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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 11/19/2012 3:59:28 PM EST
Its that time of year. Lots of ways to do it but this is a good primer on what to do if you have no idea.



Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:03:13 PM EST
Good episode although, in my experience, the turkey derrick is completely unnecessary. A pair of welding gloves and the hook included in the frying kit work just fine.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:29:34 PM EST
Originally Posted By 25Chuck:
Good episode although, in my experience, the turkey derrick is completely unnecessary. A pair of welding gloves and the hook included in the frying kit work just fine.




Completely unnecessary. i think that maybe he did it out of possible liability. Just dont be a fucking retard and toss a turkey into the oil and your probably going to be good to go.

Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:38:48 PM EST
I just turn off the flame right before I lower in the turkey with the supplied hook. Once the bird is down, I re-ignite the flame and adjust the temp, cook for 3.5 min/pound @ 350 and remove. rest 5 minutes, carve and serve.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 5:28:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/19/2012 5:29:16 PM EST by Zhukov]
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 5:49:30 PM EST
Originally Posted By Zhukov:

Originally Posted By 25Chuck:
Good episode although, in my experience, the turkey derrick is completely unnecessary. A pair of welding gloves and the hook included in the frying kit work just fine.

It's completely unnecessary - unless your oil is too hot, the flame is still on, and some of the oil spills out creating a jet engine blast of burning oil that will make sure you'll never use that arm again.

I'd agree that it is a liability issue assuming you take a few precautions. You can't be too safe if you're going to show it on TV considering the wide variance in your audience's IQ. You know what though? Now that I think about it, rigging up a stepladder to lower the turkey in wouldn't really be a huge hassle.


Oh, I'm not at all suggesting that it isn't dangerous, but it is much less dangerous if you are careful and know what you are doing. I'd bet a hefty percent of the accidents come from guys who pound a liter of Jim Beam and then try to slam dunk a 20lb frozen bird into their turkey fryer which is conveniently located in their garage.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 6:07:21 PM EST
Four years of manually lowering the turkey into the hot oil yielded great turkey and no problems - even the year I had to cook two.

HOWEVER, last year I used the derrick approach using a ladder and not only was it much easier to control the bird's descent, it was way easier on my poor old-fart back.

I know which way I'm doing it this year...

Just sayin' - Happy Thanksgiving to all!

Link Posted: 11/20/2012 3:43:49 PM EST
Originally Posted By 25Chuck:
Originally Posted By Zhukov:

Originally Posted By 25Chuck:
Good episode although, in my experience, the turkey derrick is completely unnecessary. A pair of welding gloves and the hook included in the frying kit work just fine.

It's completely unnecessary - unless your oil is too hot, the flame is still on, and some of the oil spills out creating a jet engine blast of burning oil that will make sure you'll never use that arm again.

I'd agree that it is a liability issue assuming you take a few precautions. You can't be too safe if you're going to show it on TV considering the wide variance in your audience's IQ. You know what though? Now that I think about it, rigging up a stepladder to lower the turkey in wouldn't really be a huge hassle.


Oh, I'm not at all suggesting that it isn't dangerous, but it is much less dangerous if you are careful and know what you are doing. I'd bet a hefty percent of the accidents come from guys who pound a liter of Jim Beam and then try to slam dunk a 20lb frozen bird into their turkey fryer which is conveniently located in their garage.


Any one who deals with the public on a daily basis can testify that the majority of people lack any sort of common sense.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 3:46:43 PM EST
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