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Posted: 4/11/2016 9:57:36 AM EDT
Well, Friday I got accepted to the rescue squad and the 23rd I start my training. Aside from the core stuff for driver, medic and emt is there any courses on the side that I would benefit from?
Link Posted: 4/12/2016 7:25:40 AM EDT
Auto extrication, at least a basic class,to be familiar with what the guys on the outside will be doing while your inside doing stabilization.
Link Posted: 4/12/2016 4:00:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/12/2016 4:01:45 PM EDT by FFmedicAdam]
You'll have your hands full. You said you were looking at EMT and a medic class. I assume you know those are different things. Spend some time as an EMT-B for a while before you make the jump to medic. Your ALS will only be good if you have a good BLS foundation to work from.

Edit for clarity.
Link Posted: 4/12/2016 9:55:59 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By FFmedicAdam:
You'll have your hands full. You said you were looking at EMT and a medic class. I assume you know those are different things. Spend some time as an EMT-B for a while before you make the jump to medic. Your ALS will only be good if you have a good BLS foundation to work from.

Edit for clarity.
View Quote


I will, but I feel like this will also be helpful to me later on down the road also. I do plan on staying at EMT-B or so before I further on. Medic would be later on in life, few years later on.

Auto extrication I would do anyhow, I may do hazmat just for the certs since two other people on my squad has it. 3rd person to have it on the squad couldn't hurt anything.
Link Posted: 4/12/2016 10:03:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/13/2016 10:33:54 AM EDT
Go find the FEMA training website, set yourself up with a SID, and take everything that has the words NIMS and ICS in it...
Link Posted: 4/13/2016 12:54:40 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By ZW17:
My advice would be to feel your department out before you invest a ton of time into it.

I recently left a volly department after investing an entire summer in training, two nights a week and every Saturday. I had a lot of previous experience and it turns out this department was run by completely incompetent people so much so that I feared getting hurt, not to mention the politics of the good old boys club. So everything I invested was a complete waste.

Get your feelers out before you commit, don't let people tell you how awesome they are, make them prove it first. Joining a volunteer fire dept can be a great experience as long as it's run right.

Watch your own ass.
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I got mixed feels about some of the people there. Training lady seems OK. though. How was it a complete waste? You got the training and knowledge out of it and can take that with you someplace else cant you.?
Link Posted: 4/13/2016 12:58:54 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By high_order1:
Go find the FEMA training website, set yourself up with a SID, and take everything that has the words NIMS and ICS in it...
View Quote



If I did the correct ones they are IS-00800.B - National Response Framework, An Introduction and IS-00700.A - NIMS, An Introduction.

Still pondering on if the 800 is the correct one, 11 PM is way to late to be doing this shit.
Link Posted: 4/13/2016 1:04:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/13/2016 1:05:07 PM EDT by ZW17]
Link Posted: 4/13/2016 1:27:50 PM EDT
I think that's required here as well, vaguely remember something about it, WV here though.
Link Posted: 4/13/2016 10:00:20 PM EDT
Pretty much everywhere requires iso700 and iso800.
Link Posted: 4/14/2016 1:11:13 AM EDT
NIMS ICS100 and 200. along with 700. If you get the chance take 300, it is classroom based but okay.

PALS, ACLS will come with Medic class. So as a EMT-B/A take PHTLS/ITLS.
Link Posted: 4/14/2016 6:16:10 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/18/2016 8:01:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/18/2016 8:31:10 AM EDT by Hammer2013]
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Originally Posted By MedicBob:
NIMS ICS100 and 200. along with 700. If you get the chance take 300, it is classroom based but okay.

PALS, ACLS will come with Medic class. So as a EMT-B/A take PHTLS/ITLS.
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I'll keep that in mind. Thanks.

ok I just had a brain fart since my coffee hasn't set in yet. I have done NIMS 700.A and NRF 800.B. Is NIMS 100 the 100.HCb and 200 the Appling ICS to Heath Care organizations? I'm hoping I have done the correct ones so far.

LINK
Link Posted: 4/18/2016 9:53:54 AM EDT
It depends. We took the plain IS100, 200, and 300. I think they are the .b ones. We did not do the health care specific as that is more geared towards hospitals I believe. Check with your state to see which ines they require or recommend.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 8:49:40 PM EDT
Rescue Squad is a pretty vague term

Is it some kind of medical first responder service? Urban Search And Rescue? Fire Department? 911 transport service?
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 11:03:45 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By FFmedicAdam:
You'll have your hands full. You said you were looking at EMT and a medic class. I assume you know those are different things. Spend some time as an EMT-B for a while before you make the jump to medic. Your ALS will only be good if you have a good BLS foundation to work from.

Edit for clarity.
View Quote


Respectfully, I disagree. You could spend 10 years as a volunteer EMT-B responding to calls for a BLS non-transport FD that does 250 calls a year (much less the ones you actually make), and you'll never get the experience an EMT-B working for a busy ALS service that does 911 response and interfacility transports will. Not to mention the quality of the continuing education and QA/QI process.

Experience gained as an EMT-Basic is highly dependent on where you are able to use your certification. As they say, YMMV.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 5:27:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/20/2016 5:29:49 PM EDT by Hammer2013]
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Originally Posted By DeadSled:
Rescue Squad is a pretty vague term

Is it some kind of medical first responder service? Urban Search And Rescue? Fire Department? 911 transport service?
View Quote



basicllly BLS/ALS and some fire rescue.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:00:57 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By nick89302:


Respectfully, I disagree. You could spend 10 years as a volunteer EMT-B responding to calls for a BLS non-transport FD that does 250 calls a year (much less the ones you actually make), and you'll never get the experience an EMT-B working for a busy ALS service that does 911 response and interfacility transports will. Not to mention the quality of the continuing education and QA/QI process.

Experience gained as an EMT-Basic is highly dependent on where you are able to use your certification. As they say, YMMV.
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Originally Posted By nick89302:
Originally Posted By FFmedicAdam:
You'll have your hands full. You said you were looking at EMT and a medic class. I assume you know those are different things. Spend some time as an EMT-B for a while before you make the jump to medic. Your ALS will only be good if you have a good BLS foundation to work from.

Edit for clarity.


Respectfully, I disagree. You could spend 10 years as a volunteer EMT-B responding to calls for a BLS non-transport FD that does 250 calls a year (much less the ones you actually make), and you'll never get the experience an EMT-B working for a busy ALS service that does 911 response and interfacility transports will. Not to mention the quality of the continuing education and QA/QI process.

Experience gained as an EMT-Basic is highly dependent on where you are able to use your certification. As they say, YMMV.


No doubt that running 5 calls a month isn't going to make for a lot of experience. But becoming a basic, never running any calls and going right to a medic program is generally a recipe for disaster. There is always the exception to the rule that goes b to p right off the bat and is a crazy good medic, but in my experience it is pretty rare.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 12:10:06 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By FFmedicAdam:


No doubt that running 5 calls a month isn't going to make for a lot of experience. But becoming a basic, never running any calls and going right to a medic program is generally a recipe for disaster. There is always the exception to the rule that goes b to p right off the bat and is a crazy good medic, but in my experience it is pretty rare.
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Originally Posted By FFmedicAdam:
Originally Posted By nick89302:
Originally Posted By FFmedicAdam:
You'll have your hands full. You said you were looking at EMT and a medic class. I assume you know those are different things. Spend some time as an EMT-B for a while before you make the jump to medic. Your ALS will only be good if you have a good BLS foundation to work from.

Edit for clarity.


Respectfully, I disagree. You could spend 10 years as a volunteer EMT-B responding to calls for a BLS non-transport FD that does 250 calls a year (much less the ones you actually make), and you'll never get the experience an EMT-B working for a busy ALS service that does 911 response and interfacility transports will. Not to mention the quality of the continuing education and QA/QI process.

Experience gained as an EMT-Basic is highly dependent on where you are able to use your certification. As they say, YMMV.


No doubt that running 5 calls a month isn't going to make for a lot of experience. But becoming a basic, never running any calls and going right to a medic program is generally a recipe for disaster. There is always the exception to the rule that goes b to p right off the bat and is a crazy good medic, but in my experience it is pretty rare.


Fair enough. I think we're on the same page.

Good luck OP, and try to have fun. But remember that people get to choose their doctor, they don't get to choose their paramedic. Be the best you can be.


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Link Posted: 4/23/2016 2:03:09 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By nick89302:


Fair enough. I think we're on the same page.

Good luck OP, and try to have fun. But remember that people get to choose their doctor, they don't get to choose their paramedic. Be the best you can be.


Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
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Originally Posted By nick89302:
Originally Posted By FFmedicAdam:
Originally Posted By nick89302:
Originally Posted By FFmedicAdam:
You'll have your hands full. You said you were looking at EMT and a medic class. I assume you know those are different things. Spend some time as an EMT-B for a while before you make the jump to medic. Your ALS will only be good if you have a good BLS foundation to work from.

Edit for clarity.


Respectfully, I disagree. You could spend 10 years as a volunteer EMT-B responding to calls for a BLS non-transport FD that does 250 calls a year (much less the ones you actually make), and you'll never get the experience an EMT-B working for a busy ALS service that does 911 response and interfacility transports will. Not to mention the quality of the continuing education and QA/QI process.

Experience gained as an EMT-Basic is highly dependent on where you are able to use your certification. As they say, YMMV.


No doubt that running 5 calls a month isn't going to make for a lot of experience. But becoming a basic, never running any calls and going right to a medic program is generally a recipe for disaster. There is always the exception to the rule that goes b to p right off the bat and is a crazy good medic, but in my experience it is pretty rare.


Fair enough. I think we're on the same page.

Good luck OP, and try to have fun. But remember that people get to choose their doctor, they don't get to choose their paramedic. Be the best you can be.


Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


Damn right there. The day you have a parent throw their kid in your arms on the worst day of their life you better be bringing the A game. The only way to bring the A game is to have one in the first place. And the only way to have one is to work your ass off to be the best you possibly can. I don't know how old you are, but nobody sees your age, or how long you've been doing this, they see a guy in a uniform and just know you can fix this. You can't always fix it, but you better bring your best and bring it to bare, if not you are wasting your time and their hope. Sounds dramatic, but it's true.
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