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Posted: 1/4/2012 10:19:53 AM EDT
With a business degree.

Flipping burgers?
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:20:26 AM EDT
Male Nanny.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:20:37 AM EDT
Whatever pays the bills- wheather its relavent to your degree or not.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:21:57 AM EDT
well.......shouldnt people who go to college and graduate with a degree even if its in underwater basket weaving make $30+ bucks an hour?
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:22:23 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:23:49 AM EDT
Considering 55 percent of all people ages 16 to 29 aren't employed - anything.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:24:54 AM EDT
DING!

Fries are done!
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:25:06 AM EDT
Army OCS
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:25:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 10:26:04 AM EDT by stevejg1]
Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
That's generally a question to ask BEFORE deciding on what degree to get, not after.


Four years ago I, as well as many others, believed that having a degree would significantly help our chances of getting employed.

We were being naive no doubt.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:27:03 AM EDT
Business degree?

Working crappy hours in retail for maybe $10/hr.?
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:27:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 10:27:29 AM EDT by DK-Prof]
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:27:55 AM EDT
Is this one of those "COLLIGE IZ DUMB!" threads? Or is it a "you should just kill yourself if you're not studying engineering!" thread?
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:29:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By M3A1:
Is this one of those "COLLIGE IZ DUMB!" threads? Or is it a "you should just kill yourself if you're not studying engineering!" thread?


Nah, neither. I'm not making excuses.

Perhaps this will turn into suggestions for a first job as that as that was my intention. However, it might not go as smoothly as one would think
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:29:46 AM EDT
indeed.com

monster.com

etc

Not that hard. Pick what you might want to do and search. Most sites will give you related jobs and you just might find something.

Also, even though you're graduated, never dismiss the possibility of an internship...you could start asking around.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:31:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Tahawus:
Considering 55 percent of all people ages 16 to 29 aren't employed - anything.


you cant be serious.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:32:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By stevejg1:
Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
That's generally a question to ask BEFORE deciding on what degree to get, not after.


Four years ago I, as well as many others, believed that having a degree would significantly help our chances of getting employed.

We were being naive no doubt.

Did you happen identify something more specific in "business" you were interested in during those 4 years?

Having the degree gets your application reviewed. Tailoring your education and training to that goal gives you the better chance (and also who you know.....)

Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:34:20 AM EDT
Get an internship somewhere. Try for finance or accounting positions.

Study for and take certification exams i.e CFA/CMA

Work temp jobs through business related agencies.

Once your resume is strong enough, swing for the big boys or talk to headhunters.



Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:35:06 AM EDT
You should be driving your ass to Pennsylvania, or North Dakota to run title for the oil and gas industry. Pay won't be great initially, but if you are smart and creative, you can make a mint once you know how the business works.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:36:41 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:39:49 AM EDT
My buddy has a business degree. He's 28 I think now.

Started right out of college working an IT help desk at some company. Got some more training and some network security education. Moved to being a network administrator, then eventually a network security auditor. Now he is a network security project manager of some sort making six figures at a government contractor.

Basically I'm saying take a decent job to get yourself in the door of a quality company, then work hard and move your way up the ladder. You might have to relocate to do this, depends what there is in your area.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:41:44 AM EDT
My income doubled after getting a degree. Three years later I was just shy of six figs. Programmer.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:42:36 AM EDT
TRGs fluffer?
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:43:52 AM EDT
Anything at this point.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:44:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
Originally Posted By 0612Devil:
Get an internship somewhere. Try for finance or accounting positions.

Study for and take certification exams i.e CFA/CMA

Work temp jobs through business related agencies.

Once your resume is strong enough, swing for the big boys or talk to headhunters.



This is good advice



It surely didn't do me any good. Not a good time for new people in the field.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:44:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 10:48:39 AM EDT by pokerdobe]
Business degree myself. 23 years old with an MPA, with CPA

Get certified in something. Finance or accounting is good if you haven't already graduated. Accounting with a CPA, I guarantee you'll almost never be out of work.

Maybe I'm an oddity, but the avg for my graduating class in my field was 55k starting. My peers from my grad class in other business fields avg like 40 (marketing)-60k(MIS).

ETA

Internships are key. If you haven't built up a solid resume by the time you grad, then you are SOL. Those who were doing it right had already signed on to a company by junior/senior year.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:46:21 AM EDT
Well, the internship you took your freshman, sophomore, and junior years should have led into a full time job.

But, if you were lazy and didn't do the work, you are shit out of luck.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:51:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Khemist:
Male Nanny.


Nannies in CT/NYC make $25/30 hr...of course it helps to be here less than legally and of course that means dodging taxes but they get paid much better than a hell of a lot of people.


Right now,ANY job is a good job. The building company I worked for the past 10 years went tits-up and I haven't had a paycheck since October.Right now,I have 3 undergrad degrees but no actual experience in anything close to my field of study. I have a couple friends with masters degrees in business and economics that are making ends meet banging nails and painting whatever they can get right now. The job market is all kinds of rough right now,if you can get your foot in the door with just about any decent company these days.go for it.

Hell,right now I have no plan at all as to what will happen when my savings run out in another 4-5 months
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:52:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 10:52:43 AM EDT by outofbattery]
Slide fire solutions keyboard.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:53:23 AM EDT
OWS spot filler?

Anything that pays (or helps pay) the bills... flipping burgers is better than sitting on your ass whining about not having a job.

Good luck in your search
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 12:34:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By _Soggy_:

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
Originally Posted By 0612Devil:
Get an internship somewhere. Try for finance or accounting positions.

Study for and take certification exams i.e CFA/CMA

Work temp jobs through business related agencies.

Once your resume is strong enough, swing for the big boys or talk to headhunters.



This is good advice



It surely didn't do me any good. Not a good time for new people in the field.


Situation dependent I suppose since location matters. If I had to move, I would.

I finished undergrad at the height of the recession and worked temp gigs at private equity/alternative investment firms for a year and got chartered with a finance related cert. Hooked my current employment shortly thereafter.

It certainly is tough out there, but not impossible. Employers railing about a "skills gap" should be a clue to anyone searching for work.


Link Posted: 1/4/2012 12:43:39 PM EDT
I graduated with a Business Degree in 2010. Decided I wasn't really cut out for that stuff. Got a job as a library manager two semesters prior to graduating so I am sticking with it. It's ok
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 12:55:06 PM EDT
Get the best job you can, be the best employee you can, and always keep your eyes open for something better.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 12:59:28 PM EDT
Anything.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:00:11 PM EDT
If you just graduated with a business degree - why not put some of that knowledge to actual work and study successful regional businesses and see which one are growing the fastest? Fast-growing firms need business people - right? Stagnant firms and markets don't. Examine market outlooks for the next 2-3 years.

Then pick up business journals for specific markets and see what is happening in them.


Homework. Homework.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:04:40 PM EDT
Anything with a paycheck that is legal.

Wish I wasn't joking. :/
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:10:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By stevejg1:
With a business degree.

Flipping burgers?


I would hope that degree made them smart enough to apply for a manager position.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:10:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 1:10:33 PM EDT by Seansworth]
Originally Posted By stevejg1:
With a business degree.

Flipping burgers?


Do you have a focus in a certain area or just a general business degree? It's been my understanding that a focus in accounting can really help the job search, a focus in marketing isn't bad, but that general business degrees with no focus don't help a whole lot without getting an MBA. Start submitting applications and resumes. Go to websites of companies that have offices anywhere around your area and find out how to apply. Even if they don't have any posted openings at the time still try to submit a resume. It could be a waste of time or you could get lucky and get an interview or two. One thing's for certain, you will not get an interview by not applying.

Don't be too proud to flip burgers until you find a better job. I just graduated with a degree in biology and I accepted a paid research position with one of my former professors for something to put on my resume while I look for a better job and try to decide whether I want to try for a graduate program. This position doesn't pay a whole lot so I'm trying to get hired for nights at the local Walmart. It'll pay the bills while allowing me to work on finding a better job and build the resume.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:11:37 PM EDT
Sales.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:12:26 PM EDT
Originally Posted By stevejg1:
With a business degree.

Flipping burgers?


A lot has to do with where you went to school and how well you did. Some places won't talk to anyone who didn't graduate from a business school with a good rep and a high GPA.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:23:11 PM EDT
Welcome to the real world.

My first job after I graduated I was a marketing manager for a food service provider. I made $20k/year with few holidays and no overtime pay.

I started really putting my resume out there, calling old contacts, while I finished up grad school. I eventually got a better job (and my post-grad degree hd nothing to do with it).
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:23:35 PM EDT
You don't have more of a plan?
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:33:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 1:34:54 PM EDT by cadetcameron]
Army officer (if you feel up to the task)

Make 50k a year, and a 12k raise after 2 years

Do your 4 years, get some experience for civilian jobs (hell, if you love it then stay)
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:36:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 1:38:56 PM EDT by Bustyrucket]
Find something that sounds interesting to you and dive right in! If you end up not liking it move on. Just remember, this is where the real learning experience begins

Liek cadetcameron suggested, you could always give the military a try. If you can't get into OCS out of the gate then you can do advanced enlistment and get in as an E4 after basic.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:39:43 PM EDT
"I cant find a job!"

Sure you can. There is no secret.
Start somewhere, anywhere that will hire you. Gain skills and knowledge to attain what you view is the next level. Work harder than your competition.
Get to the next level job/trade up
repeat.

"I don't have transportation"

If you don't have transportation, walk to work. Access to local jobs by foot
Save up money for a bike. acquire bike
ride bike to work (access to more jobs)
save up money for a car
ride car to work (access to even more jobs)
save up money for more reliable car
ride more reliable car to work (access to even more more jobs)
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:44:19 PM EDT
Anything not involving anal.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:45:49 PM EDT
Oil and Gas.
-Field work or Rig work.
-Landman, Title Agent Right of Way (ROW) Agent

Those would be where I would turn youngins to. I started at 24 y.o making $225 a day as a Landman (You pay all your own taxes and if you are lucky enough find a group that is paying expenses). There are landman out there making upto $600 per day, but that work is very short lived and you are constantly looking for a new place to work. Find a group that will give you constant work with less pay than hunting 6 months of the year for another job to get the experience in then once you know what the hell you are doing then you can demand higher pay.

Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:46:25 PM EDT
I had a job with a Fortune 100 company 6 months before I graduated with a 'Business' degree (Finance)

I had an awesome resume, good interview skills, and interned for the same company that summer.

Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:49:18 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Tahawus:
Considering 55 percent of all people ages 16 to 29 aren't employed - anything.


QFT. Anything that will pay the rent and the loans.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:51:35 PM EDT
Apply for a job at the DEA/FBI/ATFE/DIA/DHS/NSA/NRO.

Otherwise, I'd find a nice place to start out at the ground floor on. Learn a trade and then branch off into your own operation. It's what I did and it has been very worth my while.

Don't freak out about it too much. Take some time, smell the roses and think about things a little bit before you go balls deep into your Career.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:51:57 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
That's generally a question to ask BEFORE deciding on what degree to get, not after.


Amen
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:53:21 PM EDT
Not expecting detailed answers... just some thought questions:

What aspects of business are you interested in? ... Management? Accounting? Finance? Human resources? IT?

Do you think your goals in these areas will require a graduate degree?

What industries are you familiar with and interested in?

Hold any certifications? Interested in any certifications?

What are your future plans? Marriage? Family/friend business or other connections which might limit your mobility?

Did you get a "business degree" because you have something you want to do with it or was it just what seemed easiest at the time? if it is the latter, is it really what you want to do now?

Are you willing to work in a crappy industry to build an experiential resume?

Realistically, where would you like to be in 5 years? ... 10 years?



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