Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 1/2/2006 4:47:35 AM EDT
There's an old mica mine near my parent's house and we used camp and explore there. It's from about WWll era.
Any ideas what they used the mica for?
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 4:51:07 AM EDT
insulator, used in (some) capacitors...

Link Posted: 1/2/2006 4:52:53 AM EDT
Formica of coarse

Seriously, I think it was used in electronic insulation.
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 4:55:35 AM EDT
Used to find it in old toasters. I guess it was used as an insulator/reflector.

When I was a kid we used to see who could peel it apart and come up with the thinnest largest piece.
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 4:57:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Merrell:
insulator, used in (some) capacitors...





Yup...

Powdered mica is sometimes used as a case neck lubricant when resizing rifle brass.
You can buy the stuff through Midway, Midsouth, or Brownell's...
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 4:58:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/2/2006 4:58:43 AM EDT by mikejohnson]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mica


(I won't make it hot - you could have just looked it up.)
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 5:17:34 AM EDT
well, my brother owns a really pretty, well made, antique woodstove. we live in texas, so it's still in his garage, but it's got little windows in the door to check the fire. they're "glassed" in mica.
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 5:24:00 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 5:33:54 AM EDT
Heat and electrical insulators and lubricant.

Mica has the highest dielectric constant of all natural materials. I don't know about its thermal conductivity.
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 5:37:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/2/2006 5:38:20 AM EDT by cmjohnson]
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 5:39:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/2/2006 5:40:22 AM EDT by Hexagonal]
Mica disks were used in the sound reproducers in old Victrolas, as the diaphragm that the needle vibrated to send the sound up the tonearm.
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 6:59:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mikejohnson:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mica


(I won't make it hot - you could have just looked it up.)



I could have but this place is more fun than Wikipedia, and we have some pretty smart guys here.
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 7:08:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By captainpooby:

Originally Posted By mikejohnson:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mica


(I won't make it hot - you could have just looked it up.)



I could have but this place is more fun and more accurate than Wikipedia, and we have some pretty smart guys here.

Link Posted: 1/2/2006 7:17:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pdxshooter:

Originally Posted By captainpooby:

Originally Posted By mikejohnson:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mica


(I won't make it hot - you could have just looked it up.)



I could have but this place is more fun and more accurate than Wikipedia, and we have some pretty smart guys here.





Nine guys in this thread spoke from personal knowledge and had the answers. Pretty impressive.
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 7:21:20 PM EDT
IIRC mica was also used for lantern globes and back in the day in places when glass was hard to find it made a good enough window to allow some light in during the day.
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 7:27:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pdxshooter:

Originally Posted By captainpooby:

Originally Posted By mikejohnson:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mica


(I won't make it hot - you could have just looked it up.)



I could have but this place is more fun and more accurate than Wikipedia, and we have some pretty smart guys here.




but wiki is not the only site....google works...thats how i found the wiki site...and there are a hell of a lot more than 9 sites returned in a search
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 7:30:04 PM EDT
http://www.icrmica.com

http://www.icrmica.com/icrmica_mica_introduction.html
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 7:32:12 PM EDT
mica is cool shist!!!!
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 7:33:37 PM EDT
interesting: a table listing the purposes of different forms of mica

www.icrmica.com/icrmica_micapowder_flakes.html
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 7:35:29 PM EDT
Man, mica seems to be pretty useful - like the world would notice if it were gone...
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 7:36:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 7:48:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mikejohnson:
http://www.icrmica.com

http://www.icrmica.com/icrmica_mica_introduction.html




You sir, are a total killjoy.

I prefer to come here and ask my friends, sorta like a conversation. I know how Google works, I even have a post on Wiki Diki, la dee doo!

That is boring and I dont get to see who, in my group of friends, posesses the knowledge I seek.
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 8:06:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By desertmoon:
mica is cool shist!!!!





SRM
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 10:16:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By captainpooby:

Originally Posted By mikejohnson:
http://www.icrmica.com

http://www.icrmica.com/icrmica_mica_introduction.html




You sir, are a total killjoy.

I prefer to come here and ask my friends, sorta like a conversation. I know how Google works, I even have a post on Wiki Diki, la dee doo!

That is boring and I dont get to see who, in my group of friends, posesses the knowledge I seek.



Cause you HAVE friends here, bud They pretty much won't piss in your cheerios.


It's much more fun to pick brains here



Link Posted: 1/2/2006 10:39:05 PM EDT
I was always finding and collecting little chunks of mica as a kid. Now I can't find any to save my life, even what I already collected.
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 10:58:13 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 9:36:35 AM EDT
He was the sheriff on "The Rifleman".
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 10:56:13 AM EDT
Early televisions used mica. Early like around the 1920's
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 11:32:00 AM EDT
Isinglass is another name for mica, for all you cross word puzzlers.
Top Top