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Posted: 8/21/2017 1:10:36 PM EST
Have a project which I need to make sure things are straight, in the middle of a structure, from one end to the other. I don't trust the walls enough to measure off of them for a standard chalk-line.

Lowes has one made by 'Skil' for $50. I'm not too crazy about the Skil brand, though. I bought a box of 'el cheapo' router bits at Harbor Freight, recently, and saw the exact same product badged as 'Skil' that same day. Granted, that is just one item but it does make me question their overall quality.

If you have a laser chalkline, what brand? ...and how is it working out for you?

P.s. - I don't want to buy one of those $200 DeWalt deals
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 1:13:04 PM EST
I use a Hilti something or other.  
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 1:15:56 PM EST
You could probably rent one.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 1:57:58 PM EST
Bought a Bosch GLL2-80 last year when purchasing a home that had many projects built in. So far it has been a absolute pleasure to work with for the following projects:

Jacking the house to replace the undersized main beam with a steel H beam, support column, footings and sistering floor joists. Indispensable to throw a horizontal laser line and measure the amount the jacks where moving the ceiling/floor, setting the base of the beam pockets in the foundation wall, setting the new main beams (3 separate beam segments w/2 support columns), measuring floor sag for setting load bearing walls etc..

Redoing the kitchen: floor height measurements for self leveling concrete, chalk/laser line reference for truing walls, leveling cabinets, striking lines for can light installation etc..).

I have moved onto replacing the front yard dilapidated railroad tie retaining wall with a block retaining wall. The base block is most critical as it sets the position of all blocks on top of it. I started using a bubble level, torpedo for individual blocks and 4' bubble for seeing how the wall is trending. That idea was soon punted for the GLL2-80. Just have to measure from the top of a reference block to the laser for the arbitrary number and ensure all four corners of your next blocks are the same number. Much quicker and precise than working with a bubble level. Just have to pray for a cloudy day as using it in the bright sun is a PINA; been doing a lot of the work after work into the night time with a head lamp and its great to work with in the dusk/dark.

Replacing the front entrance deck follows and I know it would will play well there too.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 2:12:35 PM EST
I have a Bosch, about $150. I thought it was a one time use tool, but I have used the crap out of this thing. I got a tripod for like $30 on Amazon, you will want that too. And the red laser glasses help out a lot when the line is barely visible when using it outside in sunlight. As a guy a bit beyond the average DIYer ( I built my whole house myself) I find it indispensable now. Especially when building decks on the side of a mountain and whatnot.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 2:48:42 PM EST
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Originally Posted By bco175:
And the red laser glasses help out a lot when the line is barely visible when using it outside in sunlight.
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Thanks for the tip.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 2:56:49 PM EST
We have a couple versions of Bosch. Pretty bombproof, so far.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 4:17:16 PM EST
If you want to splurge a little, I can recommend the Johnson Tool Cross Line Laser Level.

It's self-leveling, which makes it quick to use, particularly if you have to move it from one spot to another - Just turn it on, and the cross lines settle to a perfect level within just a second or two.

I'm currently using mine to hang a drop ceiling, and it's pleasure to use.
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 12:02:08 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Skibane:
If you want to splurge a little, I can recommend the Johnson Tool Cross Line Laser Level.

It's self-leveling, which makes it quick to use, particularly if you have to move it from one spot to another - Just turn it on, and the cross lines settle to a perfect level within just a second or two.

I'm currently using mine to hang a drop ceiling, and it's pleasure to use.
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That is a pretty sweet deal - thanks!
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 12:08:10 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Skibane:
If you want to splurge a little, I can recommend the Johnson Tool Cross Line Laser Level.

It's self-leveling, which makes it quick to use, particularly if you have to move it from one spot to another - Just turn it on, and the cross lines settle to a perfect level within just a second or two.

I'm currently using mine to hang a drop ceiling, and it's pleasure to use.
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The "self levels to within + or - 6 degrees was a bit of a turnoff......

Have you tested it for accuracy?
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 1:07:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/22/2017 1:10:02 AM EST by Skibane]
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Originally Posted By Marksman14:


The "self levels to within + or - 6 degrees was a bit of a turnoff......

Have you tested it for accuracy?
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Yeh, the way that spec is worded is a little misleading.

What they mean is that as long as the tripod is sitting on a surface that is within +/- 6 degrees of being level with the earth's surface, the laser leveling mechanism is capable of pivoting enough to point the laser in a direction that puts it parallel with the earth's surface (which is hopefully also parallel with the surface that it's actually sitting on).

Basically, the laser emitter floats on a pendulum - Same basic principle as a plumb. However, this pendulum only has the ability to pivot +/- 6 degrees.

I have tested it against my 4' spirit level at 40 feet, and can't see any error at all.
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