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Posted: 11/3/2009 7:42:30 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 7:55:10 AM EST by ChinoUSMC]


I've just realized that I haven't seen any fireflies this year, nor the year before that I can remember.

Several years ago, they used to cover the woods with its impressive light show near dusk.

This past summer (and with the heat in Oct, still feels like summer here in N. Tampa) I did not see one glow from any firefly.

Anybody else notice this or have a similar problem?

Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:43:56 AM EST
saw plenty of them this year in upstate NY
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:44:44 AM EST
I used to live in Illionis growing up and they lit up the backyard every night. I then moved to Michigan and now live in Texas. I haven't seen them since leaving Illionis in 2001.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:45:19 AM EST
Have not seen any in St Pete or Orlando.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:45:28 AM EST
We had a bunch this year in central VA. I had heard that they were slowly dying out, but you wouldn't have known it around here.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:46:04 AM EST
Saw a huge number in NOVA and PA.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:46:11 AM EST
Saw more bees, hummingbirds, fireflies, and bluejays around my area than I have in years.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:48:37 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 7:53:13 AM EST by ChinoUSMC]


Well, maybe it's just my area then. I live about 40mi north of Tampa and in the middle of nowhere. Used to be plentiful, but not a single firefly has lit off in my area.

Maybe they moved to a different location or died off.


Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:52:32 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 7:52:51 AM EST by hourglassing]
They have been hunted to near-extinction by the demands of the War on Terror for glowsticks.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:53:05 AM EST
I saw very few in KY this year. Unusual, since we're usually overrun with them.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:57:40 AM EST
It's the cell phones!!! Same as with the honey bees.

Seriously, I have been seeing them while in the woods this year. I even heard a whiporwill and a few bobwhite quail. Seems that there were a lot more when I was a kid.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 7:59:43 AM EST
Originally Posted By hourglassing:
They have been hunted to near-extinction by the demands of the War on Terror for glowsticks.


bwhahahaha


nice one




fwiw- they're like unicorns....figments of your imagination- try to catch one you'll see- next thing you know it's 20 feet further in front of you.... they don't really exist
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:06:03 AM EST
Their mating habits are badly disrupted by ambient light pollution near populated areas.

There are far far more 24 hour light sources now then there was even five years ago.

Something we will just have to deal with I suppose, fortunately we should see some rebound next year. Seeing as how thier main predator (Bats) just saw a 90+ percent of its population in the northeast die.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:14:07 AM EST
Lack of them in East Central FL also...
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:15:10 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:15:52 AM EST
Originally Posted By hourglassing:
They have been hunted to near-extinction by the demands of the War on Terror for glowsticks.


this and the fact we're dealing with Global Warming, which does account for killing off a considerable amount of their overall population, worldwide.....and Al Gore is not very happy about this! maybe we could buy firefly credits? like carbon credits?


Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:19:36 AM EST
Originally Posted By LoBrau:
We had a bunch this year in central VA. I had heard that they were slowly dying out, but you wouldn't have known it around here.


Yup, here in central VA, they were out in force. Some summer nights, I'd get home and they'd all be sync'd up and flying 2-3 feet off the ground. Pretty cool to watch, like a moving strobe carpet!
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:30:32 AM EST
Originally Posted By WGPKlaus:
Originally Posted By hourglassing:
They have been hunted to near-extinction by the demands of the War on Terror for glowsticks.


this and the fact we're dealing with Global Warming, which does account for killing off a considerable amount of their overall population, worldwide.....and Al Gore is not very happy about this! maybe we could buy firefly credits? like carbon credits?

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_hntojuBOgo0/SNri2nKC7uI/AAAAAAAADjc/mATx0KraOHM/s320/al-gore-fire.jpg


Source?
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:36:19 AM EST
More this year than the last 10 years combined here in PA. I guess the mild winter, and all the early rain we had allowed more of the grubs to mature.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:38:41 AM EST
Originally Posted By Maynard:

Originally Posted By Katana16j:
Something we will just have to deal with I suppose, fortunately we should see some rebound next year. Seeing as how thier main predator (Bats) just saw a 90+ percent of its population in the northeast die.

What was the cause of the bat deaths?


A relatively harmless fungus that gorws on thier muzzles. It doesn't actually hurt the bats and when they are active they easily wipe it off, however it makes it difficult for Bat's to breath while hibernating so they wake up in the middle of their hibernation. They burn too much of thier energy reserve to wake up a few times because of it and they can't last through the winter.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:38:47 AM EST
Originally Posted By BrianB2:
Originally Posted By WGPKlaus:
Originally Posted By hourglassing:
They have been hunted to near-extinction by the demands of the War on Terror for glowsticks.


this and the fact we're dealing with Global Warming, which does account for killing off a considerable amount of their overall population, worldwide.....and Al Gore is not very happy about this! maybe we could buy firefly credits? like carbon credits?

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_hntojuBOgo0/SNri2nKC7uI/AAAAAAAADjc/mATx0KraOHM/s320/al-gore-fire.jpg


Source?



Guess I neglected to use an emoticon, denoting the post being made in jest?
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:40:05 AM EST
Originally Posted By Katana16j:
Something we will just have to deal with I suppose, fortunately we should see some rebound next year. Seeing as how thier main predator (Bats) just saw a 90+ percent of its population in the northeast die.


I don't think bats eat many fireflies. Fireflies are beetles, and like most coleopterans (beetles), taste terrible, not to mention a difficult-to-eat armored shell (like popcorn shells, only worse).

Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:46:29 AM EST
Originally Posted By WGPKlaus:
Originally Posted By BrianB2:
Originally Posted By WGPKlaus:
Originally Posted By hourglassing:
They have been hunted to near-extinction by the demands of the War on Terror for glowsticks.


this and the fact we're dealing with Global Warming, which does account for killing off a considerable amount of their overall population, worldwide.....and Al Gore is not very happy about this! maybe we could buy firefly credits? like carbon credits?

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_hntojuBOgo0/SNri2nKC7uI/AAAAAAAADjc/mATx0KraOHM/s320/al-gore-fire.jpg


Source?


Thank you! I was hoping it was joking. Hate to see a fellow MD'er falling for the climate BS.


Guess I neglected to use an emoticon, denoting the post being made in jest?


Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:46:50 AM EST
Originally Posted By manowar669:
Originally Posted By Katana16j:
Something we will just have to deal with I suppose, fortunately we should see some rebound next year. Seeing as how thier main predator (Bats) just saw a 90+ percent of its population in the northeast die.


I don't think bats eat many fireflies. Fireflies are beetles, and like most coleopterans (beetles), taste terrible, not to mention a difficult-to-eat armored shell (like popcorn shells, only worse).



I thought beetles (some types) were good-eatin' in many parts of the world...
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:47:56 AM EST
This year was the first time I have ever seen them in Wyoming. I remember, growing up in the South, having the windshield glowing, at times, because they were so thick in places.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:48:31 AM EST
Had plenty here in north central TX

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:49:59 AM EST
Originally Posted By DriftPunch:
Originally Posted By manowar669:
Originally Posted By Katana16j:
Something we will just have to deal with I suppose, fortunately we should see some rebound next year. Seeing as how thier main predator (Bats) just saw a 90+ percent of its population in the northeast die.


I don't think bats eat many fireflies. Fireflies are beetles, and like most coleopterans (beetles), taste terrible, not to mention a difficult-to-eat armored shell (like popcorn shells, only worse).



I thought beetles (some types) were good-eatin' in many parts of the world...


I've seen them eat Japanese beatles (which are a tremendous pest here) and fireflies. I don't think they mind the taste when they're hungry.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:30:05 AM EST
Seen fireflys here like normal.

Definetly noticed a drop in the number or ladybugs though and thats a good thing. They used to be everywhere!!!
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:40:11 AM EST
saw em here in Michigan. Not as many as usual but saw plenty. Maybe something to do with our cool wet spring or maybe they run in a cycle like the locusts, LOL

J-
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