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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/21/2005 10:19:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2005 10:23:45 AM EDT by arowneragain]
And now I'm been reading through the (sorry, guys!) Texas HTF.

Looks like everyone is staying.

(Though I realize Texas is a LOT bigger than LA, and many of those who are staying are NOT sitting right in the path and/or right where it will make landfall)


Anyway......hypothetical question:


You live:

50 miles inland, and 50 miles perepndicular to the expected path.
You have a generator and food and other basic supplies.
You are not employed in a public safety capacity.
You aren't in danger from flooding - only from the wind itself.
You have family 200 miles to the north.



Do you stay or go?



edit:


'go' means you visit the family 200 miles to the north.

The storm is Rita - an anticipated CAT4, IIRC.



Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:19:43 AM EDT

What Category of storm?
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:21:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2005 10:23:43 AM EDT by fight4yourrights]

We thought the NOLA residents were dumb for not evacuating.


Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:23:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BayEagle:
What Category of storm?



Rita; anticipated CAT 4, as i understand it.

Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:33:01 AM EDT
you can't have a hurricane party without a hurricane
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:36:53 AM EDT
Flooding is not a problem where my house located. It's the wind that will put pressure on the house. I have never left during a storm and Ivan was the worst I have encountered in the 13 years I have lived in Pensacola. Do I want to ride out another Ivan? Jury is out on that, but if I lived at or below sea level, my answer is a definite yes on evacuation for everything above a cat 1.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:43:13 AM EDT
It really doesn't bother me either way if you stay or if you go. It is YOUR choice. Just don't get angry at ME or anyone else if you choose to stay - and the SHTF - and you get covered in it. It was your choice. Own up to it.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:46:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Persephone:
It really doesn't bother me either way if you stay or if you go. It is YOUR choice. Just don't get angry at ME or anyone else if you choose to stay - and the SHTF - and you get covered in it. It was your choice. Own up to it.



I actually have a feeling that the average Texan may be better-prepared to 'deal with it' than the average NOLA resident.

Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:47:00 AM EDT
Unprepared NOLA residents: Stupid

Prepared Texans: Fiercely Independent
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:48:47 AM EDT
Biggest question, am I above or below sea level, and by how much?
If I'm 2 feet above sea level and thats the highest point, I'm leavin. If I'm 100 feet above sea level, different story. Then i start to see how strong the storm is.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 10:50:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2005 11:08:22 AM EDT by Max_Mike]

Originally Posted By macman37:
Unprepared NOLA residents: Stupid

Prepared Texans: Fiercely Independent



And the average Texan can just boast the storm in to oblivion.

When it comes to hot air Texas is king.

And really Texas ain't inner city NO.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 11:06:46 AM EDT
Staying unless it's Cat 5.

I'm 70 miles inland just outside the Northern Houston border in Spring.

I'm concerned with the winds and tree limbs flying in through windows.

I didn't flood in Allison, which was tons of rain after weeks of rain had saturated the ground, so I'm sure I won't flood in Rita. It's been very dry and the bayous and drainage ditches are low....
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 11:12:16 AM EDT
50 miles inland and 50 miles from landfall..... I'd probably bunker down unless I was subject to flooding.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 11:16:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Grunteled:
50 miles inland and 50 miles from landfall..... I'd probably bunker down unless I was subject to flooding.



What he said. Fifty miles inland is fifty miles inland.

Myself, I live only a few hundred yards from the beach, so it won't take much coaxing to get me to leave town.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 11:16:17 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 11:24:27 AM EDT
lets see texas...

<­BR>





­

put the wheels back on the "house" and back the truck up.

<­BR>

really though i would pack what i could and get out for a while. i don't think there will be looting like nola.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 11:35:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By arowneragain:


I actually have a feeling that the average Texan may be better-prepared to 'deal with it' than the average NOLA resident.




You're fairly smart for a TN resident.



Link Posted: 9/21/2005 11:59:23 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 12:13:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2005 12:19:32 PM EDT by gunman0]
Texas coastal towns are not below sea level. That was the problem in NOLA.

In Texas, as in the other Gulf states and Florida, there will be many roads into and out of the affected areas, most of which will be usable within 3 days. The second day the storm surge will recede and people will clear the main roads.

NOLA had only one, barely functioning, way for vehicles in and out. And even then, they could only access certain areas.

Staying is less of a gamble in TX, MS, AL, etc.

Of course, if they live within the deeper storm surge range of the coast and stay, they are idiots.
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