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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/24/2005 1:22:20 PM EDT
Have a bunch of night blooming jasmine in the yard. I love these things. Make the house smell great during open window weather.

Out doing some yard work in prep for the storm and the things have lost about 90% of their leaves and are covered in a white powderyresidue. Looks like talcum powder.

WTF is this crap?

Anyone know?
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 1:25:44 PM EDT
Stop peeing on them
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 1:27:45 PM EDT
Pollen. Breeding.

Vegetative growth slows or stops and flowering commences.

HS1
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 1:28:43 PM EDT
They are female plants.....that time of the year.

Sgat1r5
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 1:29:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
Have a bunch of night blooming jasmine in the yard. I love these things. Make the house smell great during open window weather.

Out doing some yard work in prep for the storm and the things have lost about 90% of their leaves and are covered in a white powderyresidue. Looks like talcum powder.

WTF is this crap?

Anyone know?



Fungus would be my guess. Any necrosis of the remaining leaves? Usually plants become susceptible to fungi and pests when under stress - too much or too little water, nutrients, light, heat.

Jasmine is picky.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 1:31:07 PM EDT
Did not know that.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 2:32:13 PM EDT
Powdery Mildew



Powdery mildew appears as a dusty white to gray coating over
leaf surfaces or other plant parts (Fig. 1). In most cases
this fungal growth can be partially removed by rubbing the
leaves. It might be identified incorrectly as dust that has
accumulated on the leaves. Powdery mildew, however, will begin
as discrete, usually circular, powdery white spots.



Symptoms usually appear late in the growing season on outdoor crops. The fungus is favored by periods of high relative humidity or site conditions that promote a more humid environment, such as close spacing of plants, densely growing plants, or shade.

Injury due to powdery mildews includes stunting and distortion of leaves, buds, growing tips, and fruit. The fungus may cause death of invaded tissue (begonia, for example). Yellowing of leaves and death of tissue may result in premature leaf drop. Nutrients are removed from the plant by the fungus during infection and may result in a general decline in the growth and vigor of the plant.


For outdoor ornamental plants, gather up fallen leaves in autumn and destroy them. Where powdery mildew is a problem, resistant varieties (if available) should be grown. If needed during the growing season, begin fungicide applications when the first white patches are noticed. Repeat as indicated on the product label during cool humid weather. Some products with a broad range of applications for outdoor ornamentals include products containing: Bacillus subtilis, jojoba or neem oil, potassium bicarbonate, sulfur or lime sulfur. Some of these products may also be used to treat powdery mildew infections in the vegetable garden. Other products may also be available, so refer to the appropriate pest management guidelines or contact your local Cooperative Exten
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 2:37:56 PM EDT
If you see little white insects flying around it's whitefly.

If no insects, powdery mildew.
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