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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/23/2005 12:06:11 PM EDT
Alright, I want to learn how to weld. I am wanting to buy an Toyota Landcruiser FJ40 and most likely need to do some work to it. Should I sign up and take a class at my local community college or would buying books be the better route? If I was to buy a welder, what would be a good one to buy. Remember, I will be doing work on metal probably, at most, 1/2" think (most likely less than that) but would prefer to get something I know will get the job done.

Advice?

Nick
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 12:08:24 PM EDT
get some classes at the community college. after youve done it a few times and see what you like ask your shop teacher what would be the best for what you need.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 12:11:41 PM EDT
+1 on a class at a community college

Link Posted: 8/23/2005 12:19:10 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 12:30:18 PM EDT
i took a class at a local community tech school so I could learn to weld well enough to repair things I break on my truck and jeep.

in retrospect i would have just spent the money on a rig and a couple of books.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 12:31:43 PM EDT
Well I checked on classes, and my local community college doesn't offer it and the two other counties (Tarrant and Dallas) have the classes the complete opposite side of town from where I am, pretty good commute, but, if I want to learn, guess I'm going to have to drive, to bad freakin diesel is so expensive.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 12:32:06 PM EDT
Watch The Discovery Channel.

They may as well call it the Welding Channel now, for all the stupid motorcycle and car shows it runs.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 12:32:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By livefreeordieNH:
i took a class at a local community tech school so I could learn to weld well enough to repair things I break on my truck and jeep.

in retrospect i would have just spent the money on a rig and a couple of books.



Can you recommend any good books?
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 12:32:28 PM EDT
1/2"?!?

What exactly are you planning?

Thickest you will likely need is 1/4" for most trail rig fabbin'

The CC class is a very good idea, more hands on an questions will get anwererd right there.

But really, pick up a MIG (preferably 220V, but the Hobart Handlers 135A 110V units are nice)
Get some scrape tube, plate, angle, whatever, and start laying beads.

Learn the machine, learn to prep the surfaces, and learn to properly destroy your tests
to make sure your getting a good weld.

Like I say: "Weldors Get Better Penetration..."
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 12:33:38 PM EDT
You can't beat pro instruction with that said I taught myself with the help of a few books and a lot of practice. I will put my TIG welding up against anyone. It's important when first learning to practice and practice some more. Keep a log of amp settings and rod types for jobs it will help you later.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 12:40:25 PM EDT
What is the difference between MIG and TIG? Which one would suite me better for fixing things that break on my trail rig? What is oxyacetylene (gas) welding? Is that the same as MIG or TIG? Like I said, I am completely new to this, but want to learn how to do it.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 12:58:46 PM EDT
Just get a book and a welder.

Weld scrap metal together until you get it right.

To see how good your doing, you want to bend the weld. Weld together a pair of plates, and then cut it into tiny strips. You shouldn't be able to tell what was welded and what wasn't.

Then, bend those stips into a 'U' shape SIDEWAYS. That will let you see if you got good penetration and if you put enough heat into the weld. If you've got a really bad weld, the weld will tear.

Again, with a good weld, you shouldn't be able to tell the filler metal and the base metal apart.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 1:57:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By livefreeordieNH:
i took a class at a local community tech school so I could learn to weld well enough to repair things I break on my truck and jeep.

in retrospect i would have just spent the money on a rig and a couple of books.



+1. Complete waste of time for me. I didn't get one bit of useful instruction.

Merlin
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 1:59:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/23/2005 2:01:29 PM EDT by MachinegunManiac]
There are trade schools for welding.

If you wanna make some serious cash go for underwater(not sure exact name) welding, where you weld pipes and things under water. They make decent money, if you wanna go that route.


Never mind, I'm always replying after reading the fisrt line. You can go the community college route for that. Gotta get yourself a nice mig welder. Maybe after that Toyota you can make some money on the side with it by taking on other projects.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 2:09:29 PM EDT
I learned how to weld with a old gas setup that my grandfather gave me, some scrap metal, and a coat hanger.

Get somebody you know to show you how to do it, then practice.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 2:52:28 PM EDT
If I'm going to buy my own MIG setup what all will I need?
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 3:00:28 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 3:19:53 PM EDT
Check some of This Out.

Danny
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 3:20:19 PM EDT
id recomend some type of city/community ed classes over a community college.

community college classes will be more expensive.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 3:59:37 PM EDT
+1 on community college classes if available....mig welding is pretty simple stuff once you get proper training. you can get started with a lincoln setup for around 300-400 bucks...
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 4:02:48 PM EDT
I got a gasless wirefeed for $200 (cheaper than some cordless drills...not a major investment).

I messed around on a few scraps then started little projects like target stands and metal idpa style torso/head silhouettes that we ping the crap out of with our 22's.

Read the manual and go nuts. Then start talking to people you know who weld as you start getting a handle on what's going on.

My $.02
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 4:07:15 PM EDT
MILLER : MIG
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 5:50:40 PM EDT
Thanks for the feedback. I'm going go buy a book first and see how that works, if it doesn't, then off to class I go.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 6:19:00 PM EDT
mig is for pansies
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 8:17:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MDC85:
mig is for pansies



Nah, MIG is great for hobbyist welders and lots of pros use MIG welding too. It's seems like the easiest to learn. You can get decent welds with some scrap metal and some practice.


Oh and GREAT CHOICE on the Land Cruiser. You need to go to a few websites;

Toyota Land Cruiser Association www.tlca.org
IH8Mud www.ih8mud.com
Birfield.com www.birfield.com

There are some others but that's a good start. You should look at joining the Land Cruiser Mailing List which is on the TLCA website.

Link Posted: 8/23/2005 8:23:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MDC85:
mig is for pansies



...says the glow-in-the-dark squid.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 9:18:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Merlin:

Originally Posted By livefreeordieNH:
i took a class at a local community tech school so I could learn to weld well enough to repair things I break on my truck and jeep.

in retrospect i would have just spent the money on a rig and a couple of books.



+1. Complete waste of time for me. I didn't get one bit of useful instruction.

Merlin

+1. My Instructor was a Little Man Complex dickhead. Complicated by the fact that one of my buds in the class was giving it to his wife. Gas Welding. Got my welds properly strong, almost pretty, and dumped the class.

Learned Arc welding along with several friends by abusing the welding rig of one of their fathers. Birdshit welds on truck and dirtbike skidplates and tubing bumers, but nothing ever broke free.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 9:53:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/23/2005 9:54:39 PM EDT by Chida66]
My dad decided to learn to weld when the local welder he used to repair our farm equipment shutdown his buisness.

He went to the local vocational school (had to produce his HS diploma even though he was in his 50's and is a doctor) and learned all he needed to know.

I learned from him and now know stick and TIG. He has a MIG, but I never turned it on since I really perfer the TIG welding. Stick/arc is fast and penetrates nice. I made a hog trap by stick welding and a five foot tall candle holder for my wife with the TIG set up. The rest of my welding is fixing broken tractor parts.

Try to vocational school, you will save money in the end by learning what you need and how to do it right the first time.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 10:06:31 PM EDT
I picked up a decent MIG setup from lowes for about $450. I still need to buy a bottle for it to hold the gas, but can use flux core wire until then. It is not a 220, which everyone recommended. But for my use, which sounds similar to yours(I use it on my Scout) it works great. My welds may not be pretty, but they hold. And that is all I care about.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 4:38:15 AM EDT
I suggest a local technical college. At most votech type colleges you can pay to use ther equipment by the hour. Or you can take semister class to get the basics.

Ive neen a certified welder for over 15 years. Most of what you will learn will be on your own.

I do suggest by passing the oxy acetelyne course. Its used much less now days than other processes.

A MIG (metal inert gas ) process is about the best for home users. And you can purchase a rig for fairly cheap.

A small TIG welder (Tungston inert gas) is a good setup, but its much more difficult to perfect your method with one, but produces the finest welds if done by someone with experience.

DO NOT BUY a cheap brand of welder though, get a name brand so that you can get parts and support that goes along with it.

my 2 cents
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 5:26:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By crashburnrepeat:

Originally Posted By MDC85:
mig is for pansies



Nah, MIG is great for hobbyist welders and lots of pros use MIG welding too. It's seems like the easiest to learn. You can get decent welds with some scrap metal and some practice.


Oh and GREAT CHOICE on the Land Cruiser. You need to go to a few websites;

Toyota Land Cruiser Association www.tlca.org
IH8Mud www.ih8mud.com
Birfield.com www.birfield.com

There are some others but that's a good start. You should look at joining the Land Cruiser Mailing List which is on the TLCA website.




Thanks for the input. I've been looking at ih8mud quite a bit lately, just found it about a week ago, but have got some great info from it. Same with TLCA. I plan on joining once I get my 40. I am working on a deal on a 40 from Vegas right now from a friend, looks like it will be a good ride at an even better price.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 5:30:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By HELtEr:
I suggest a local technical college. At most votech type colleges you can pay to use ther equipment by the hour. Or you can take semister class to get the basics.

Ive neen a certified welder for over 15 years. Most of what you will learn will be on your own.

I do suggest by passing the oxy acetelyne course. Its used much less now days than other processes.

A MIG (metal inert gas ) process is about the best for home users. And you can purchase a rig for fairly cheap.

A small TIG welder (Tungston inert gas) is a good setup, but its much more difficult to perfect your method with one, but produces the finest welds if done by someone with experience.

DO NOT BUY a cheap brand of welder though, get a name brand so that you can get parts and support that goes along with it.

my 2 cents



Can anyone point me to a good website that sells good welding products. I did a google search and there are a ton of them. Would like to find one that someone has had dealings with and positive feedback before I drop some cash with someone I don't know anything about.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 11:56:32 PM EDT
Miller,Lincoln,Hobart are all name brand products. Check out ther websites and when you narrowed down the product you are leaning towards find a local dealer.
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 2:31:30 AM EDT
Sometimes there might be an and in the local paper for a short class on begining(?) welding. That would be definetly something to check out. I just got out of a year of school for welding, and I picked up oxyfuel, stick, wire, tig, and brazing.
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