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Posted: 6/19/2011 11:33:57 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/19/2011 11:36:04 PM EDT
[#1]
Professional instruction.
Link Posted: 6/20/2011 6:05:35 AM EDT
[#2]
learn cords .. then check out this guy on youtube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LN7HR6vWJo&feature=related
Link Posted: 6/21/2011 7:34:17 AM EDT
[#3]

Do you really want it or is the idea of playing guitar cool?  You have really want it.  If you don't want it more than the other things you are doing you'll never learn.
Link Posted: 6/21/2011 9:22:53 AM EDT
[#4]
What style of music are you trying to learn?
Learning the guitar is a slow process.  If you are trying to learn from tabs on the internet, you will get frustrated fast.  You will need some playing foundation to begin with, and some of the tabs are pretty bad.
Search Youtube, there is some good stuff in there if you look for it.
If you want to learn rock guitar, I would recommend any book from Troy Stetina, or The Everything Rock and Blues Guitar Book by Marc Schonbrun.  These books will give you the basics to build on.  Play along with the CD's included with the books to build your rhythm skills.  Practice your scales daily.  They will help you build up your playing speed and you will be able to improvise once you know how to use them.  Once you start to get good at playing scales, you notice that it will be a lot easier playing songs from Tabs.
If you are playing an electric guitar, always play through an amp (even if you use the headphone jack).  I believe that it will help you to learn how to play and cut out all the unwanted string noise.  I have heard people that sound great until they plug into an amp and they have a very sloppy sound.
Cut out all the outside distractions when you practice, turn off the tv.  Also set goals and plan out your practice time.  I always warm up with scales, then work on different techniques that give me a problem.  Then I will learn parts to a song I like.  Always break up the song into small parts.  Don't move on until you learn the part you are working on.  Practice stuff that you learned in previous practice sessions, and see if you improved.  I always give myself a little time at the end of a practice session to screw around.  A lot of people waste time practicing by getting lost just screwing around on the guitar.
When you mess up a scale or part of a song, stop and start from the beginning.  You are programing your mind to the point that playing it will become automatic.  If you continue to play through mistakes, you will have a hard time working through it.
If you practice right, you should notice improvement every week.
Like mentioned earlier, you have to want to play.  If you just got it to mess around on, you'll never get to the next level in playing.   Whenever I think it would be impossible to learn to play, I watch this video, it's amazing what you can do when you really want to:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSnUwA6c67k

Also I see the kids on Youtube playing some amazing stuff, like this kid:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SB-1ArmRdGo&feature=related  it is just amazing how easy they make it look, but they really spent the time practicing and wanted to learn.
Try to learn your fretboard.  Make flash cards with the notes, pull a card out of a hat, and find the note on different spots on the guitar.  Then when you learn your scale patterns, put them on flash cards and pull out a scale card and a note card to play the pattern in the key of the note selected.  Next, play the pattern and slide up or down and play the adjacent patterns.   This also works for chords.
 
Link Posted: 6/21/2011 4:52:54 PM EDT
[#5]
Good suggestions so far.

Also, try to find somebody to jam with. Preferably somebody who is more knowledgeable about theory than you are, that way they can show you stuff.... kinda like getting lessons for free.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 6/21/2011 5:42:35 PM EDT
[#6]
find a fav guitar player and learn some of their licks and see if playing guitar is still for you,if it is.
ask questions their are plenty of people who will help in anyway they can
Link Posted: 6/21/2011 7:54:53 PM EDT
[#7]
Quoted:

Make flash cards ...  


I still do this 20 some years later.

Link Posted: 6/21/2011 8:50:44 PM EDT
[#8]
Some more tips:



Get a good practice setup.  Get some kind of desktop amp (j-station, pod, V-amp) or a good practice amp (peavey vypyr).  Get a 1/8" jack to input sounds from your computer, into the amp.  Use headphones and you can play along with .mp3 files or lesson CDs.  I use a V-amp and a Peavey Vypyr for my practice rig.  I find that it is easier to blend the volume of the guitar with the mp3 with the v-amp, but the peavey (which I use most of the time now) has a more responsive sound.  It is important to sound close to the recordings to keep your interest, unlike the little solid state amps with a 25 buck fuzz box of my youth.  



Do yourself a favor a pick up a copy of the Guitar Pro Software. I have seen it on ebay for under 50 bucks.



When you start to get good, check out this website:  http://www.guitarbackingtrack.com/



I can't stress enough to organize your practice routines to get the most out of the time you spend.  I read in a book that John Petrucci is known to plan out his practice sessions by the minute and keeps a filing cabinet full of articles and material to pull out a practice.  You don't have to plan it out that much but it helps to plan would you are going to practice and set goals for yourself.  Also a lot of people keep a log of their practice sessions so they can track their progress.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 6:27:04 PM EDT
[#9]
I've always found, that learning songs that you really like, is easier than learning crap you really don't want to play.

If it's just a hobby, forget about the chords, and scales for now, and learn your favorite song instead. It'll keep you interested in playing, and you can always learn the "real" stuff later.
Link Posted: 6/23/2011 8:11:06 AM EDT
[#10]
Quoted:
Some more tips:

Get a good practice setup.  Get some kind of desktop amp (j-station, pod, V-amp) or a good practice amp (peavey vypyr).  Get a 1/8" jack to input sounds from your computer, into the amp.  Use headphones and you can play along with .mp3 files or lesson CDs.  I use a V-amp and a Peavey Vypyr for my practice rig.  I find that it is easier to blend the volume of the guitar with the mp3 with the v-amp, but the peavey (which I use most of the time now) has a more responsive sound.  It is important to sound close to the recordings to keep your interest, unlike the little solid state amps with a 25 buck fuzz box of my youth.  

Do yourself a favor a pick up a copy of the Guitar Pro Software. I have seen it on ebay for under 50 bucks.

When you start to get good, check out this website:  http://www.guitarbackingtrack.com/

I can't stress enough to organize your practice routines to get the most out of the time you spend.  I read in a book that John Petrucci is known to plan out his practice sessions by the minute and keeps a filing cabinet full of articles and material to pull out a practice.  You don't have to plan it out that much but it helps to plan would you are going to practice and set goals for yourself.  Also a lot of people keep a log of their practice sessions so they can track their progress.


Thanks for the great site. I think I'll really like the songster moving tabs.I wish I had more time to practice. I'd like to play like a 9 yr old some day.

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