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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 10/12/2002 8:11:34 PM EDT
I want to know if there was talk of banning "sniper" rifles after JFK got shot? If they didn't do it then. Why didn't they, and why has America changed so much now that whenever there is some type of gun incident, the grabbers come out in force.
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 8:13:15 PM EDT
The Gun Control Act of 1964 was a direct reaction to the JFK shooting.
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 8:13:57 PM EDT
No, but after MLK and Bobby Kennedy we got the '68 GCA.
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 8:14:24 PM EDT
I thought it was the GCA of '68 after RFK and MLK...?
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 8:21:13 PM EDT
Originally Posted By RikWriter: The Gun Control Act of 1964 was a direct reaction to the JFK shooting.
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It was the GCA of '68, not '64. It was actually in response to Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King's deaths.
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 8:24:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/12/2002 8:25:12 PM EDT by raven]
Needing a FFL to mail guns to buyers is a law passed in response to JFK's assassination. I guess if Oswald hadn't ordered his POS rifle through the mail, JFK would never have been killed.
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 8:33:11 PM EDT
Originally Posted By raven: Needing a FFL to mail guns to buyers is a law passed in response to JFK's assassination.
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That was the GCA of 68. It had it's origins as a response to the JFK assassination. After Bobby Kennedy and Marty King Jr. it was inevitable. Of course we all remember that Chuck Heston who was at the height of his popularity at the time, was a strong supporter of the GCA of 68.
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 8:53:16 PM EDT
Thanks for the replies. When were the first gun-control measures passed nationwide? Anyone know?
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 8:56:30 PM EDT
Well there was a real big one called the National Firearms Act of...what...1934? Outlawed machine guns in civil hands...some other stuff too.
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 9:01:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/12/2002 9:06:44 PM EDT by faris]
The first nation-wide gun law was the 1934 Nation Fireams Act. The first major gun law was New Yorks' Sullivan Act. After the JFK shooting, most of the "banning" talk was about "Saturday night special" handguns. How this tied in to a sniper shooting of JFK wasn't explained. Gun banners usually don't feel the need to make sense. The major discussion was about mail order sales of guns, and that's what the banners focused on. Ah, for the good old days. I remember many a time the U.S. Postman coming to my door with a rifle in a box. No license, no paper work, no checks, no permission, no questions, and not too surprisingly, VERY little crime or trouble for anybody.
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 9:03:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/12/2002 9:04:48 PM EDT by KBaker]
[sigh] No, the 1934 National Firearms Act did [i]not[/i] "outlaw" full-auto weapons. It [i]licensed and registered[/i] them. Actually, it didn't really even do that. If you wanted to transfer a full-auto weapon, a short-barreled rifle or shotgun, a suppressor, or a "destructive device" like a mortar round, or if you wanted to transport it across state lines, you were required to [i]register[/i] the weapon or destructive device and pay a [i]tax[/i]. The tax on full-autos and short-barreled rifles and shotguns was $200 - in [b][i]1934[/b][/i] - when you could buy a shotgun for $5. There were other restrictions on pen guns and other types of firearms, too. Remember, the 1939 [i]U.S. v Miller[/i] case wasn't brought about because Jack Miller had a [i]banned[/i] sawed-off shotgun, it was because he had a sawed-off shotgun he didn't pay a [b]$200 tax on.[/b] And he'd transported that sawed-off shotgun across state lines. The Supreme Court didn't say the weapon was banned, they said they had "no knowledge" that it was a weapon useful for militia service. Which raises the question: What if Jack Miller had possessed a Browning BAR without a tax stamp?
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 9:12:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By faris: The first nation-wide gun law was the 1934 Nation Firearms Act. The first major gun law was New York's Sullivan Act. After the JFK shooting, most of the "banning" talk was about "Saturday night special" handguns. How this tied in to a sniper shooting of JFK wasn't explained. Gun banners usually don't feel the need to make sense. The major discussion was about mail order sales of guns, and that's what the banners focused on. Ah, for the good old days. I remember many a time the U.S. Postman coming to my door with a rifle in a box. No license, no paper work, no checks, no permission, no questions, and not too surprisingly, VERY little crime or trouble for anybody.
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The Sullivan Act of 1911? - Written by Thomas Sullivan, NY City counsel member as a tool to support his Criminal Enterprise. - He was later convicted of running an extortion racket gang which was demanding "protection" money from the immigrant business owners his law had disarmed.
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 9:21:10 PM EDT
Thanks again for the replies. Very educational. I've heard of a lot of these particular laws, but was having a hard time placing them in time. My dad tells me about "the good ole days" but it's not something I ever experienced. I'm 30 years old now and didn't own an AR till after the ban. What concerns me now is that my kids won't know what it means to have the same freedoms that I remember. What's worse, they won't even know it.
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 9:56:37 PM EDT
GCA of 68' was bad medicine! Required all center fire ammo purchases to be logged in a bound book, cal, qty and purchaser ID. (22 rimfire was exempted.) Modified the NFA of 34 to ADD a new class - Destructive devices. Import restrictions on machine guns, implements of war (they love this cause they can claim almost anything qualifies) and handguns. Required FFLs for interstate shipment of firearms. And a whole lot more. GOPA of 86 fixed some of this, but the last minute addition of the Hughes amendment added a restriction on manufacture of machineguns for civilian sale. - This is the foundation for all bans since. - It is vaguely phrased, and the ATF could have taken the stance that someone who properly filed a tax paid form 4 was "Approved" by the United States. But of course they did not. I remember the stupid Carter era when I was under 21. They would not sell me 223 because they had a T/C in 223 and during the ATF Compliance inspection the agent said that because they had that pistol in stock, all 223 was to be considered pistol ammo. They sold me 22LR, for which I owned 2 pistols, but no rifle. But would not sell me 223 for my Mini-14. My answer was to buy a Dillon RL450 press. The same gunshop sold me a reloader special package - 1000 Win 55gr. FMJBT, 1000 WSR primers & 4 1# cans of H335. [b]Thank God there was no restrictions on reloading components.[/b] I loaded 380acp, 9mm, 38spl, .357 mag, 44mag, 45acp, .223rem, .308win & .30-06 for my Garand - all before I was 21. I fear things will get bad again, and this time they will try to close those mythical loopholes.
Link Posted: 10/12/2002 10:05:11 PM EDT
The only "loopholes" that I am aware of are the ones that the politicians keep finding in the constitution.....
Link Posted: 10/13/2002 11:05:28 AM EDT
I know one damn thing, unless these stupid laws change Iam going to need a higher paying job to get me a MINI-GUN. Oh well at least there is BulletFest, at least I can look.
Link Posted: 10/13/2002 11:20:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By sociopath: The only "loopholes" that I am aware of are the ones that the politicians keep finding in the constitution.....
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Sir, I would like to buy you a beer .. [beer]
Link Posted: 10/13/2002 11:27:56 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/13/2002 3:15:23 PM EDT
Originally Posted By cluster:
Originally Posted By sociopath: The only "loopholes" that I am aware of are the ones that the politicians keep finding in the constitution.....
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Sir, I would like to buy you a beer .. [beer]
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As soon as I bail from this fascist state and move to Texas, I'll take you up on it.
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