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Posted: 6/12/2009 12:46:45 PM EST
Tried a little experiment this morning, I salvaged a mason jar of gasoline out of my dad's old shed. (He used gas to clean guns and fishing reels) Lots of stuff in there without labels. The local Hazmat guys would freak.

The gas had turned brown and had sludge at the bottom. Did not smell like any gas I've ever encountered

My dad died in 1977 and this jar has been on the shelf since that time. The lid was too rusted to remove so I punched a hole in the lid, mixed it with 2-stroke oil and fed it to the weedeater thru a coffee filter.

Sucker fired right up and ran until the tank was dry. Got a little too much oil so it smoked rather badly, but trucked along nonetheless. Plenty of power to do the whole back of the house, fenceline, and then some. The weedeater seems fine.

It started me to thinking, Paint thinner? Lacquer thinner? WD-40? Cheap tequila? The wife's nasty dark roast coffee? As long as I use enough oil, what else will work?
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 12:49:15 PM EST
Someone on this forum did this a few years back with a 4 stroke lawn mower.

As I recall it ran on everything he threw at it.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 12:49:44 PM EST
Anything, I would be surprised is heavily caffenated piss wouldnt work.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 12:57:07 PM EST
anything but fresh fuel and good 2 stroke mix in that machine over time and it will catch up to you. paint thinner and booze dont have much lubricity and are very "dry". old fuel breaks down quickly and can cause fuel lines and carbs to gum up. you can mix it into fresh fuel in small quantities with little or no effect.

i used to get people bringing in motors with old fuel in the tank, fuel mixed too strong, and fuel mixed too light. all caused problems over time.

seriously you can try and run different things through the motor just dont do it through a new or nice motor. try it out on an old junker.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 1:10:08 PM EST
Lots of stuff will run a motor for a while. But most of it won't run it for long without serious damage.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 1:14:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/12/2009 1:15:08 PM EST by larkinmusic]
Straight gasoline won't run a two stroke leaf blower for very long before it seizes. Just ask my wife.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 1:20:04 PM EST


I drink so much moonshine, I just piss in my two strokes and add oil.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 1:24:36 PM EST
Any type of alcohol will work. But you must adjust the air/fuel mixture accordingly.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 5:00:13 PM EST
Originally Posted By mnd:
Someone on this forum did this a few years back with a 4 stroke lawn mower.

As I recall it ran on everything he threw at it.


That was PeteCO, IIRC.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 9:59:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/12/2009 10:09:04 PM EST by SacStock]
The key with a two stroke is keeping it lubricated. What it's burning doesn't matter nearly as much as the lubrication. Two strokes typically have pretty low compression, so you don't really have to worry about feeding it fuel that's too low in octane rating and causing destructive detonation. Just make sure you mix in enough oil. For newer oil-injected two strokes, I have no idea what works or doesn't work.

For four strokes, you can deal with the "lack of lubricity" issue with mystery fuels by adding a little Marvel's Mystery Oil (do they still make that stuff?). Somewhere around 1 ounce of Marvel's per gallon of fuel works pretty well. Just make sure you don't let this mix sit in cold weather for a long time; the Marvel's can drop out of suspension and foxtrot up your carb.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 10:09:10 PM EST
Kerosene and mothballs should work. The mothballs (napthalene) are powerful octane index enhancer. I ran my lawn tractor on it, about 16 ounces per gallon. It might have problems in cooler weather because of vaporization issues.

In a 2 stroke gas engine, vaporization of the fuel in the crankcase leaves behind a film of oil, lubricating the works. This is why engines should not be run hard until warm as fuel dilution reduces lubrication.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 10:20:38 PM EST
ive heard that you can run almost 100% oil if you gradually refill into a hot motor
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 2:20:08 AM EST
I've used thinner many a time.
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 4:43:10 AM EST
When I was 13 I had a Husqvarna 125 2-stroke dirt bike. I'd raid my dad's roto tiller, push mower...whatever for gas.

One day all I could get from scrounging was a quart of gas. I had one of the RC planes you use nitromethane fuel in. I poured that into the gasoline and mixed in my 2 stroke oil.


Holy shit batman....that Husqvarna's powerband kicked in much lower and had a shitload more power.

All my buddies are jumping this little hill in front of my grandmothers house with their 4 wheelers. I went to jump it with the bike and the bike jumped out from under me and went straight into the sky. As I was falling back to earth ass first and staring up into the air all I saw was this Husqvarna bike going straight up into the Maple Tree and when it came down it ran wide open spinning around in circles throwing grass all over the place.

Needless to say this 70+ year old lady came out yelling at me but everyone that was there was staring in awe.

That nitromethane shit ain't no joke. Works in 2 strokes when mixed with gasoline. Don't know if it will work straight up mixed with oil. I didn't have the balls to try it.
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 7:21:00 AM EST

Originally Posted By tothemax:
anything but fresh fuel and good 2 stroke mix in that machine over time and it will catch up to you. paint thinner and booze dont have much lubricity and are very "dry". old fuel breaks down quickly and can cause fuel lines and carbs to gum up. you can mix it into fresh fuel in small quantities with little or no effect.

i used to get people bringing in motors with old fuel in the tank, fuel mixed too strong, and fuel mixed too light. all caused problems over time.

seriously you can try and run different things through the motor just dont do it through a new or nice motor. try it out on an old junker.

This.

I've personally run paint thinner and kerosene and Coleman Fuel in my vehicles, but only on an emergency basis and most of the time I diluted it with new gas.

We went on a camping trip to northern CA a couple of years ago and my van ran out of gas just outside of Winnemucca. I put in a gallon of Coleman Fuel and was able to make it to a gas station. But I wouldn't do that again unless I needed to.
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 8:04:19 AM EST
Originally Posted By SacStock:
The key with a two stroke is keeping it lubricated. What it's burning doesn't matter nearly as much as the lubrication. Two strokes typically have pretty low compression, so you don't really have to worry about feeding it fuel that's too low in octane rating and causing destructive detonation. Just make sure you mix in enough oil. For newer oil-injected two strokes, I have no idea what works or doesn't work.

For four strokes, you can deal with the "lack of lubricity" issue with mystery fuels by adding a little Marvel's Mystery Oil (do they still make that stuff?). Somewhere around 1 ounce of Marvel's per gallon of fuel works pretty well. Just make sure you don't let this mix sit in cold weather for a long time; the Marvel's can drop out of suspension and foxtrot up your carb.



Not sure what 2 strokes this post is talking about, but a boat motor such as my mercury 200 runs 110-120 lbs of compression and low octane will blow a motor like this up in a heartbeat! Don't experiment with fuels in boat motors!
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 9:04:52 AM EST
Originally Posted By mnd:
Someone on this forum did this a few years back with a 4 stroke lawn mower.

As I recall it ran on everything he threw at it.


I'd be careful with doing that to a 4-stroke as the "fuel" may dilute and break down the oil in the case. With a 2 stroke you have to worry about the oil ratios getting fucked up because the jets have to be sized for the fuel. You may have enough of an aperature in the high speed carb jet to make it run and get good power, but the oil content of the fuel being burned may not be right and you WILL end up trashing the motor eventually.
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 9:06:58 AM EST
Originally Posted By morningwood1429:
ive heard that you can run almost 100% oil if you gradually refill into a hot motor


Military duece and a halfs will run on straight oil.
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 9:07:58 AM EST
Originally Posted By cckw:
Originally Posted By SacStock:
The key with a two stroke is keeping it lubricated. What it's burning doesn't matter nearly as much as the lubrication. Two strokes typically have pretty low compression, so you don't really have to worry about feeding it fuel that's too low in octane rating and causing destructive detonation. Just make sure you mix in enough oil. For newer oil-injected two strokes, I have no idea what works or doesn't work.

For four strokes, you can deal with the "lack of lubricity" issue with mystery fuels by adding a little Marvel's Mystery Oil (do they still make that stuff?). Somewhere around 1 ounce of Marvel's per gallon of fuel works pretty well. Just make sure you don't let this mix sit in cold weather for a long time; the Marvel's can drop out of suspension and foxtrot up your carb.



Not sure what 2 strokes this post is talking about, but a boat motor such as my mercury 200 runs 110-120 lbs of compression and low octane will blow a motor like this up in a heartbeat! Don't experiment with fuels in boat motors!


2 strokes really do run a low compression RATIO on average than their 4 stroke counterparts. They don't need high octane gas either.
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 9:13:17 AM EST
Well, I run a quart of two stroke oil in my Cummins since the new ultra low sulfur diesel fuel has come out. Makes the engine run smoother and quieter. So maybe you could mix some diesel in with your two stroke oil...let me how that goes.
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 2:35:04 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/13/2009 2:46:02 PM EST by A_Free_Man]
Coleman fuel is a low grade gasoline and runs just fine in small engines. Less octane is needed because there is so much less room for detonation (knocking) to occur. I think Coleman is something like 60-70 octane.

You can run Ethanol (grain alcohol) with oil, but regular 2-stroke oils don't mix with alcohol like they do with gasoline. You would have to use castor oil or certain synthetics like they use with model airplane ("glow fuel"). Whereas gas runs in a 12:1 air to fuel ratio (by weight), ethanol runs 9:1. This means you would have to richen the mixture by about a third.

You can run Methanol (wood alcohol) with oil, see my notes above about ethanol. But Methanol runs in a 6:1 air to fuel ratio. You would need to richen the mixture still more, passing twice as much fuel as with gasoline. The jets and fuel passages in the carburetor may or may not allow the mixture to be richened this far. This would also be the same as model glow fuel known as "FAI Fuel". This is glow engine fuel that has only alky as the base, no nitromethane. In many foreign countries any nitro type chemicals are classified as explosives and illegal to possess.

Model airplane "glow fuel" with various percentages of nitromethane as an ignition enhancer. As you "tip the can" (increase nitromethane content) the fuel mixture must be further richened dramatically. Nitromethane burns at a 1.5:1 air fuel mixture. If compression (or blower/turbo boost) is high enough nitro is a "monopropellant", meaning it needs no outside air source to burn (like gunpowder, for example).

Very small engines, such as the well known Cox .049's run more consistently with addition of nitro, 15-25%, sometimes up to 40%, particularly in cold weather. It is difficult to start .049's, especially in cold weather, with FAI fuel (no nitro). Larger glow engines benefit less from nitro, but still gain better idling and power from nitro.

These model airplane glow fuels will run in a weedeater engine, but as stated, need to have the mixture right, and that is not always possible with stock carbs. Also, nitro may damage some seals. (Aside - some have adapted model airplane engine carbs, such as the Perry carb, to small gas engines in order to run alky based fuels.)

You might be able to get a weedeater engine to run on kerosene/oil mix if you add a little gas to it. This will run very close to the mixture setting for gasoline. Ditto "lighter fluid"... must have some lubricating oil added, just as with gas.

Link Posted: 6/13/2009 3:51:17 PM EST
Originally Posted By TheOtherDave:
Originally Posted By cckw:
Originally Posted By SacStock:
The key with a two stroke is keeping it lubricated. What it's burning doesn't matter nearly as much as the lubrication. Two strokes typically have pretty low compression, so you don't really have to worry about feeding it fuel that's too low in octane rating and causing destructive detonation. Just make sure you mix in enough oil. For newer oil-injected two strokes, I have no idea what works or doesn't work.

For four strokes, you can deal with the "lack of lubricity" issue with mystery fuels by adding a little Marvel's Mystery Oil (do they still make that stuff?). Somewhere around 1 ounce of Marvel's per gallon of fuel works pretty well. Just make sure you don't let this mix sit in cold weather for a long time; the Marvel's can drop out of suspension and foxtrot up your carb.



Not sure what 2 strokes this post is talking about, but a boat motor such as my mercury 200 runs 110-120 lbs of compression and low octane will blow a motor like this up in a heartbeat! Don't experiment with fuels in boat motors!


2 strokes really do run a low compression RATIO on average than their 4 stroke counterparts. They don't need high octane gas either.


What 4 stroke are you comparing it to? Outdoor power equipment in general (2 and 4 stroke cycle) run fairly low compression ratios.

However 6.5:1+ two stroke cycle high rpm air cooled engine is creating a lot of heat that requires mid grade or premium fuel to resist detonation. Check out the ops manuals of the major high quality two-stroke cycle OPE engines, Echo, Stihl, Husky... they all require mid or premium fuel.
Link Posted: 6/14/2009 9:03:24 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/14/2009 9:03:43 PM EST by cckw]
Originally Posted By PARover:
Originally Posted By TheOtherDave:
Originally Posted By cckw:
Originally Posted By SacStock:
The key with a two stroke is keeping it lubricated. What it's burning doesn't matter nearly as much as the lubrication. Two strokes typically have pretty low compression, so you don't really have to worry about feeding it fuel that's too low in octane rating and causing destructive detonation. Just make sure you mix in enough oil. For newer oil-injected two strokes, I have no idea what works or doesn't work.

For four strokes, you can deal with the "lack of lubricity" issue with mystery fuels by adding a little Marvel's Mystery Oil (do they still make that stuff?). Somewhere around 1 ounce of Marvel's per gallon of fuel works pretty well. Just make sure you don't let this mix sit in cold weather for a long time; the Marvel's can drop out of suspension and foxtrot up your carb.



Not sure what 2 strokes this post is talking about, but a boat motor such as my mercury 200 runs 110-120 lbs of compression and low octane will blow a motor like this up in a heartbeat! Don't experiment with fuels in boat motors!


2 strokes really do run a low compression RATIO on average than their 4 stroke counterparts. They don't need high octane gas either.


What 4 stroke are you comparing it to? Outdoor power equipment in general (2 and 4 stroke cycle) run fairly low compression ratios.

However 6.5:1+ two stroke cycle high rpm air cooled engine is creating a lot of heat that requires mid grade or premium fuel to resist detonation. Check out the ops manuals of the major high quality two-stroke cycle OPE engines, Echo, Stihl, Husky... they all require mid or premium fuel.



Yes, read the manual! The first clue of low octane problems is a blown motor... at least with a V-4 or larger outboard.

Oh, hell go try all this shit and report back
Link Posted: 6/14/2009 9:20:27 PM EST
Originally Posted By mnd:
Someone on this forum did this a few years back with a 4 stroke lawn mower.

As I recall it ran on everything he threw at it.


That thread was awesome.
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