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Posted: 6/17/2009 7:59:45 AM EST
No, not that. Dangerous Places by Robert Young Pelton

Dangerous Places

I used to read his stories on the web back in the 90's, and then one day his site was just gone. I think that was the day he released version 1. I'll add some quotes later, he is a great writer. Now and again you see him on Fox and even CNN. This guy has been all over the world. If you are into adventure stories, get this book. The damn thing is about 4 inches thick but it reads fast.

Rob

Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:02:02 AM EST
Currently reading "Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern Warfare' by Mark Bowden
up next is "Lone Survivor" by Marcus Luttrell
after that "Last of the Mohicans" by James Fenimore Cooper
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:03:17 AM EST
"Big Russ and Me" by Tim Russert.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:04:08 AM EST
The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand.
Next up is We The Living
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:07:48 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/17/2009 8:08:40 AM EST by prone]
Right now I'm reading Lone Survivor, I've heard so many here sing it praises, it's a damn good read.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:12:08 AM EST
I am reading Quantum: Einstein, Bohr and the Great Debate About the Nature of Reality by Manjit Kumar. I also read a book by Robert Young Pelton about private military contractors. I thought it was a good read.




Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:15:25 AM EST
Originally Posted By JoseCuervo:
No, not that. Dangerous Places by Robert Young Pelton

Dangerous Places

I used to read his stories on the web back in the 90's, and then one day his site was just gone. I think that was the day he released version 1. I'll add some quotes later, he is a great writer. Now and again you see him on Fox and even CNN. This guy has been all over the world. If you are into adventure stories, get this book. The damn thing is about 4 inches thick but it reads fast.

Rob



I liked reading his articles in National Geographic Adventure. I'll have to pick that up.

I've been reading one of the H.P. Lovecraft collections for the last three months. Haven't had the time or patience to open up a book since then.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:20:31 AM EST
Pelton is the author of "License To Kill" about the private military contractor business. Good read.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:21:41 AM EST
green eggs and ham.. Dr Suess

Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:35:03 AM EST
Guards, Guards, Guards.

Going back through the Discworld since I found out Terry Pratchett has early onset Alzheimer's.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:35:13 AM EST
Just finished "Kildar" by John Ringo. Next is the next in the series. Choosers of the Slain. Kildar was awesome military male cheuvanist fiction. I enjoyed every page.

Ringo was a military man so the technical details are pretty much there, too. I hate fake crap. You have to stretch your imagination for the situations, though. They call it fiction for a reason.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 10:00:14 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/17/2009 10:05:09 AM EST by JoseCuervo]
The Minibus

So the minibus may look like the one your neighbor drives with Slurpee stains and soccer cleat marks in the carpet, but in Pakistan it's typically uglier, older, loaded with people, going 60 miles per hour and weaving through donkeys, cow poop, and trucks. And while we are painting a mental picture here, imagine the driver stoned on hash, the windows covered with stickers, the tires having cords showing through, the brakes having worn out last year, and an identical mechanism of death heading at a higher rate of speed directly toward you.

So when Achmed turns to wave at Abdul, the kabob vendor, he doesn't quite catch Wali heading at a combined 120 miles an hour toward him. Now, at this point, skill, luck, and religion have deserted you. Only the laws of physics and anatomy are in charge. As the two buses collide, your body decelerates from 60 miles an hour to zero in 2 milliseconds. Although the buses may have stopeed, Newtonian physics compel you through the non-safety plateglass window out into the bustling traffic, and into the crowd of the gawking bystanders who quickly surround your battered, bleeding body to scoop up your wallet and valuables. Not a pretty story. Having been at the site of many bus crashes in my travels, I can best compare the scene to putting a dozen mice in a coffee can along with glass and nails, slamming it against a wall, and then shaking it for a few minutes more. Then spray the bloody contents across the path of oncomming traffic.

...I'm sure you will never imagine yourself on one of these rickety, belching conveyances, but the first time you need to get from point A to B in countries where gum and deodorant are considered luxury items, you will indeed find yourself on one.


The Worlds Most Dangerous Places , Robert Young Pelton, Collins 2005

Link Posted: 6/17/2009 11:37:56 AM EST

Originally Posted By JoseCuervo:
The Minibus

So the minibus may look like the one your neighbor drives with Slurpee stains and soccer cleat marks in the carpet, but in Pakistan it's typically uglier, older, loaded with people, going 60 miles per hour and weaving through donkeys, cow poop, and trucks. And while we are painting a mental picture here, imagine the driver stoned on hash, the windows covered with stickers, the tires having cords showing through, the brakes having worn out last year, and an identical mechanism of death heading at a higher rate of speed directly toward you.

So when Achmed turns to wave at Abdul, the kabob vendor, he doesn't quite catch Wali heading at a combined 120 miles an hour toward him. Now, at this point, skill, luck, and religion have deserted you. Only the laws of physics and anatomy are in charge. As the two buses collide, your body decelerates from 60 miles an hour to zero in 2 milliseconds. Although the buses may have stopeed, Newtonian physics compel you through the non-safety plateglass window out into the bustling traffic, and into the crowd of the gawking bystanders who quickly surround your battered, bleeding body to scoop up your wallet and valuables. Not a pretty story. Having been at the site of many bus crashes in my travels, I can best compare the scene to putting a dozen mice in a coffee can along with glass and nails, slamming it against a wall, and then shaking it for a few minutes more. Then spray the bloody contents across the path of oncomming traffic.

...I'm sure you will never imagine yourself on one of these rickety, belching conveyances, but the first time you need to get from point A to B in countries where gum and deodorant are considered luxury items, you will indeed find yourself on one.


The Worlds Most Dangerous Places , Robert Young Pelton, Collins 2005


Yeah he goes to some dangerous places. In his book about pmc's I am pretty sure he went to into Indian country in Afghanistan.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 11:43:14 AM EST
Right now I am in the middle of reading Preacher by Garth Ennis. I read the first three volumes and had to take a break for a bit. It is a fairly disturbing book.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 11:44:01 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 11:47:33 AM EST
*Lone Survivor- Marcus Lutrell
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 11:48:47 AM EST
This month it's:

Eyes of prey by John Sandford

and

Haunted Homeland by Michael Norman

I've read a ton of Lovecraft,Phillip K. Dick and the like.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 11:48:55 AM EST
Charles Dickens - A Tale of Two Cities
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 11:53:36 AM EST
Not really reading it. I'm about half way thru "Ivanhoe" by Sir Walter Scott. It's an audio book I'm listening to on my commute.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 12:06:27 PM EST
Isn't DP, in the traditional sense, and dangerous places one and the same??

Link Posted: 6/17/2009 12:08:55 PM EST
I've had Force Recon Diary, 1969 sitting by me for a while now. Just haven't opened it yet
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 12:12:21 PM EST
Point of Impact, by Stephen Hunter. A fantastic book upon which the movie Shooter is based. The book is very insightful about the gun culture. Every gun nut here should read this book.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 12:13:53 PM EST
Originally Posted By prone:
Right now I'm reading Lone Survivor, I've heard so many here sing it praises, it's a damn good read.


Left my copy with a former SEAL I work with, then got laid off. Definitely will change how you look at SPECWAR types.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 12:23:50 PM EST
Originally Posted By JoseCuervo:
No, not that. Dangerous Places by Robert Young Pelton

Dangerous Places

I used to read his stories on the web back in the 90's, and then one day his site was just gone. I think that was the day he released version 1. I'll add some quotes later, he is a great writer. Now and again you see him on Fox and even CNN. This guy has been all over the world. If you are into adventure stories, get this book. The damn thing is about 4 inches thick but it reads fast.

Rob



I have earlier editions, they are really interesting reads and the author , his friends and colleagues have led extraordinarily interesting lives without a doubt. Check out Pelton's website here.

Link Posted: 6/17/2009 12:24:42 PM EST
Blackhearts by Nathan long
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 12:27:06 PM EST
Foreign Enemies and Traitors by Matthew Bracken.
Scarier than any Stephen King novel!
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 12:27:08 PM EST
I am reading "The Ghost War" by alex berenson.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 12:27:31 PM EST
Originally Posted By TwoTwentyThree:
Charles Dickens - A Tale of Two Cities


I like Dickens, Christmas Carol, Great Expectations, ect ect. but I just couldn't get into A Tale of Two Cities. Maybe 30 pages in I quit.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 12:41:55 PM EST
Just started "To Ride, Shoot Straight and Speak the Truth" by Jeff Cooper.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 1:03:30 PM EST
The Creature from Jekyll Island by G Edward Griffin - It is a thorough examination of the history of the Federal Reserve. Illuminating and frightening.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 2:10:51 PM EST
Originally Posted By 69firebirdconv:
Isn't DP, in the traditional sense, and dangerous places one and the same??



That's atually pretty funny, and very likely true.

Rob

Link Posted: 6/17/2009 2:25:51 PM EST

Link Posted: 6/17/2009 2:37:05 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/17/2009 2:38:08 PM EST by RockHard13F]
Originally Posted By JoseCuervo:
No, not that. Dangerous Places by Robert Young Pelton

Dangerous Places

I used to read his stories on the web back in the 90's, and then one day his site was just gone. I think that was the day he released version 1. I'll add some quotes later, he is a great writer. Now and again you see him on Fox and even CNN. This guy has been all over the world. If you are into adventure stories, get this book. The damn thing is about 4 inches thick but it reads fast.

Rob



RYP is indeed a fascinating character, and was one of my inspirations to get out and actually travel to some of the less travelled places in the world. In doing so I've made it a point to not only meet, but get to know people that others might not ever get the chance to, even at the risk of getting hurt. Good memories already, and a lot more to come I hope..

-Ben
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