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Posted: 9/1/2009 9:43:28 PM EST
I want to get back into running as I was a year ago (approx. 10mi/week, long distance and drills). Is it worth the extra money to get "real" running shoes i.e. Brooks? Or will I be alright sticking with Asics and the like?
Link Posted: 9/1/2009 11:20:39 PM EST
pearl izumi - if you can find them

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 9/2/2009 1:47:28 AM EST
Asics aren't real running shoes? Most of the major brands are fine. Personally, I don't care much for Nike or New Balance, but Asics, Brooks, Mizuno, Saucony, and even Addidas (some of their new shoes are shockingly good). I also have a pair of Pearl Izumi shoes. They are nice - relatively new to the game, but their cycling clothing has really improved in quality of late.

Most important is to go to a real running store and have them recommend something to you. If the shoe is a bit pricier than what you could get it for elsewhere, but the first pair from the dedicated running store and go online for subsequent pairs. I'm willing to pay a bit more to support the local store because I like having their expertise to draw upon when I need it as well as the ability to try shoes on before I buy.
Link Posted: 9/2/2009 6:57:19 AM EST
Asics are the best! At least my Gel-Kayanos are. Get fitted if you can, or at least check out some of the home test you can use to determine arch type, etc. at Runner's World:

http://www.runnersworld.com/video/1,8052,s6-4-0-4,00.html?bcpid=2891005001&bclid=1716449631&bctid=16474217001

But you do need a good pair of dedicated running shoes to take care of your feet, knees, shins, etc..
Link Posted: 9/2/2009 7:01:56 AM EST
10 miles a week? Is that what you meant? That's not enough really to drop a bunch of cash on expensive shoes....

I've become a fan of minimalist shoes like the Nike Free 3.0 and Puma H-Streets...goes against poplular belief, but I like them a lot. If you're running A LOT or really long distance it's probably not for you though.
I've used both of those types of shoes for runs up to 6 miles with no problem... (I'm NOT built like a runner either at about 5'9" 180)
Link Posted: 9/2/2009 7:22:13 AM EST
When I was running, I used Brooks.
Link Posted: 9/2/2009 8:14:53 AM EST
Go to a store that specializes in running shoes. Someplace where the workers run...not Dicks, Academy, or any other place where some high school kid just brings you a box out of the back. I used to swear by New Balance b/c they are made in the USA...well at least the 992 series that I was wearing were. I had all kinds of knee problems. I went to a real running store. The guy looked at my old NBs and watched me run just a little bit and put me into the Mizuno Wave Nirvana 4. Three pairs and two marathons later I DONT have ANY of the the knee problems I had before. YMMV
Link Posted: 9/2/2009 9:25:12 AM EST
I swear by brooks.
On the tail end of my 4th pair (1 pair of 'addiction' followed with 3 pairs of 'Beast')
I have never had a blister, a foot injury, or any other ergonomic related injury since running on brooks.
Tried some other brands before them...always led to problems.
I pronate and I typically weigh in at around 200lbs give or take...for a heavier runner with reasonably flat feet the Brooks Beast model gives me more than enough arch support - I have gotten at least 500 miles out of each pair...almost 750 on the last ones.

With all that said, the best shoes are the ones that work for you.
Everyone swore by NB when I started running so I tried them.....just awful experiences...real bad blisters as well as major knee problems related to the way I was landing. I changed nothing but the shoes and the issues went completely away.

Could be that I made subconscious changes to my ergonomics / stride....could be that the Broooks shoes was just a better fit for me.

Bottom line....yes....it is absolutely worth the extra money to get the right shoes.
Try 6 weeks of physical therapy for patella tendonitis as a result of high miles on bad shoes and then ask yourself if it was worth it to save a few bucks on good gear
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 5:36:37 PM EST
Anybody else love the Pearl Izumi ads? I am tempted to buy the shoes just because of the ad campaign "We encourage runners to do other runners. Breed like an animal, run like an animal" or something like that
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 8:08:27 PM EST
Originally Posted By RolandofGilead:
10 miles a week? Is that what you meant? That's not enough really to drop a bunch of cash on expensive shoes....

I've become a fan of minimalist shoes like the Nike Free 3.0 and Puma H-Streets...goes against poplular belief, but I like them a lot. If you're running A LOT or really long distance it's probably not for you though.
I've used both of those types of shoes for runs up to 6 miles with no problem... (I'm NOT built like a runner either at about 5'9" 180)


I agree. The simpler the shoe the better imo. I've put up 50-70 mile weeks in shoes that weigh about 7 ounces. I can't run in normal trainers anymore, just doesn't feel right.
Link Posted: 9/8/2009 8:01:27 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/8/2009 8:02:29 AM EST by JonnyVain]
Originally Posted By foogoo:
I want to get back into running as I was a year ago (approx. 10mi/week, long distance and drills). Is it worth the extra money to get "real" running shoes i.e. Brooks? Or will I be alright sticking with Asics and the like?


VERY worth the money. Asics, New balance, etc. Stay away from Nike and Reebok. For something a bit more wild, look into FiveFingers. I plan on buying a pair, and reviews look good. Go to a running store and have a pro fit your foot. Doesn't matter what brand or how much $, if it isn't the right shoe for your foot.
Link Posted: 9/8/2009 12:22:20 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/9/2009 1:04:07 AM EST by Tomislav]
Go to a running shop and get fitted. If you supinate or pronate, your knees will thank you for 'correct' running shoes...
Link Posted: 9/8/2009 3:50:55 PM EST
I'm a flatfoot and I have had great luck with Avias my last several pairs.
Link Posted: 9/8/2009 3:55:26 PM EST
Originally Posted By Tomislav:
Go to a running shop and get fitted. If you supinate or pronate, you're knees will thank you for 'correct' running shoes...


Truer words could not be spoken.
Link Posted: 9/9/2009 12:51:17 AM EST
i am a New Balance guy

i got 993s - i need a stability shoe and these are doing the job - i run a good bit and they cured a bout of plantar faciitus i had last winter

i cant run in shoes that have that plastic splinting between the heel and forefoot because it doesnt flex enough and causes me foot problems

thats just me - shoes are a personal thing - but dont try to get by with real cheap shoes, i think a minimum of $80 -$100 - shoes are your foundation, so you dont want to get shoes on the cheap - it can make all the difference in a good running experience

everyone has told you what to do, go to a running store and try some on - figure out what works for you and stick with them

Link Posted: 9/9/2009 4:05:51 AM EST
Go into a "REAL" shoe store, one that caters to runners (runners world is a good example) and try on a whole bunch of shoes, alot of them will have a place that you can run to see how they feel on your feet. I tried a few that I didn't like!

That will help decide, I don't like recommending running shoes since everyone's feet are different and I just recently started getting into running myself
Link Posted: 9/11/2009 2:53:15 PM EST
I own a running specialty store. And the best thing to do which has been suggested is to go in get your stride/gait analyzed and then let them bring several shoes out for you. Go in with a blank mind and no expectations, if you have a price in mind bring it up. They should be able to find you something right for what you want to pay. Average right now is around $100 and you go up from there.

Next suggestion is dont let anyone suggest shoes for you, what works for them may not work for you ( most of the time it doesnt).
As for as brands go if its a "technical" running store everything on the wall should be legit. be it Nike, Asics, Brooks, Saucony, New Balance, Mizuno, etc. We wont put anything on your feet that we wont gaurantee.

Next make sure you take the shoes out and test em on the sidewalk, street, treadmill whatever they let you do. 1 quick 5 minute run isnt going to do anything than put a little dust on the bottom of the shoe, just please watch where you step had a lady step in dog sh!@ the other morning, lucky thing is she like those shoes the best. Dont let them BS you into inserts or orthotics either, We do a ton of orthotics and inserts, but these are injury rehab methods, the shoe they suggest should have the complete amount of support you need.
Also dont worry about LOOK, the color of the shoes wont matter after a couple runs and they are dirty.

Finally for blister prevention SOCKS, get a synthetic blend or 100% synthetic sock. right now Balega socks are killing everything else.
If you have any questions IM or email.
Link Posted: 9/11/2009 11:50:27 PM EST
Originally Posted By gehrkek:
I

Finally for blister prevention SOCKS, get a synthetic blend or 100% synthetic sock. right now Balega socks are killing everything else.
If you have any questions IM or email.


Agree 100% with the synthetic socks, though I am a huge Wrightsock fan, running and riding.

Link Posted: 9/12/2009 5:39:02 AM EST
Originally Posted By NickNolan:
http://www.runnersworld.com/video/1,8052,s6-4-0-4,00.html?bcpid=2891005001&bclid=1716449631&bctid=16474217001


+1

Asics are real running shoes. I prefer Brooks. Go to a running store and have them analyze your gait (you'll need to run on the treadmill they have for a minute or two.) They should be able to recommend 3 or 4 pairs that will work for you. Then you get to see which ones fit your foot the best and feel like something you want to run in.

Prepare to spend about $100 to maybe $140, depending on what the running store recommends.

10 miles a week is plenty enough to need good running shoes.

Get synthetic socks. They cost about $10 a pair. I like Balega Hidden Comfort.

Link Posted: 9/12/2009 9:03:53 PM EST
Originally Posted By macro:
Originally Posted By Tomislav:
Go to a running shop and get fitted. If you supinate or pronate, you're knees will thank you for 'correct' running shoes...


Truer words could not be spoken.


This. And go to a store that has a treadmill so you can actually try running in the new shoes. Also go 1 1/2-2 sizes up especially if you are going to run any distances at all or run in the heat ... it doesn't take much for your feet to swell pretty significantly.
Link Posted: 9/13/2009 9:55:32 AM EST
Originally Posted By meep:
Originally Posted By macro:
Originally Posted By Tomislav:
Go to a running shop and get fitted. If you supinate or pronate, you're knees will thank you for 'correct' running shoes...


Truer words could not be spoken.


This. And go to a store that has a treadmill so you can actually try running in the new shoes. Also go 1 1/2-2 sizes up especially if you are going to run any distances at all or run in the heat ... it doesn't take much for your feet to swell pretty significantly.



Going that much isnt always the best idea, a thumbs width from the end of the shoe is plenty of length in ANY weather. but the issue is the width of the shoe, if you are making up for the lack of space with length you will end up with issues. Get fitted for the correct width and size and you will be fine.

Link Posted: 9/13/2009 5:51:25 PM EST
I didn't read any of the other posts, but you need to go to a running shoe store. The brand dosen't matter as much as the fit, feel and support. They will check your stride and pronation. For example, I need a lot of support becuase I over pronate. I used to get shoes without enough support but now I have the proper shoes and my feet ankles kness and hips feel fine when I run. Before my new balance shoes I had Nike shoes which caused a lot of problems.
Link Posted: 9/13/2009 9:21:58 PM EST
Originally Posted By gehrkek:
Originally Posted By meep:
Originally Posted By macro:
Originally Posted By Tomislav:
Go to a running shop and get fitted. If you supinate or pronate, you're knees will thank you for 'correct' running shoes...


Truer words could not be spoken.


This. And go to a store that has a treadmill so you can actually try running in the new shoes. Also go 1 1/2-2 sizes up especially if you are going to run any distances at all or run in the heat ... it doesn't take much for your feet to swell pretty significantly.



Going that much isnt always the best idea, a thumbs width from the end of the shoe is plenty of length in ANY weather. but the issue is the width of the shoe, if you are making up for the lack of space with length you will end up with issues. Get fitted for the correct width and size and you will be fine.



I go up by that much, and it works for me ... maybe because I have bunions, maybe I am just prone to swelling. So ... YMMV. Talk to the pros at the store, though, they will generally steer you in the right direction.
Link Posted: 9/13/2009 11:01:14 PM EST
Ive been using the Nike 5.0 running shoes with no socks... I like them so far.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:46:29 PM EST
I like Brooks the best. Other shoes just don't seem to be thought out as well.. cause blisters, etc.. If you stick with it, they're worth it.

Link Posted: 9/20/2009 5:39:46 PM EST
I got fitted at a local running shop and am an overpronator. They recommended the Saucony Omni 8's. I have to admit, they are the most comfortable running shoes I've ever worn. They won't be so nice and pretty white for very long

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