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11/20/2019 5:07:11 PM
Posted: 10/27/2006 12:31:59 PM EST
What are those belts for that go around your waist and over your lower back? I've been doing stiff-legged deadlifts lately, and will probably get into regular deadlifts at some point. Are those belts designed to protect from back injury during such exercises or what? Who needs to worry about those belts?

Link Posted: 10/27/2006 5:06:04 PM EST
I use a Schiek nylon belt which has a conical shape and tapered sides to have a better ergonomical fit. Best damned weight belt I have ever used. I have a gentically weak lower back and use it for legs, bench and heavy back work. If I dont use it its a matter of time till I get an injury. I dont buy the "it makes you back weak" arguement some people go by. Injury prevention is too important to go without.
Link Posted: 10/27/2006 10:15:05 PM EST
It is for safety, especially for powerlifting when weights can get extreme.

I use one very similar to this.
Link Posted: 10/28/2006 8:26:28 PM EST
I just started training with a weight belt within the last week. A lot of friends/co-workers of mine have damaged their backs from heavy lifting, so I decided to protect mine while I'm still young.

I've just started using mine, it seems to work more as a reminder than a reinforcement. By that I mean, the belt doens't lock my back in position, but it makes it much easier for me to keep good form.

Weight belts seem like good preventative medicine, but at the possible expense of some core strength development (so the argument goes).
Link Posted: 10/29/2006 1:56:37 PM EST

Originally Posted By DevL:
I use a Schiek nylon belt which has a conical shape and tapered sides to have a better ergonomical fit. Best damned weight belt I have ever used. I have a gentically weak lower back and use it for legs, bench and heavy back work. If I dont use it its a matter of time till I get an injury. I dont buy the "it makes you back weak" arguement some people go by. Injury prevention is too important to go without.


Interesting. Thanks for the advice. What injuries specifically is it supposed to prevent? I have not used one before because I heard the "it makes your back weak" argument and was told that so long as I gradually move up the weight and don't take on too much at one time, then my back would strengthen along with the weight.

Maybe I should rethink this position.

So what injuries specifically is it supposed to prevent?
Link Posted: 10/30/2006 5:43:12 AM EST
Strained low back muscles or partially slipped disks. I have had both injuries more than once without the belt. I have tried benching over 300 without the belt and squatting 400 without the belt and my back was "OK" but I could tell any flase move or break in form from fatigue would have resulted in an injury. Thats strong enough for me if I am losing any strength in my lower back from always using the belt.
Link Posted: 10/30/2006 5:20:16 PM EST
Do enough deads and you wont have that problem belt or not.
Link Posted: 10/30/2006 8:17:49 PM EST

Originally Posted By killingmachine123:
Do enough deads and you wont have that problem belt or not.
Wrong. When you get into some seriously heavy weights, a lapse in concentration / form and it can be over, belt or no belt. A belt will help lessen the possiblity but not eliminate it. It happens to powerlifters all the time who do far more reps than your above average lifter. It won't matter how strong you develop your lower back. Push it to the brink and you are possibly gonna find a weak spot. Ask me how I know.
Link Posted: 10/30/2006 9:02:49 PM EST
Never used one, but I am thinking about getting one. A few weeks ago I was doing some really heavy squats for me and form was a little off. Well I straind my lower back a little. If I do get one, it will be only used for the heaviest of lifts, as I dont want to rob the development of my core and lower back.
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