. We reluctantly accepted because it was our problem that our goalie didn't show up. However we still wanted to play a truthful game. Their goalie took our net and was fucking terrible. On some of the shots he would have had to had purposely let them by because anyone with the slightest bit of athletic talent could have stopped it. And that pissed me off. Everytime he got scored on (7 goals in the first period!) I would scream shit at him, mostly trying to embarress him into actually playing. TTTT, I wasn't being descrete about it either. I'd shout whatever I had to say at the top of my lungs.

I know it wasn't fair that our goalie didn't show up but then again it wasn't fair that the other teams goalie wasn't being truthful in his performance for us. What would you guys have done?

We did try calling our goalie, yes.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 8:28:48 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/5/2004 8:33:30 AM EST by BB]
"What would you do in this situation?"

Delete the email.


"The true value of any inspirational tale lies not in its veracity (or lack thereof) but in its ability to move those who read it to improve some facet of themselves. As with many other glurges, we find this story's premise a poor one, and its message one likely to do more harm than good.

What to make of an incitement to bestow upon the disabled to a pat on the head instead of granting them acceptance for who they are, even when that means accepting the limitations placed upon them by their infirmities? Has a disabled child who has been conditioned to believe he's good at baseball somehow been helped, or has he been set up for a greater hurt when he comes to realize he's been made the object of pity and an accomplishment he'd been praising himself for was just a sham?

Not everyone reacts well to having the rules of life changed on them in mid-game, so to speak. An experience from my sister's pre-school days might help illustrate this point.

As was my sister's wont, some mornings she would toddle after our brother when he headed off to school. She was always greeted warmly by the teacher and set down with crayons and paper to draw pictures (a ruse to keep her quiet) while the rest of the children went on with their lessons. When she proudly presented her drawings to the teacher, they never failed to earn gold stars, sometimes even rows of them! (According to our brother, she was never shy about demanding more stars. Loudly.) Her interruptions and demands were always immediately addressed, and the class learned to regard her as a lovable, if annoying, mascot who showed up every now and then but mercifully never stayed long. ("But always too long," our mortified brother would report.) When she tired of scribbling, singing, and cavorting, my dear sis would toddle back home, secure in the knowledge that this mysterious "school" thing was all sorts of fun, and it would be even more fun when she was grown up enough to be part of it officially.

That view changed on her very first day as a real student. Riding on the bus was fun, but nobody acted all that delighted to see her when she got to school. Worse, there were no gold stars for anything she did. When she piped up to sing a song, the teacher actually shushed her. She was told to stay in her seat instead of running around the room as she usually did. When she demanded crayons, she was told it was time to do lessons and that in future she had to put her hand up when she wanted something instead of just screaming it out. Confused and fed up, she tried to leave, but the teacher sat her back down! She was then told she couldn't leave, that she had to stay there for the whole day. Worse, she was told that if she didn't behave, she'd be taken to the principal. (She wasn't exactly sure what that was, but it sounded impressively ominous.)

That confused little girl grew up to be a young lady who dropped out of school in eighth grade. She never got over the idea that teachers lived to pick on her and that all these rules they came up with served no purpose other than to make her life miserable. Possibly a different beginning might have led to a different outcome: a brilliant, creative girl going on to complete high school and maybe even university. Maybe. But we'll never know because these other what-might-have-beens were killed with kindness before they even had their chance.

As amusing a story as my sister's experience may be, the pain she experienced was real. What that child went through shouldn't be visited upon another, especially upon one already burdened with limitations. Kindness is all well and good, but not when the expression of it sets up the recipient for greater harm later. The less abled don't require our pity -- they want acceptance, to be seen as viable and valuable members of the world. Lying down for them doesn't accomplish this; it just reinforces the belief they can't succeed on their own.

Can a disabled child hit a baseball as well as a perfectly-abled one? No. But can that same child learn to work within his disabilities to the point of achieving real accomplishments he can take honest pride in? Absolutely. And that beats all the pity-driven home runs in the world.

Barbara "killed with kindness" Mikkelson"

www.snopes.com/glurge/chush.htm
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 8:33:47 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/5/2004 9:13:28 AM EST by EricTheHun]
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 9:12:32 AM EST
Good story, sound like some parents are doing a great job.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 9:51:22 AM EST
Sure is! And for those of you Iron Hearts who feel that winning a lousy baseball game (which wasn't a serious game to begin with) need some growing up to do.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 10:19:14 AM EST
So then this is why we have affirmative action? Screw that lovey-dovey crap. Part of Good Sportsmanship is also how you deal with defeat, and your own limitations. If the story were true the kid should have been insulted the other kids found him such a tard, and blatently had to fix the game for him. I swear, none of you ever believed in leveling the playing field for anyone else.
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