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Posted: 8/18/2004 3:13:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 3:21:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 3:21:39 PM EDT by DoubleFeed]
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 3:39:11 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 3:55:18 PM EDT
Speaking of generators. A friend moved down to florida last year. The first thing I told him to get was a generator, he declined and now he has been without power for about four days.

What size generator is good for a 2600 sq ft house? They don't run AC, right? Just basic electric like lights and refridge. NOW he is talking about getting one.............told ya so.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 4:05:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
Only one member declined the ammo saying "Son I'm from Texas, do you really think this weapon is empty?"



Link Posted: 8/18/2004 4:09:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 4:09:43 PM EDT by Aahhyes68]
Generators......

Look into a 6000+ Tri-fuel generator, (auto transfer between the 3, gas,propane,nat ) Auto start isn't 100% necessary IMHO but nice.

Before you buy, look @ how long it runs on gas.... usually less than 8 hrs... I don't know about you fellas, but I don't store enough gasoline to last me 2-3 or + days...
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 4:16:27 PM EDT
Thanks, very informative thread. Excellent even for those who aren't really under the hurricanes, as a general survival guide.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 4:18:10 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 4:30:29 PM EDT
Tagged.


Good post Steyr.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 4:45:01 PM EDT
Good post. I lived in Broward at the time of Andrew, and helped out quite a bit down in Homestead. Water, food, camping gear...in that order. Fill up the car with gas too.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 4:57:49 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 5:00:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 5:01:53 PM EDT by Aahhyes68]
I agree, Thank's SteyrAUG....


Boring maybe, but I have what I think is an average story:

When those Bastards attacked our Country, I was compelled to arm myself and my Home with MORE than the average hunting rifles I had owned, for years and years....and I HAVE using my given rights.!!

When the Blackout, (this time last year) killed power to 60,000,000 people last year in the NE USA/Can for days just pissed me off and I swore I'd never get caught with my pants down again...... Terrorists, Fucksticks, nor Natural events will ever do that to me/My Family again...


I'm am sure I'm not 100% prepared, but much more so than I was........


Hell, it can't hurt.....
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 5:08:37 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 5:20:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 5:25:16 PM EDT by captainpooby]
Good post Steyr. I realized after this I wasnt prepared for a few things like not having a home. I figured it would be bug in till shit got fixed.
I was prepared to survive for a week and some folks down there are gonna be roughing it for much longer. I just gave all my supplies to friends in Lake Wales.
This has been a real learning experience.
Preparations for the next one begin now.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 5:22:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 5:28:41 PM EDT by SteyrAUG]
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 6:19:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:
Note to self: move close to but not in Florida and set up a business selling the above items - AFTER the hurricane goes through



DF,
Edited for you
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 6:46:09 PM EDT
My hurricane prep:



Self contained, 7.5 KW generator, fridge, washer/dryer, 90 gallons water, 90 galons gasoline.

Link Posted: 8/18/2004 6:50:53 PM EDT
Having a CHAINSAW wouldn't be a bad idea too....

In case a tree falls on your house. I would hate to have someone overcharge you to remove a fallen tree in a time of need. Right CampyBob?
Price Gouging Woes
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 6:59:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By entropy:
My hurricane prep:

www.fototime.com/9574115418F1F96/standard.jpg

Self contained, 7.5 KW generator, fridge, washer/dryer, 90 gallons water, 90 galons gasoline.




yeah but what about when a gust of wind hits it and it flys of the road?
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:00:39 PM EDT
blizzards
I wasn't born yet for the blizzard of 77, but I heard people were stuck in their houses for days in some areas


Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By MaverickMkii:
Thanks, very informative thread. Excellent even for those who aren't really under the hurricanes, as a general survival guide.




Yup, people also get tornadoes, earthquakes and fires.

Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:26:42 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:31:16 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:37:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
Best story I have is this one.

While rolling through the block we noticed flashlights on a second floor room of a house we knew was empty because the owner evacuated.

Dropped 2 guys in the back yard, two in the front, one on each side of the house and I and another guy went inside. We got to the top floor and heard 2 guys talking in the bedroom as they were going through drawers. We were running NV at the time and I slid past the door and down the opposite hallway. I gave my buddy the thumbsup and we switched off the NV and he yelled "Come out with your hands above your head right now."

2 black males emerged from the room mumbling some bullshit story about this being their "aunties house" and they were checking on it and getting some things for her.

My buddy told them to "Shut up and turn around and put your hands on the wall."

They continued with their BS story until my buddy told them "If you don't stop talking I am going to shoot you, turn around and put your hands on the wall right now." It began to dawn on them they may not be dealing with local cops.

Idiot #1 turned around and began to start his BS story again. I clicked on my streamlight (they had no idea I was to their right at all up to this point) and said "Do it now or you will be shot." The surpise of a second person and the shock of the streamlight made them shut up and put their hands on the wall.

We checked them for weapons (took a screwdriver and a couple knives off them), flex cuffed them and led them downstairs out the back door. We radioed our status to the guys outside and advised them we were coming out with 2 guests. Our 2 rear shooters who had been prone got up and walked over to us which very much surprised the 2 idiots in custody. We walked them around to the front picking up the side man and as we got to the front our 2 front yard shooters stood up.

To this the two idiots commented, "Shit there's white boys all over this motherfucker."

We parked them on the front porch and asked idiot #1 what they were doing inside since he seemed the most scared.

Idiot #1 - This is my aunties house and we was just checking on it and getting some things for her.

Us - This house belongs to Dr. Lowenstein who evacuated to Kendall.

Idiot #1 - Yeah, Dr. Lowensen, that is my auntie.

Us - Dr. Lowenstein is white and not married.

Idiot #1 - Yeah but my auntie knows him and he asked her to get some stuff for him.

Us - You wanna keep pissing us off by lying till we get sick of your shit and deal with you or you want to tell us the truth?

Idiot #1 - OK man I'm sorry we was in there taking shit.

Us - You want to deal with us or would you prefer we turn you over to the National Guard?

Idiot #2 (who suddenly felt the urge to speak) - Uh you can just be turning us over to the National Guards.

We left the property they had in their pockets in the house on a table and dropped the 2 idiots off at the NG post along with their weapons. They were only too happy to be taken into custody, I think we made them nervous.

You're Batman!

Way to go mon!
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:49:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 8:29:16 PM EDT
I don't suppose you have a pic of your hurricane shutters?
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 8:30:54 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 8:38:45 PM EDT
Tag
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 9:19:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Aahhyes68:
Generators......

I don't know about you fellas, but I don't store enough gasoline to last me 2-3 or + days...



Generators tend to consume lots of fuel, even when they're only supplying small amounts of power. This makes them impractical to operate continuously for more than a few days in an emergency.

The ideal situation is to run the generator for just several hours, several times a day to keep food in the fridge and freezer cold, operate the microwave oven, brew coffee, recharge batteries, etc. The rest of the time, an inverter can be used to run low-power stuff (TV set, florescent lights, etc.) instead.

Basically, the strategy is run the generator at near-maximum load for as little time as possible, and rely on battery power the rest of the time.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 10:01:10 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 11:13:35 PM EDT
I heard generators don't have much of a lifespan as well.
Something like 50-100 hours...
Link Posted: 8/19/2004 4:45:00 PM EDT
Great post Steyr ! Hell, I went thru Andrew, at work, 1/4 mile from the infamous CountryWalk, and I didn't think of a LOT of the things you did. Good, good advice. I do want to add a few things that could make life a bit easier, too. Keep 2 sets of hand tools (at least) in separate spots. I know of more than a few well-stocked sheds that literally blew away during Andrew. A good strong length of rope; for tying down or pulling limbs with the car/truck, etc. Propane bottles and the torch head for them.
MREs for a quick meal for you or an emergency hand-out for someone else. Somebody will thank you.
A roll or partial roll of plastic sheeting. A 6 mil x 20' x 100' roll should be $100 or less.
100 foot extension cords ... genset fumes are a danger and the loud noise that’s a pain at 50 feet or less is way more tolerable from 100 feet away. Also ... do you know how to hook up to a generator? Try it now. A few rolls of duct tape and a good pair of work gloves , or two. Consider strangers being able to walk in and through your house and think ahead about where you can secure valuables and or weapons? 15-20 feet of clear plastic hose for siphoning gas.
To your canned goods “stash” , think what can you add that won’t spoil and give you a treat and/or some variety. Stash some instant coffee, powdered creamer, sugar ...even if you’re not a coffee-drinker ... it’s a social thing. A small tri-fuel burner and a cook pot.
Solar shower; the hang-up plastic bag with a 2 foot hose from boating supply stores.
Try to cook an edible meal, outside, without power, for you and your family ... a dry run is “easy”now. Set up, ahead of time, a plan for the people you care about to call “someone” who is not in the storm area, and who can act as a switchboard to let anyone know who calls what the current sitrep is; is so-and-so allright, where people are, are they safe.
Think about your pets - too many were abandoned because they hadn’t been planned for and unfortunately were low on people’s priority list when the SHTF . Also, most animals you encounter will be shell-shocked, maybe less violent, but WAY less predictable ; We had quite a few “wild” animals from the Dade County Metrozoo on the grounds of the next-door Federal Prison. Not fun. Keep your sense of humor and an open mind ... you will be asked for help and may receive it from the most unlikely places. BTW bro ... you can reinforce my perimeter down in Dade any day.
Stay safe
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 3:27:32 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 3:28:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
Bumped cause someone could prolly will get nailed next week.

Link Posted: 8/30/2004 4:04:14 PM EDT
As someone who rode the eye of Hugo and drank ditch water and ate junk food that was scattered by the storm from a nearby conveinience store for 2 days, WATER, WATER, WATER and canned foods. A chainsaw is very handy too, after a major storm trees will be thrown everywhere making travel impossible.
Looting doesnt start until the roads are opened back up so you can focus on staying healthy till then.
I would never reccomend anyone ride out a major storm not unless you just WANT to spend 6 or 7 hours trying to stay alive. What I did was incredibly stupid in retrospect but incredibly fun when I was 23
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 5:11:42 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 5:29:50 PM EDT
To all of our Florida compatriots, property can be replaced, abiet some with difficulty, but its better "to live to fight again another day." You guys get the advantage of actually seeing it come toward you, unlike my Kali-fornia earthquakes, they just hit you suddenly. Stay safe.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 5:32:50 PM EDT
Ummmmm.................

DRIVE WEST !!!!!!!!!

Link Posted: 8/31/2004 5:38:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
Looks like we might take this one right in the face.

Pretty scary looking. Unlike Charley which blew through at a quick pace this thing is only going 17 mph. That is what Andrew did, slow moving powerful storm.

Take this one serious.



No kiddin, according to the latest path predictions its going to spend 24 hrs on top of Orlando or Jacksonville. I ve got a bad feeling about this one, Im betting on a 5+ at U.S. landfall
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 5:49:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By MaverickMkii:
Thanks, very informative thread. Excellent even for those who aren't really under the hurricanes, as a general survival guide.




Yup, people also get tornadoes, earthquakes and fires.




You don't have to live on the coast to be in trouble from the weather. During the Blizzard of 1993, we had 80+ mph winds, snow, freezing rain, and plagues of frogs & locusts. People in our county were out of power for up to two weeks after the storm, and we're right at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains. I was working for a local police dept. at that time, & we had our hands full for the first two days, until the National Guard got here to help out. Since no one had evacuated before the storm, most of the residences had people in them, so looting of houses was not a problem. But with all the alarm systems out & no street lights or security lights, all the businesses were wide open for anyone to hit.

After the storm, there were no generators, chainsaws or kerosene heaters to be had anywhere in the area. And for several days there was no way to get fuel for them anyway. So people had to make do with what they had on hand. Since our county is a big retirement community, I expected to find a lot of old folks dead in their houses after the first couple of days without electricity. It really amazed me how well the oldsters got along by making do. The worst injuries we had in the county were a couple of broken bones from falls on the ice. No fatalities at all. But after the cleanup was over, the generator companies did a landoffice business installing generators & transfer switches....
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 6:56:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
Looks like we might take this one right in the face.

Pretty scary looking. Unlike Charley which blew through at a quick pace this thing is only going 17 mph. That is what Andrew did, slow moving powerful storm.

Take this one serious.



I am in Orlando. I feel that we are going to get screwed by this one...


SteyrAUG, this post has been outstanding!! Thanks for the information...


Bigfeet


BTW: Local Home Depot is out of lumber this evening... Water is gone from most stores as well as most food now. People are left to buying canned goods...
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:15:21 PM EDT

BTW, anyone feel like selling their NVG's???


Bigfeet
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:36:28 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:49:20 AM EDT
You folks should check out the Survival Forum. 90% of the topics here have been extensively covered. Ops
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:50:25 AM EDT
Water, water, water...and more water. Canned goods and the means to cook them.

I think just repeating this over and over might help someone. If you have friends or relatives in the Peninsula of Florida, encourage them first to prepare, next to leave. This will be another powerful, dangerous storm.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 8:55:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/1/2004 8:56:04 AM EDT by Older_Crow]
I have a Generac 3500 watt gen that has been used several times in the past. After Gabrielle I ran it about two hours at a time, three times a day to feed the fridge and freezer. Two sets of neighbors would cart it off and then return it to keep their stuff cold/frozen.

The gen set went down to North Port after Charley. Lady that works with my wife was without power for a week. Just got it back last Friday.

My next gen set will be a Honda. Although much more expensive, they run quiter, better fuel economy and last longer.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 9:11:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Inatree:
No kiddin, according to the latest path predictions its going to spend 24 hrs on top of Orlando or Jacksonville. I ve got a bad feeling about this one, Im betting on a 5+ at U.S. landfall


Well, we might not be going to Disney next summer if that's so.....
Batten down the hatches, guys, and stay safe!
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 9:45:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Bigfeet:
BTW, anyone feel like selling their NVG's???


Bigfeet



Wow - good thinking! Have you checked your WalMart for the ones supposedly on clearance? I haven't found them cheap at any of mine.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 12:03:35 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 12:10:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
Here's another one, when the NG was sent out Lawton Chiles ordered them to NOT have ammo. The Miami Herald then reported this and immediately local gangs robbed NG members at gunpoint for their M16s.

When we heard of this we dropped off battlepacks to every NG member we saw and at every post in the area.

Only one member declined the ammo saying "Son I'm from Texas, do you really think this weapon is empty?"





Thanks for the laugh. That's priceless
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 12:22:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/1/2004 12:23:36 PM EDT by LauraCroft]
Good lordy...

I'm glad I ended up with that Benelli instead of a skeet gun.

Know how many "told ya so's" I'm gonna have to listen to?
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 12:26:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NCCop:
Since our county is a big retirement community, I expected to find a lot of old folks dead in their houses after the first couple of days without electricity. It really amazed me how well the oldsters got along by making do.



You have to remember, alot of "oldsters" have seen/been through way more shit than your average 35 year old. Around here, if you talk to a 75 year old, you have a pretty good chance of talking to someone that:

a) lived on a farm without electricity when young
b) a vet of some sort of war
c) likely a MUCH better shot with a rifle that by todays standards is antique
d) able to live wihtout things such as microwaves, computers, ATM cards, etc, since those have only been around for the last 25% of their life. The first 75% of their life that stuff didn't exist.

One of our hunting buddies died a couple years ago. He was 73. Man lived on a farm all his life. He could fix anything mechanical with bailing wire, and killed more deer by sneaking up to them with his 25-06 than I can remember. He was also deadly accurate with it, making some shots I can only dream of making. I have no doubt that he could survive for weeks without power. Kinda miss that guy, he had alot of cool stories about clearing Fiji islands after WWII. Dangerous job, that. Japanese inhabiting the islands that didn't know the war was over.

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