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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 4/2/2006 6:26:24 AM EDT
I've decided that I need to run some network cable through my new house I'm having built. What type of cable should I use? What is the most "up-to-date" cable out there for this? I don't want to run all this cable and then have it obsolete in a couple years.

Thanks,
Kris
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 6:29:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 6:39:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Paul:
Cat 6 is good for gigabyte.


+1
Or just stop being a tightwad and get a wireless router
or both.

FWIW:
CAT 5/6 wire is around .50 cents a foot ( last time I checked)
Use wall outlets (easy to wire)
ROUTE THEM FAR AS YOU CAN FROM ELEC. wires (noise)

You can make your own crossover and patch cords fairly easy too
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 6:41:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2006 6:44:58 AM EDT by Rock7]
Don't waste the money for cat 6. It's basically just a "Fad".

Cat 5e will do gigabit just fine.

Gigabyte networks are not for home use unless you are a millionare
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 6:41:57 AM EDT
Get your electriction to run conduit for it, that way when (not if) but when that cable gets obsolite all you have to do is tie the new cable to the end of the old cable and pull it though
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 6:44:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Outsider_10fp:

Originally Posted By Paul:
Cat 6 is good for gigabyte.


+1
Or just stop being a tightwad and get a wireless router
or both.

FWIW:
CAT 5/6 wire is around .50 cents a foot ( last time I checked)
Use wall outlets (easy to wire)
ROUTE THEM FAR AS YOU CAN FROM ELEC. wires (noise)

You can make your own crossover and patch cords fairly easy too



No wireless, its slow compaired to wired and if you don't set it up right, your neighbor could end up useing your own network for what ever he feels like.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 6:47:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By UmpaLumpa:
Get your electriction to run conduit for it, that way when (not if) but when that cable gets obsolite all you have to do is tie the new cable to the end of the old cable and pull it though



Link Posted: 4/2/2006 6:51:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2006 6:57:20 AM EDT by rottrob]
I second CAT5E. But would also have all runs go to a smart panel or other central location so you could install a router and have more than one high speed outlet(RJ45).
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 6:55:17 AM EDT
Cat5e is fine for your new house.

Don't wire separately for phone. Use the network jacks for your phone connections too. Have the wiring guy puch down one end of a cable in the phone wiring block and the other end with an RJ-45 connector. You'll just plug the RJ-45 end into the jack location you want your phone. That allows you to use the jacks for more than one purpose. Have the guy punch down enough cables to the wiring block to handle all of your phones.

Have at least 2 jacks per location. You can put more into locations you know you'll have your main computer, but have at least two elsewhere. At my house, I wired one location for each wall, and sometimes more if the wall was long enough. I'd also recommend that you wire your TV/entertainment center. More devices will use network in the future.

Have your Internet connection pulled to your main wiring location. You can then connect to the Internet from anywhere in your house.

Wireless is an option if you want to use a mobile laptop, but I'd still get wired locations throughout your house.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 6:59:01 AM EDT
6 or 5E

If you do wireless AS WELL as wired, make sure you secure it....

As an example of what can happen, let's just say that back home, in addition to my secure wireless I can see 4 unsecured connections from my house.... And if I wanted to, I could suddenly hop on and start downloading a couple gigs of BitTorrent shit... And all you'd know would be 'WTF the internet is slow today'....

Fortunately, I had better things to do, and a faster line than my neighbors....

Oh, also make sure that you tell your computer(s) that are wireless to only connect to your router otherwise they may 'roam' and you may inadvertantly be on someone else's line...
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 7:03:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By UmpaLumpa:
Get your electriction to run conduit for it, that way when (not if) but when that cable gets obsolite all you have to do is tie the new cable to the end of the old cable and pull it though



Not cheap, but a great idea if you can swing it. Have him leave you a pull rope in it too so you can add another cable without removing the original if needed. For now Cat5E will do anything you need it to.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 7:13:24 AM EDT
Kris,

Don't even bother paying to have it run unless you have a friend that will do it for steak and beers. Run with 802.11g wireless. Cables at home are for neanderthals.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 7:22:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Outsider_10fp:

ROUTE THEM FAR AS YOU CAN FROM ELEC. wires (noise)

You can make your own crossover and patch cords fairly easy too



i.e. don't make long parallel runs right next to a power wire. perpendicular is ok, going 8 feet down a wall to a box hasn't caused me any problems either.

Wire at least two jacks on opposite walls. I wired my MIL's new house, putting the jacks where I would want them, and wouldn't you know it I don't think I got one right I tried to get some input, but "whatever you think" leaves a little too much to the imagination.

I ran two cat 5e's to each box. cable is cheap, running two is as easy as running one, and might someday save having a switch or hub (a networked laser printer and a pc... or a pc and a place for a laptop)

Run all your telephone lines and video cables to the wiring closet too, but I bet you are. That's already come in real handy. I got a cheap RF modulator and hooked to her PC, now she can watch the PC output (streaming video, DVDs, whatever) on channel 3 anywhere in the house.

I don't think there's any point in putting fibre optic in a home, unless you have a very specific application in mind. Cat 5e will run gigabit ethernet fine. I have yet to see a server that will come close to saturating a gig connection, so I think 10 gig ethernet will be for aggregated network links and datacenters (not your home

If you want to get really fancy, run smurf tubes (those blue flexible conduits) at least on the outside walls. Everything else you can upgrade later without too much trouble.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 7:29:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By sgthoskins:
Kris,

Don't even bother paying to have it run unless you have a friend that will do it for steak and beers. Run with 802.11g wireless. Cables at home are for neanderthals.



I'm going to disagree, I've had the most prob's with wireless, in fact I have had zero problems with wired but many with wirless. Plus, most computers don't come with a wireless hookup, they all come with ethernet ports.

If you have a basment or crawl, have them run "Smurf tube" down to the crawl. It's only 18'' per run, it won't add much cost at all, then you will be ready for fiber.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 7:39:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By postpostban:

Originally Posted By sgthoskins:
Kris,

Don't even bother paying to have it run unless you have a friend that will do it for steak and beers. Run with 802.11g wireless. Cables at home are for neanderthals.



I'm going to disagree, I've had the most prob's with wireless, in fact I have had zero problems with wired but many with wirless. Plus, most computers don't come with a wireless hookup, they all come with ethernet ports.

If you have a basment or crawl, have them run "Smurf tube" down to the crawl. It's only 18'' per run, it won't add much cost at all, then you will be ready for fiber.



Ahh ha! Run a cross over between floors and a wireless switch at each end. I don't know what anyone would be running in the house that is going use anything over 50mb.

Has anyone actually monitored the bandwidth usage for a home network with 3 or 4 pc's? It's not much, besides the bottleneck will always be the internet provider and unless you plan on brining in a T3 to the house it's not going to matter. By the time technology allows for 50-100mb home internet access the wireless will already be ahead of it.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 8:24:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By sgthoskins:

Originally Posted By postpostban:

Originally Posted By sgthoskins:
Kris,

Don't even bother paying to have it run unless you have a friend that will do it for steak and beers. Run with 802.11g wireless. Cables at home are for neanderthals.



I'm going to disagree, I've had the most prob's with wireless, in fact I have had zero problems with wired but many with wirless. Plus, most computers don't come with a wireless hookup, they all come with ethernet ports.

If you have a basment or crawl, have them run "Smurf tube" down to the crawl. It's only 18'' per run, it won't add much cost at all, then you will be ready for fiber.



Ahh ha! Run a cross over between floors and a wireless switch at each end. I don't know what anyone would be running in the house that is going use anything over 50mb.

Has anyone actually monitored the bandwidth usage for a home network with 3 or 4 pc's? It's not much, besides the bottleneck will always be the internet provider and unless you plan on brining in a T3 to the house it's not going to matter. By the time technology allows for 50-100mb home internet access the wireless will already be ahead of it.



Tranfering large files, home filesever streaming audio and video plus surfing can add up quick. Add too that you never know what device's may need a network connection in the future.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 9:03:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BigTater:

Originally Posted By sgthoskins:

Originally Posted By postpostban:

Originally Posted By sgthoskins:
Kris,

Don't even bother paying to have it run unless you have a friend that will do it for steak and beers. Run with 802.11g wireless. Cables at home are for neanderthals.



I'm going to disagree, I've had the most prob's with wireless, in fact I have had zero problems with wired but many with wirless. Plus, most computers don't come with a wireless hookup, they all come with ethernet ports.

If you have a basment or crawl, have them run "Smurf tube" down to the crawl. It's only 18'' per run, it won't add much cost at all, then you will be ready for fiber.



Ahh ha! Run a cross over between floors and a wireless switch at each end. I don't know what anyone would be running in the house that is going use anything over 50mb.

Has anyone actually monitored the bandwidth usage for a home network with 3 or 4 pc's? It's not much, besides the bottleneck will always be the internet provider and unless you plan on brining in a T3 to the house it's not going to matter. By the time technology allows for 50-100mb home internet access the wireless will already be ahead of it.



Tranfering large files, home filesever streaming audio and video plus surfing can add up quick. Add too that you never know what device's may need a network connection in the future.



I did see the kitchen of the future had every appliance wired with cat5. You could start dinner from your office desk 30 miles away.

Now if I can just figure out how to wire the family of illegals living in my garage to cook my steaks before I get home I'd be all set.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 9:05:31 AM EDT
220v
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 10:17:09 AM EDT
If you want the most up to date, it's fiber optic or Cat6.

If you just want something that is going to work for years to come, I suggest in each room;

RG-6 for cable TV
Cat5e for phones
Cat5e for data

Assuming that all the walls in your new house are open, I also suggest running stereo to each room also. You want;

Cat5e to a wall plate new the light switch in each room (from the stereo)
16/4 wire to each wall plate (or you can run 2 pair of 16/2 from the stereo and loop it through the wall plate to each speaker)
16/2 wire to each speaker in the room from the wall plate

Also wire your main TV room for surround sound (7.1 is the latest thing, so you might want want to wire for 7 speakers now.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 10:21:06 AM EDT
Tag
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 10:24:52 AM EDT
Most has been said.

Cat 5e is fine for gigabit. Cat 6 if you want the latest in wired. Fiber if you don't mind the increased cost in cable and end hardware.

It's more expensive than the wiring, but as a previous poster said, run conduit with a free pullcord for each room. At the very least, with conduit, if you upgrade to fiber or whatever the next cabling revolution is, it'll be a super easy swap. As several posters have said, avoid close proximity to power and terminate with wall plates and jacks.

Do not make your own patch cables. High quality cables are available for a few dollars each (not from the office store).

Terminate all your connections at a patch panel preferably in the same area as all the other personal/entertainment/phone wiring. it will make your life much easier down the road.

Wireless is for mobile devices or cases where cabling is not an option. If you use it for laptops or handhelds, secure the hell out of it.

Brass
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 10:28:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By brassburn:
Most has been said.

Cat 5e is fine for gigabit. Cat 6 if you want the latest in wired. Fiber if you don't mind the increased cost in cable and end hardware.

It's more expensive than the wiring, but as a previous poster said, run conduit with a free pullcord for each room. At the very least, with conduit, if you upgrade to fiber or whatever the next cabling revolution is, it'll be a super easy swap. As several posters have said, avoid close proximity to power and terminate with wall plates and jacks.

Do not make your own patch cables. High quality cables are available for a few dollars each (not from the office store).

Terminate all your connections at a patch panel preferably in the same area as all the other personal/entertainment/phone wiring. it will make your life much easier down the road.

Wireless is for mobile devices or cases where cabling is not an option. If you use it for laptops or handhelds, secure the hell out of it.

Brass



Very good advice.
I'm wired with Cat5e for inside my home(3xPCs, X-Box, printer), but I'm posting from the garage via wireless (802.11b).
128bit WEP (until I replace with Cisco LEAP).
MAC address filtering
SSID broadcast OFF
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 10:28:59 AM EDT
Wireless.. with a high gain directional antenna to blast through the walls at your "Access Point" will work for 802.11g..

The regular little antenna on the little linksys and D-Link routers are only good for a few yards...

I took down my hi-gain antenna and went back to regular cat6 when I got Vonage.. Wireless seems to interfere with it... don't know why.. but I was having some Vonage sound quality problems.. their website said it could be due to a wireless network.. and sure enough.. it was.. not a clue as to why...

Link Posted: 4/2/2006 10:43:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2006 10:44:02 AM EDT by Avalon01]
Cat 6 or 5e will be fine. I have Cat 6 in my house.

If you go wireless, make sure to SECURE IT! When ever I travel with my laptop, I'm never far rome somebody who has a Linksys wireless router wide open.

Makes life easy when I travel however. I just park infront of who ever has the open router, fire up the laptop, send a few e-mail messages back home and then I'm on my way.

Av.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 11:01:13 AM EDT
hell get some cat 6 shielded or 25 pair cable.
make sure you buy amp netconnect,made by tyco electronics.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 11:07:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Avalon01:
Cat 6 or 5e will be fine. I have Cat 6 in my house.

If you go wireless, make sure to SECURE IT! When ever I travel with my laptop, I'm never far rome somebody who has a Linksys wireless router wide open.

Makes life easy when I travel however. I just park infront of who ever has the open router, fire up the laptop, send a few e-mail messages back home and then I'm on my way.

Av.



This is VERY true. As I stated before I woudln't suggest wireless, wired is faster and alot more secure. But if you do go wireless make sure to change the default password and DO NOT USE WEP use WPA.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 11:08:04 AM EDT
5e
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 11:13:20 AM EDT
He's having a house built... why even bother with wireless?

Run Cat 5e or Cat 6 through your house. Buy a central wiring system from Lowes or Creepy depot (there is better stuff out there, but if you want cheap their cabinets aren't bad) and run your wiring to it.

Pick somewhere that will be centralized but accessible for the wiring closet. Try to keep from outside walls - insulation makes it a bitch to add wires if you need to later.

Be sure to buy Low Voltage gang boxes - they are orange and do not have backs, which makes adding wires so much easier (I wish these were available when I wired my house at rough-in -- Adding wires now to sealed gang boxes is such a PITA).

From my experiences: Run more outlets than you need. You'll find out later that you wish you had. Everything is going high tech, you might want to include outlets for where the fridge will be, where the microwave will be, hell, even just a free network port in the kitchen.

If you want to run really good video cable, run RG6 quad shield. It maybe overkill, but will keep out any unwanted signals most of the time.

I would suggest running at least two video cable drops to every major room and one to every minor room.

Phone jacks, just use plain Cat 3 cable. Phone lines just need one drop - there is three pair in there and phone service only uses 1 pair. If you ever need more, you have two extra pairs.

you may want to get some long staples and halfway staple the cables down on the walls (do not staple all the way, just sort of as a guide to keep the cables from shifting around while sheetrockers do their thing.

Let the electrician wire before you do. If you have something set up the way you like before he comes in, he'll fuck it up.
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