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Posted: 7/1/2015 11:41:04 AM EDT
So,

We generally tolerated the german wermacht soldiers after the war, most claimed they weren't Nazis and were enlisted tankers, etc. They went on to hang their uniforms in the closet, have pictures on the wall and tell stories to their grandchildren today.

How would that have gone down on the east side of things, I'm not thinking the Russians would have been too fond of any veteran they found, or knew had served during the war.

Anyone got any input on this?
Link Posted: 7/1/2015 11:42:17 AM EDT
[#1]
Quoted:
So,

We generally tolerated the german wermacht soldiers after the war, most claimed they weren't Nazis and were enlisted tankers, etc. They went on to hang their uniforms in the closet, have pictures on the wall and tell stories to their grandchildren today.

How would that have gone down on the east side of things, I'm not thinking the Russians would have been too fond of any veteran they found, or knew had served during the war.

Anyone got any input on this?
View Quote


It's simple. You towed the line or you took a free vacation to Siberia
Link Posted: 7/1/2015 11:46:20 AM EDT
[#2]
The wife's great uncles were released from Russian camps after serving in the Wehrmacht.  They happened to settle in the west.  I doubt the Russians occupying East Germany would care much about former soldiers released by Moscow.

However, my MIL's entire family was ethnically cleansed from family lands they had owned for centuries in the Czech Republic.  They were forced to move to Germany and never give a cent in compensation; they lost everything and were happy to escape with their lives (other civilians were not so lucky).
Link Posted: 7/1/2015 11:48:21 AM EDT
[#3]
(double post!)

If you are interested in life in the GDR, you can find a YouTube documentary called "The Lost world of Communism" that isn't bad.  Not much of anything on soldiers though.
Link Posted: 7/1/2015 11:51:17 AM EDT
[#4]
My Oma's brother was captured at the Battle of Voronezh in 1943.  He spent the rest of the war and a few years afterwards in a work camp.

Lived almost to 100 years old, though he bore some significant scars earned at the hands of his Soviet captors.

(My Opa died at the same battle...officially MIA, but thousands of Germans went missing on the Eastern Front)

Interestingly, my family is Sudetendeutsch.  At the conclusion of the war, the Soviets appointed administrators over Bohemia.  My Oma told me that they would routinely go from house to house, raping and murdering the widows and daughters of dead and missing German soldiers before the ultimate decision was made to expel them all from the region.  She never would tell me if the same abuse was visited upon her, but she was a tough lady and I'm sure she bore quite a few internal wounds from that period.

Link Posted: 7/1/2015 11:52:25 AM EDT
[#5]
Some German POW's were kept in Soviet prison camps until 1956
Link Posted: 7/1/2015 11:55:13 AM EDT
[#6]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


My Oma's brother was captured at the Battle of Voronezh in 1943.  He spent the rest of the war and a few years afterwards in a work camp.



Lived almost to 100 years old, though he bore some significant scars earned at the hands of his Soviet captors.



(My Opa died at the same battle...officially MIA, but thousands of Germans went missing on the Eastern Front)



Interestingly, my family is Sudetendeutsch.  At the conclusion of the war, the Soviets appointed administrators over Bohemia.  My Oma told me that they would routinely go from house to house, raping and murdering the widows and daughters of dead and missing German soldiers before the ultimate decision was made to expel them all from the region.  She never would tell me if the same abuse was visited upon her, but she was a tough lady and I'm sure she bore quite a few internal wounds from that period.



View Quote




 
Goddamn Russian bastards.
Link Posted: 7/1/2015 12:01:21 PM EDT
[#7]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
My Oma's brother was captured at the Battle of Voronezh in 1943.  He spent the rest of the war and a few years afterwards in a work camp.

Lived almost to 100 years old, though he bore some significant scars earned at the hands of his Soviet captors.

(My Opa died at the same battle...officially MIA, but thousands of Germans went missing on the Eastern Front)

Interestingly, my family is Sudetendeutsch.  At the conclusion of the war, the Soviets appointed administrators over Bohemia.  My Oma told me that they would routinely go from house to house, raping and murdering the widows and daughters of dead and missing German soldiers before the ultimate decision was made to expel them all from the region.  She never would tell me if the same abuse was visited upon her, but she was a tough lady and I'm sure she bore quite a few internal wounds from that period.

View Quote


My grandfather did everything in his power to surrender to the Americans along with all his fellow men.  At the time as a soldier in the Waffen SS most were not taken prisoner and were shot on sight by allies.  He eventually surrendered wearing a Wehrmacht uniform (he did not have the blood group tattoo) so was never found out.  His brother was captured by the Russians and was never seen or heard from again.
Link Posted: 7/1/2015 12:06:26 PM EDT
[#8]
My Grandma's family were Prussians and she remembers sending them care packages. After the wall went up they never heard from them again.
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