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Posted: 7/20/2008 1:06:00 PM EST
I am not too good at figuring out patterns. Some of them look really similar to me when I google it. This is in NW Florida. He is about 18-24 inches long.
Definately no rattle.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:06:34 PM EST
Looks like a copper head?
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:07:31 PM EST
copperhead
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:08:17 PM EST
Copperhead.

Don't try to pick it up.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:08:19 PM EST
That's not a copperhead, it is a cottonmouth.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:08:21 PM EST
one that needs to die
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:09:09 PM EST

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:
That's not a copperhead, it is a cottonmouth.


i agree, but either way don't touch the fucker.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:10:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 1:12:26 PM EST by DV8]
That sir is a Cottonmouth. Kill it with extreme prejudice.


Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:13:28 PM EST
It's one or the other. Looks big for a Copperhead.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:14:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 1:16:48 PM EST by hdbint]
Agkistrodon piscivorus conanti

AKA Florida Cottonmouth

ETA: One that needs killin.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:14:42 PM EST
It is definitely not a copperhead, it is a cottonmouth.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:15:45 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:16:04 PM EST
Well, it's gone now. It slithered out the door. I came in to load up some bird shot and he boogied. Eyes will be peeled.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:16:47 PM EST
opossum
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:17:06 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 1:17:33 PM EST by struckzb]
I stand corrected. I thought Cottonmouths were a little darker in color.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:17:26 PM EST
There are no endangered snakes in Florida, there are no threatened snake species in Florida.....there is NO shortage of snakes in Florida.

If you see one just kill the fucker. There are ten more waiting to take his place.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:18:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 1:19:02 PM EST by 70satvert]
I recommend 1 round of .22lr to the dome.

Here's my rattler from last weekend.




ETA: I see you let it escape.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:19:39 PM EST

Originally Posted By struckzb:
I stand corrected. I thought Cottonmouths were a little darker in color.


They can be almost black. Kind of like an oreo I guess.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:20:42 PM EST

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:
There are no endangered snakes in Florida, there are no threatened snake species in Florida.....there is NO shortage of snakes in Florida.

If you see one just kill the fucker. There are ten more waiting to take his place.


Not correct.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:22:47 PM EST

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:
There are no endangered snakes in Florida, there are no threatened snake species in Florida.....there is NO shortage of snakes in Florida.

If you see one just kill the fucker. There are ten more waiting to take his place.


Not correct.



No?

Unless you're talking about that one damn water snake there are no threatened or endangered snakes in Florida, and certainly not any venomous ones.

Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:23:41 PM EST

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:
There are no endangered snakes in Florida, there are no threatened snake species in Florida.....there is NO shortage of snakes in Florida.

If you see one just kill the fucker. There are ten more waiting to take his place.


Not correct.


Indigo snakes are pretty rare.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:24:57 PM EST
+1 on being a cottonmouth.

Here is a pic I took of a Copperhead a few weeks ago on a hike. Note the lighter color, around here anyway. (Didn't have the camera with me, Blackberry had to fill in...)
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:25:05 PM EST
Article


Florida Banded Watersnake





Scientific name: Nerodia fasciata pictiventris

Description: Adults average from 24-42 inches (61-106.7 cm). The record is 62.5 inches (158.8 cm). Stout bodied snake with broad black, brown, or red crossbands over most of body. The lighter narrower bands are tan, gray, or reddish and may contain a dark spot on the side. The light bands may be broken by a black strip down the middle of the back. Crossbands may be obscured as snake darkens with age. Belly is creamy yellow with wormlike red or black markings. Scales are keeled and there are 23-27 dorsal scale rows at midbody. The pupil is round. A dark stripe extends from the eye to the angle of the jaw. Juveniles have very clear red or black crossbands on light background.

Range: In Florida, this subspecies is found throughout the peninsula, excluding the Florida Keys. Outside the state it occurs in extreme southeastern Georgia and has been introduced to Brownsville, Texas.

Habitat: The Florida banded watersnake can be found in nearly all freshwater habitats, preferring the shallow waters of swamps, marshes, ponds, lakes, streams, and rivers.

Comments: . When threatened, the Florida banded watersnake defends itself by biting and smearing its tormentor with a foul smelling musk. Active mainly at night, but may be found during the day sunning on banks or on vegetation hanging over the water. Feeds on live or dead fish, frogs, and aquatic invertebrates. The Florida banded watersnake bears live young. Mating occurs mid-winter to spring and litters of 20-30 young are born in late spring through summer. The young are 7.5-10.5 inches (19-26.6 cm) at birth.

Comparison with other species: The brown watersnake (Nerodia taxispilota) has squarish dorsal blotches along its entire body. The midland water snake (Nerodia sipedon pleuralis) has fewer than 30 darker brown crossbands near the neck, which break up into alternating blotches further down the body, and the belly is yellowish marked with two rows of half moons.

Florida banded watersnakes are harmless, though they have a mouth full of teeth and will bite viciously to defend themselves. Because they are found around bodies of water, watersnakes often are killed in the mistaken belief that they are the venomous cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus conanti). Since cottonmouths can easily be distinguished from watersnakes there is no excuse for killing watersnakes out of confusion. The cottonmouth has a triangular shaped head and a vertical pupil. If the head is viewed from above, the eyes of cottonmouths cannot be seen while the eyes of watersnakes are visible; cottonmouths have elliptical pupils and watersnakes have round pupils; and cottonmouths have a facial pit between the nostril and the eye, while watersnakes have none.


Juvenile Florida banded watersnake.

Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:26:09 PM EST

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:
There are no endangered snakes in Florida, there are no threatened snake species in Florida.....there is NO shortage of snakes in Florida.

If you see one just kill the fucker. There are ten more waiting to take his place.


Not correct.



No?

Unless you're talking about that one damn water snake there are no threatened or endangered snakes in Florida, and certainly not any venomous ones.



Yeah from what I have heard FL is great for snakes. In fact people pet pythons are getting out and establishing breeding colonies, and eating everything they can in the meantime.

Is this snake in or around your property? Cause if it was I would definately kill it.

Do Cottonmouths den? Is so that could be a really bad thing.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:26:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 1:27:08 PM EST by cbsaf]
Whatever it was it just came around the corner of the house and met Mr. 870. DEAD. Pics to follow.

Head didn't look like that watersnake.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:26:36 PM EST
LOLsnake???


Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:27:17 PM EST
I was on a float trip with a buddy of mine, we stopped and decided to wander up a creek to look for a cave. My buddy caught a huge cottonmouth with his bare hands. I asked him what he planned on doing with it since the are venomous. He looked at me like this . After checking it out for a while he just gave it a toss into the weeds. He's pretty crazy, but has handled a lot of snakes. If he had been bit though we would have had to hike back to the canoe and then paddle quite a few miles to my truck then make a couple of hour drive to a hospital. It wouldn't have turned out well.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:27:39 PM EST
water moccasin. Copperheads bands are usually a little more shaped like a hershey kiss while a moccasin bands are a little more squared. Look pretty damn similar though. Either way, poisonus.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:27:43 PM EST

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:
There are no endangered snakes in Florida, there are no threatened snake species in Florida.....there is NO shortage of snakes in Florida.

If you see one just kill the fucker. There are ten more waiting to take his place.


Not correct.



No?

Unless you're talking about that one damn water snake there are no threatened or endangered snakes in Florida, and certainly not any venomous ones.



Eastern indigo snake, short-tailed snake, and Atlantic salt-marsh snake just off the top of my head. I'd also be surprised if rainbow snakes weren't protected. Eastern diamondbacks will likely make the list eventually.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:28:42 PM EST

Originally Posted By Jrock82:

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:
There are no endangered snakes in Florida, there are no threatened snake species in Florida.....there is NO shortage of snakes in Florida.

If you see one just kill the fucker. There are ten more waiting to take his place.


Not correct.



No?

Unless you're talking about that one damn water snake there are no threatened or endangered snakes in Florida, and certainly not any venomous ones.



Yeah from what I have heard FL is great for snakes. In fact people pet pythons are getting out and establishing breeding colonies, and eating everything they can in the meantime.

Is this snake in or around your property? Cause if it was I would definately kill it.

Do Cottonmouths den? Is so that could be a really bad thing.


Cottonmouths do not den up.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:29:05 PM EST
tag for pics!
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:29:10 PM EST

Originally Posted By cbsaf:
Whatever it was it just came around the corner of the house and met Mr. 870. DEAD. Pics to follow.

Head didn't look like that watersnake.


Cool. It was definitely a cotton mouth (water moccassin.)

It would FUCK YOU UP!
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:29:37 PM EST

Originally Posted By ChinoUSMC:
Article


Florida Banded Watersnake



www.flmnh.ufl.edu/natsci/herpetology/fl-guide/bm-nfpic01.jpg

Scientific name: Nerodia fasciata pictiventris

Description: Adults average from 24-42 inches (61-106.7 cm). The record is 62.5 inches (158.8 cm). Stout bodied snake with broad black, brown, or red crossbands over most of body. The lighter narrower bands are tan, gray, or reddish and may contain a dark spot on the side. The light bands may be broken by a black strip down the middle of the back. Crossbands may be obscured as snake darkens with age. Belly is creamy yellow with wormlike red or black markings. Scales are keeled and there are 23-27 dorsal scale rows at midbody. The pupil is round. A dark stripe extends from the eye to the angle of the jaw. Juveniles have very clear red or black crossbands on light background.

Range: In Florida, this subspecies is found throughout the peninsula, excluding the Florida Keys. Outside the state it occurs in extreme southeastern Georgia and has been introduced to Brownsville, Texas.

Habitat: The Florida banded watersnake can be found in nearly all freshwater habitats, preferring the shallow waters of swamps, marshes, ponds, lakes, streams, and rivers.

Comments: . When threatened, the Florida banded watersnake defends itself by biting and smearing its tormentor with a foul smelling musk. Active mainly at night, but may be found during the day sunning on banks or on vegetation hanging over the water. Feeds on live or dead fish, frogs, and aquatic invertebrates. The Florida banded watersnake bears live young. Mating occurs mid-winter to spring and litters of 20-30 young are born in late spring through summer. The young are 7.5-10.5 inches (19-26.6 cm) at birth.

Comparison with other species: The brown watersnake (Nerodia taxispilota) has squarish dorsal blotches along its entire body. The midland water snake (Nerodia sipedon pleuralis) has fewer than 30 darker brown crossbands near the neck, which break up into alternating blotches further down the body, and the belly is yellowish marked with two rows of half moons.

Florida banded watersnakes are harmless, though they have a mouth full of teeth and will bite viciously to defend themselves. Because they are found around bodies of water, watersnakes often are killed in the mistaken belief that they are the venomous cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus conanti). Since cottonmouths can easily be distinguished from watersnakes there is no excuse for killing watersnakes out of confusion. The cottonmouth has a triangular shaped head and a vertical pupil. If the head is viewed from above, the eyes of cottonmouths cannot be seen while the eyes of watersnakes are visible; cottonmouths have elliptical pupils and watersnakes have round pupils; and cottonmouths have a facial pit between the nostril and the eye, while watersnakes have none.

www.flmnh.ufl.edu/natsci/herpetology/fl-guide/nfpic01.jpg
Juvenile Florida banded watersnake.



That ain't it OPs snake is a cottonmouth.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:29:43 PM EST

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:
That's not a copperhead, it is a cottonmouth.


This!

- Clint
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:31:17 PM EST
tag for pics of Mr. 870 damage.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:33:54 PM EST
Cottonmouth. I'd kill the bastard- they don't taste half bad.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:36:30 PM EST

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:
There are no endangered snakes in Florida, there are no threatened snake species in Florida.....there is NO shortage of snakes in Florida.

If you see one just kill the fucker. There are ten more waiting to take his place.


Not correct.



No?

Unless you're talking about that one damn water snake there are no threatened or endangered snakes in Florida, and certainly not any venomous ones.



Eastern indigo snake, short-tailed snake, and Atlantic salt-marsh snake just off the top of my head. I'd also be surprised if rainbow snakes weren't protected. Eastern diamondbacks will likely make the list eventually.




Hey ya know you were right....these are the endangered or threatened species of snake in Florida....


key ringneck snake
Eastern indigo snake
red rat snake
Atlantic salt marsh water snake
Florida pine snake
short-tailed snake
Florida brown snake
rim rock crowned snake
Florida ribbon snake



And I still say kill at will. Fuck a snake.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:37:03 PM EST

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:
There are no endangered snakes in Florida, there are no threatened snake species in Florida.....there is NO shortage of snakes in Florida.

If you see one just kill the fucker. There are ten more waiting to take his place.


Not correct.



No?

Unless you're talking about that one damn water snake there are no threatened or endangered snakes in Florida, and certainly not any venomous ones.



Eastern indigo snake, short-tailed snake, and Atlantic salt-marsh snake just off the top of my head. I'd also be surprised if rainbow snakes weren't protected. Eastern diamondbacks will likely make the list eventually.


Good. They can all die.

IBTPTSSAIFTE (in before the people that say snakes are important for the ecosystem)
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:37:24 PM EST
Pin its head down with a stick, grab it right behind its head and drown it.

Makes a nice skin and then eat it
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:38:34 PM EST
I shot a cottonmouth last week in my garden, I almost stepped on him before running back in the house and grabbing the AR....one less cottonmouth
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:38:49 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:39:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 1:44:47 PM EST by Windustsearch]

Originally Posted By bwheeler111:

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:

Originally Posted By MrMojoRising:
There are no endangered snakes in Florida, there are no threatened snake species in Florida.....there is NO shortage of snakes in Florida.

If you see one just kill the fucker. There are ten more waiting to take his place.


Not correct.



No?

Unless you're talking about that one damn water snake there are no threatened or endangered snakes in Florida, and certainly not any venomous ones.



Eastern indigo snake, short-tailed snake, and Atlantic salt-marsh snake just off the top of my head. I'd also be surprised if rainbow snakes weren't protected. Eastern diamondbacks will likely make the list eventually.


Good. They can all die.

IBTPTSSAIFTE (in before the people that say snakes are important for the ecosystem)


I am sure you are about to present us all the biology papers and journal articles that demonstrate that they aren't.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:44:12 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:45:23 PM EST
Yep, still a cottonmouth.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:46:37 PM EST
Growing up as a kid in Louisiana and Georgia, I remember killing Water Moccasins with 20 gauge shotguns during the summer. Man were those things aggressive, I have been chased by more than one.

Snakes are really important to the ecosystem, gators, opossums, coons and other critters eat the shit out of dead ones.

BTW, I have no problem helping the endangered snakes toward their end goal...they apparently were not hardy enough to make the cut.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:47:11 PM EST

Originally Posted By cbsaf:
img.photobucket.com/albums/v324/cbsaf/P1010014.jpg


The rare headless copperhead!
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:47:15 PM EST

Originally Posted By DV8:
That sir is a Cottonmouth. Kill it with extreme prejudice.

i3.photobucket.com/albums/y82/DVR9/cottonmouth3666a.jpg

then clean it and cook it
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:48:09 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 3:11:07 PM EST by 308Sako]
Pit Viper = your death or his

No, I don't know a damn thing about snakes... and wish I knew less!
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:48:35 PM EST

Originally Posted By cbsaf:
img.photobucket.com/albums/v324/cbsaf/P1010014.jpg


Damn.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:49:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By 308Sako:
Pit Viper = your death or his


Not correct.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:50:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 1:52:08 PM EST by Tolip]
One that needs a hole

ETA: ... and has a rather large new hole
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