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Posted: 4/16/2006 5:07:16 PM EST
remove copper oxide? I am working on a laptop that the bottom plate got wet and the heat sink (Cu) is no longer working properly due to copper oxide. Also the Al cover is corroded as well (but I havent had Chem in so long I cant tell you what oxide that is) that also needs to be removed.

Amy suggestions?
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 5:07:55 PM EST
Vinager
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 5:11:32 PM EST
Used to clean pennies by putting them in vinegar and then adding salt. It creates a little hydrochloric acid. I don't know if this will help you in this case, but......
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 5:13:08 PM EST
warm (~110*F) 3% hydrogen peroxide (can be sped up with the addition of sulferic acid)
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 5:19:17 PM EST
Corrosion is never uniform. And the flatness of the heat transfer surfaces is hihgly dependent on the power than can bridge this junction. Thermal pastes work best when at minimum thickness, any deviation degrades heat transfer.

As such, it would be best to machine the surface pair to minimize the gap. You might get lucky by lapping the sufaces together with a very fine paste of ~1200 grit aluminum oxide, followed by a good cleaning and use of Artic Silver 5.

Link Posted: 4/16/2006 7:55:26 PM EST
Go over all of the boards with a fine toothed comb, there is likely to be damage all over the place, probably unrepairable.
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 7:56:38 PM EST
Tannerite.


And .50BMG
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 10:10:26 PM EST

Originally Posted By Will-Rogers:
Used to clean pennies by putting them in vinegar and then adding salt. It creates a little hydrochloric acid. I don't know if this will help you in this case, but......

I gotta lay off the pain killers . I thought that said penis's.
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 10:18:09 PM EST
CLR is some pretty potent stuff; I've used it to clean rust out of a sink before.

That is NOT lime-away, which does NOT work...
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