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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/22/2005 7:24:34 PM EDT
So which is the better wood for an AK stock? Which is stronger? More likely to handle abuse or not break if dropped? Less likely to warp etc...
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 7:27:55 PM EDT
Laminate.

the wood grains are opposed, and the glue is generally pretty tough, too.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 7:31:28 PM EDT
A laminate if made worth a damn will always be stronger and less likely to break or warp.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 7:47:09 PM EDT
looking at stocks from ironwood... just tossing the idea around... but have no clue how to sand and finish wood. is it tough? any advice?
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 7:47:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Max_Mike:
A laminate if made worth a damn will always be stronger and less likely to break or warp.



Plus laminates just look so darn cute
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 7:47:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By piccolo:
Laminate.

the wood grains are opposed, and the glue is generally pretty tough, too.




what glue? please explain?
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 7:52:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JBravo223:

Originally Posted By piccolo:
Laminate.

the wood grains are opposed, and the glue is generally pretty tough, too.




what glue? please explain?



Laminate is thin slices of wood glued together, then cured. It was explained in a GunsN Ammo long ago, but I can't remember the whole prcoess.

Laminate is especially good for wet or moist conditions because the wood won't warp. It cannot absorb water. The foreign compounds and the slices of wood pressed very tightly together sqish the cells and make the stock much denser and stronger.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:30:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/22/2005 8:32:27 PM EDT by Cope]
I just installed an Ironwood laminated stock set last night. I wanted it to look rough, so I ordered a complete set from the woodpile for $60 shipped. Although I had to do some minor butchering on it (namely the butt plate recess, and the rear of the lower forearm), it was a piece of cake to finish. Just follow the instructions on their site. I am well pleased.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:36:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vanilla_gorilla:

Originally Posted By JBravo223:

Originally Posted By piccolo:
Laminate.

the wood grains are opposed, and the glue is generally pretty tough, too.




what glue? please explain?



Laminate is thin slices of wood glued together, then cured. It was explained in a GunsN Ammo long ago, but I can't remember the whole prcoess.

Laminate is especially good for wet or moist conditions because the wood won't warp. It cannot absorb water. The foreign compounds and the slices of wood pressed very tightly together sqish the cells and make the stock much denser and stronger.



It is honking big piece of plywood... Stronger and more stable than plain wood.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:40:46 PM EDT
I don't know about a gun stock, but laminate runners on a dogsled will way out last
solid wood of any type.


GM
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:45:40 PM EDT
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHHAAH

You got to be kidding me?

This is a joke topic right?
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:53:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/22/2005 8:54:59 PM EDT by NH_AR_Shooter]

Originally Posted By vanilla_gorilla:

Originally Posted By JBravo223:

Originally Posted By piccolo:
Laminate.

the wood grains are opposed, and the glue is generally pretty tough, too.




what glue? please explain?



Laminate is thin slices of wood glued together, then cured. It was explained in a GunsN Ammo long ago, but I can't remember the whole prcoess.

Laminate is especially good for wet or moist conditions because the wood won't warp. It cannot absorb water. The foreign compounds and the slices of wood pressed very tightly together sqish the cells and make the stock much denser and stronger.



Plywood has been my life lately.....

Now a days, plywood wood intended for firearms or boat hulls, most often use a two part epoxy rather than conventional glue. Seal the finished piece with a poly sealer and you have a pretty tough piece of wood.

I've made a few stocks and AK grips out of home made plywood, I cut out the pattern on 1/8th or 1/4 birch stock, apply epoxy, clamp and leave it for 24hr's. The different layers alternate direction and by precutting them I reduce the amount of carving, inletting etc.

What I want to do next is get some thin walnut sheets and make walnut plywood, I think that would look pretty cool with a nice oiled finish.



Link Posted: 9/22/2005 9:10:34 PM EDT
+1 for laminate. Especially for the warp resistance.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 9:25:35 PM EDT


Originally Posted By killingmachine123:
+1 for laminate. Especially for the warp resistance.



+1
IIRC....
If you take 2 thin slices of wood, and glue them together you have a peice of lamated wood that has the strength of 3 slices of wood..

If you take 10 thin slices of wood and laminate each one to the next, you have a peice of laminated wood that has the strength of 19 slices of wood.

The layers of glue act as another sheet of wood. Ever time you ad another peice of wood you get 2x the strength.
CH
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 9:41:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/22/2005 9:45:04 PM EDT by DienBienPhu54]
+1 for laminated wood

laminated wooden boat paddles hold up better than solid wood, laminated wooden baseball bats are tough and have more density that solid wood

more resistant to humidity, wont expand and effect accuracy from hot & humid conditions

rot resistant

looks nice
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 5:01:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/23/2005 5:02:43 AM EDT by JBravo223]

Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHHAAH

You got to be kidding me?

This is a joke topic right?



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