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Posted: 12/30/2002 10:41:22 AM EST
I just got back from a trip to another country. I lost my hearing from sitting on the plane for 8 hours. The usual swallowing, and yawning didn't clear up my ears. How do I relieve the pressure in my ears? I caught a flu or cold so this might be the reason. But this has happened to me in the past. It usually takes about a week before I regain my hearing. I can barely hear someone speak, I also have hard time talking because it feels like I'm talking with my hands over my ears. If you can give me an advice, I would appreciate it greatly.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 10:43:55 AM EST
I had that happen to me once. I just went to sleep and when I woke up it was back to normal. I tried chewing gum, drinking stuff and everything else I could think of, but nothing helped. I'm curious to find something that works faster as well.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 10:43:58 AM EST
Pinch your nose. Blow hard. Make sure you're sitting down first. JK. You could blow an eardrum doing that.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 10:44:43 AM EST
Have you plugged your nose, closed your mouth and blown into your nose as hard as you can? That usually does it for me.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 10:45:56 AM EST
Originally Posted By Goet: JK. You could blow an eardrum doing that.
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Holy crap, really? I do it whenever I fly. I guess I should probably stop then.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 10:52:36 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 10:56:54 AM EST
Chimb: You're normally okay blowing when you don't have a cold. If it doesn't come out the nose, it comes out the mouth. If not the mouth, the eustachian tubes. Problem is, when they're stuffed up, you can cause some serious damage to your eardrums and such by putting extra pressure in there. Divers do the same thing. Hold nose and blow. I just wouldn't do it with stuffed sinuses.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 10:58:12 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/30/2002 11:00:51 AM EST by MarineGrunt]
Your cold is definately the reason. It will take a day or two for you to be 100% again. Just continue to treat your cold and you'l be fine. BTW- Try to avoid flying when you have colds, sinus troubles or any respiratory illness. This could lead to severe pain and you may also spread ilness to the other hundred or so people in that confined space.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 10:59:22 AM EST
I just got over that like a week and a half ago. It really didn't affect my hearing too much but when I talked I felt really dumb. You have no idea how loud you are talking or how you sound. I hate that. I'm curious on how I can get rid of this faster. Anyone else sometimes feel pressure rising then your ears get really itchy on the inside, this only happens about once a week but it's really weird?
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 11:05:47 AM EST
Quick Cure: antihistamine.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 11:08:42 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 11:09:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/30/2002 11:13:52 AM EST by MarineGrunt]
Originally Posted By EladEflow: I just got over that like a week and a half ago. It really didn't affect my hearing too much but when I talked I felt really dumb. You have no idea how loud you are talking or how you sound. I hate that. I'm curious on how I can get rid of this faster. Anyone else sometimes feel pressure rising then your ears get really itchy on the inside, this only happens about once a week but it's really weird?
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About the only thing you can do is follow the advice I gave above and maybe take a decogestant. If you must fly with a cold, it might help to take it before hand. Other than that, time is the only other cure. Edited to add: The reason you lost your hearing is because the amount of pressure difference you exposed you inner ear to irritated it and caused it to swell. Thats why it might be a little late for a decongestant.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 11:11:36 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/30/2002 11:12:14 AM EST by Torf]
Take your shoes off and with your bare feet on the carpet, make fists with your toes. Trust me, I've been doing this for 9 years.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 11:13:16 AM EST
Originally Posted By MarineGrunt: Your cold is definately the reason. It will take a day or two for you to be 100% again. Just continue to treat your cold and you'l be fine. BTW- Try to avoid flying when you have colds, sinus troubles or any respiratory illness. This could lead to severe pain and you may also spread ilness to the other hundred or so people in that confined space.
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Hehehe, I know what you mean. But there's a saying, what comes around goes around. I got sick because I was sitting next to someone who was sick when I started the trip. On the way back, I was sick. I hope people around me got what I have. JUST KIDDING!
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 11:32:49 AM EST
Could it be tone deafness? Listening to any sound for a length of time (supposedly) can cause deafness(hopefully temporary) in that particular sound-in your case proably the engine drone. We always used earplugs on the transport planes, and i used em once going to Hawaii on commercial flight(8 hours). Anybody do similar?
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 11:51:31 AM EST
As opposed to holding your nose and blowing, hold your nose and try to breathe through your nose. Always works for me. Again, though, probably best to be careful so as not to implode an eardrum.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 12:02:01 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/30/2002 12:04:29 PM EST by raven]
Originally Posted By Goet: Pinch your nose. Blow hard. Make sure you're sitting down first. JK. You could blow an eardrum doing that.
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Not if you're gentle and slowly increase the pressure. I do it all the time, my uncle the airline pilot taught me that. It's called the Valsalva technique. Also relieves pressure in your ears when you're diving. You know, when you get down to the 8'-9' depth and your ears start to hurt? Do the Valsalva, and the discomfort goes away.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 12:06:03 PM EST
That happened to me once when I had a bad cold. Basically the junk from your sinuses travels up in the Eustachian tubes at the lower pressure of high altitude, and then once you come down the higher pressure just packs it farther up in there. If it stays up there for more than a couple days it can get infected. It happened to me and I required prescription antihistamines plus antibiotics. My advice, take the strongest antihistamine stuff you can find over the counter, but if it takes longer than a week or if it becomes painful, take a quick visit to your doctor and get a scrip for the good stuff. Oh, and next time, dont fly with a head cold. It will get you every time.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 1:34:15 PM EST
That happened to me one time, didn't know I was sick until we landed... couldn't hear a thing. [size=1]WHAT?[/size=1] [size=2]WHAT?[/size=2] [size=3]WHAT?[/size=3] [size=4]WHAT?[/size=4] [size=5]WHAT?[/size=5] [size=6]WHAT?[/size=6] Took four days to clear up.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 4:31:49 PM EST
I just woke up from 6 hour nap. My left ear cleared up. However, my right ear is still clogged up. Its painful too.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 5:00:36 PM EST
Um, I'm no expert but since the cabin on a plane is pressurized why would you have to clear out your ears? Sgtar15
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 5:02:50 PM EST
My wife has to take these GIANT perscription decongestant tablets called Aquatab D two days before she flys or she gets terrible ear pain.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 7:54:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By sgtar15: Um, I'm no expert but since the cabin on a plane is pressurized why would you have to clear out your ears? Sgtar15
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Yes, the cabin is pressurized, but not to sea level pressure. When the airplane gets up to altitude, the cabin pressure runs around 8,000'. During climbs and decents pressure changes range between 50 and 200 feet per minute.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 10:32:04 PM EST
I guess I'm one of those sensitive people. But usually I can clear it with a yawn. I guess being sick on this journey didn't help a bit. I'll be flying again next month, hopefully the flight won't disrupt my hearing again.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 10:36:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/30/2002 10:47:12 PM EST by Graffiti]
Originally Posted By Cleatus: Could it be tone deafness? Listening to any sound for a length of time (supposedly) can cause deafness(hopefully temporary) in that particular sound-in your case proably the engine drone. We always used earplugs on the transport planes, and i used em once going to Hawaii on commercial flight(8 hours). Anybody do similar?
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Engine drone doesn't bother me unless I'm sitting near the wing. But thanks to you all for all the tips you have given me. This might or might not be related to the original topic but have you heard stories about people dying because they got blood clot while flying? I was scared being in coach/economy class for such a long flight (11+ hours). I think docs recommend that you avoid alcohol and caffeine during flight. Even healthy athletes can succumb to this blood clot so I took precautions this time. They said you need to get plenty of fluid (water) intake and move your arms and legs as often as you can. Some bastard got caught smoking a cigarette during the flight. He lit one up in the restroom. They made an annoucement over the PA but didn't get to see this loser's face. Yah, I've smoked pack a day in my days, but never had the urge to lit one up during long flights. I would've kicked his a$$ if I knew who it was.
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 10:39:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/30/2002 10:44:17 PM EST by prk]
Just for the hell of it, try a hot bath, if you don't have access to a steam room. If you don't have access to a tub, that's a problem. Also I remember on a plane, the FA gave a nearby kid a paper cup with a wet chunk of napkin inside to hold over his ear. Don't know if the water was warm or cold. Seemed to work -- anybody have more details?
Link Posted: 12/30/2002 10:47:06 PM EST
Originally Posted By Goet: Quick Cure: antihistamine.
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Quicker Cure: a Dremel Tool!!!
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