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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 4/6/2006 6:37:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/6/2006 6:39:42 PM EDT by Corey]
What's it like? How much stick time do you get? Is most of it just flying pretty routine patterns? How much time in the seat do you get pushing the aircraft's performance envelope?

What and the heck does it feel like to be up there in control of a jet like that?

And last but not least, what is it like doing a carrier landing? Do you ever get used to them, or is every one stressful?

Nothing classified, but I'm just sure that we've all dreamed about what it was like as a combat pilot. I see the F16's doing take off and landing patterns over Madison and wonder if that ever gets boring. Then a few days later I see a group of them tear off over the horizon trying to catch the lead jet and wonder if boring could ever be a word applied to these machines.

If any other military pilots care to contribute to this, all the better. And if any other members have specific questions, maybe you could indulge them as well.

AR15.com has an amazingly broad spectrum of members from all walks of life. But I'd bet that few have jobs as coveted as fighter pilots.

Thanks,

Corey

EDITED for typos.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 6:03:32 AM EDT
Bump!

You out there Valheru? Probably out flying jets.



Corey
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 6:05:01 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 6:09:09 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 6:21:55 AM EDT
Tagged to read pilots responses.

Good topic Corey.



Link Posted: 4/7/2006 9:41:33 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 12:36:23 PM EDT
I think that there has to be at least 1 hour in the morning and 1 in the evening set aside for "do I look cool" checks. Beyond that I'm not too sure.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 12:37:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By H46Driver:
I think that there has to be at least 1 hour in the morning and 1 in the evening set aside for "do I look cool" checks. Beyond that I'm not too sure.


My understanding is it's two hours a day for jets, 1.5 hours for fixed wing and 1 hour for helo pilots.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 12:39:05 PM EDT
I cannot remember his board name, but I know we also have a lawn dart driver here.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 12:40:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dport:

Originally Posted By H46Driver:
I think that there has to be at least 1 hour in the morning and 1 in the evening set aside for "do I look cool" checks. Beyond that I'm not too sure.


My understanding is it's two hours a day for jets, 1.5 hours for fixed wing and 1 hour for helo pilots.



3 hours a day for AF jet drivers.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 12:42:44 PM EDT
tag for stories
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 12:48:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dport:

Originally Posted By H46Driver:
I think that there has to be at least 1 hour in the morning and 1 in the evening set aside for "do I look cool" checks. Beyond that I'm not too sure.


My understanding is it's two hours a day for jets, 1.5 hours for fixed wing and 1 hour for helo pilots.



Helo pilot "look cool" checks? Oh that's right, you're used to LAMPS guys so I believe it.

I only do the "look cool" check when flying cheerleaders. Most of the time the results aren't so hot.



Link Posted: 4/7/2006 12:54:01 PM EDT
.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 12:55:57 PM EDT




Well, two out of the three look cool.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 12:58:20 PM EDT
I'd imagine it goes something like this:

both the throttles at full afterburner and the catapult kick you in the back as the aircraft accelerates. Once clear of the deck, raise the gear. Once sufficient airspeed is reached, raise the flaps. Look at the fuel gauge - declare "bingo fuel" and turn around to land. If there's any traffic and it takes more than a few minutes to land, declare a fuel emergency.

(Just making fun of the Hornets infamous shortcomings in range and endurance, although the superbug is slightly better )
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 1:01:11 PM EDT
Not exactly what the poster was asking, but I'll throw it in. The letter is from a USN fighter pilot who spend 3 years on an exchange tour flying F-15s with the USAF. Granted, in the days of AEFs the comments about time away from home may be slightly OBE but... The letter was in response to a young man (a prospective pilot) asking which service academy he should attend. Hope you enjoy.


Young Man,

Congratulations on your selection to both the Naval and Air Force Academies.
Your goal of becoming a fighter pilot is impressive and a fine way to serve your
country. As you requested, I'd be happy to share some insight into which service
would be the best choice. Each service has a distinctly different culture. You
need to ask yourself "Which one am I more likely to thrive in?"

USAF Snapshot:

The USAF is exceptionally well organized and well run. Their training programs
are terrific. All pilots are groomed to meet high standards for knowledge and
professionalism. Their aircraft are top- notch and extremely well maintained.
Their facilities are excellent. Their enlisted personnel are the brightest and
the best trained. The USAF is homogenous and macro. No matter where you go,
you'll know what to expect, what is expected of you, and you'll be given the
training & tools you need to meet those expectations. You will never be put in a
situation over your head. Over a 20-year career, you will be home for most
important Family events. Your Mom would want you to be an Air Force pilot...so
would your wife. Your Dad would want your sister to marry one.


Navy Snapshot:

Aviators are part of the Navy, but so are Black shoes (surface warfare) and
bubble heads (submariners). Furthermore, the Navy is split into two distinctly
different Fleets (West and East Coast). The Navy is heterogeneous and micro.
Your squadron is your home; it may be great, average, or awful. A squadron can
go from one extreme to the other before you know it. You will spend months
preparing for cruise and months on cruise. The quality of the aircraft varies
directly with the availability of parts. Senior Navy enlisted are salt of the
earth; you'll be proud if you earn their respect. Junior enlisted vary from
terrific to the troubled kid the judge made join the service. You will be given
the opportunity to lead these people during your career; you will be humbled and
get your hands dirty. The quality of your training will vary and sometimes you
will be over your head. You will miss many important family events. There will
be long stretches of tedious duty aboard ship. You will fly in very bad weather
and/or at night and you will be scared many times. You will fly with legends in
the Navy and they will kick your ass until you become a lethal force.

And some days - when the scheduling Gods have smiled upon you - your jet will
catapult into a glorious morning over a far-away sea and you will be drop-jawed
that someone would pay you to do it. The hottest girl in the bar wants to meet
the Naval Aviator. That bar is in Singapore. Bottom line, son, if you gotta
ask...pack warm & good luck in Colorado.

Banzai

PS Air Force pilots wear scarves and iron their flight suits.

Link Posted: 4/7/2006 1:05:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Johnny_Reno:
members.cox.net/jollyrogers/helo%20pilots%20rule.jpg


Well, two out of the three look cool.



Think so? I never cared for the tri-colors myself...
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 1:07:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 53vortec:

Originally Posted By Johnny_Reno:
members.cox.net/jollyrogers/helo%20pilots%20rule.jpg


Well, two out of the three look cool.



Think so? I never cared for the tri-colors myself...



The redhead was absolutely unbelievable.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 1:07:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By H46Driver:
Not exactly what the poster was asking, but I'll throw it in. The letter is from a USN fighter pilot who spend 3 years on an exchange tour flying F-15s with the USAF. Granted, in the days of AEFs the comments about time away from home may be slightly OBE but... The letter was in response to a young man (a prospective pilot) asking which service academy he should attend. Hope you enjoy.


Young Man,

Congratulations on your selection to both the Naval and Air Force Academies.
Your goal of becoming a fighter pilot is impressive and a fine way to serve your
country. As you requested, I'd be happy to share some insight into which service
would be the best choice. Each service has a distinctly different culture. You
need to ask yourself "Which one am I more likely to thrive in?"

USAF Snapshot:

The USAF is exceptionally well organized and well run. Their training programs
are terrific. All pilots are groomed to meet high standards for knowledge and
professionalism. Their aircraft are top- notch and extremely well maintained.
Their facilities are excellent. Their enlisted personnel are the brightest and
the best trained. The USAF is homogenous and macro. No matter where you go,
you'll know what to expect, what is expected of you, and you'll be given the
training & tools you need to meet those expectations. You will never be put in a
situation over your head. Over a 20-year career, you will be home for most
important Family events. Your Mom would want you to be an Air Force pilot...so
would your wife. Your Dad would want your sister to marry one.


Navy Snapshot:

Aviators are part of the Navy, but so are Black shoes (surface warfare) and
bubble heads (submariners). Furthermore, the Navy is split into two distinctly
different Fleets (West and East Coast). The Navy is heterogeneous and micro.
Your squadron is your home; it may be great, average, or awful. A squadron can
go from one extreme to the other before you know it. You will spend months
preparing for cruise and months on cruise. The quality of the aircraft varies
directly with the availability of parts. Senior Navy enlisted are salt of the
earth; you'll be proud if you earn their respect. Junior enlisted vary from
terrific to the troubled kid the judge made join the service. You will be given
the opportunity to lead these people during your career; you will be humbled and
get your hands dirty. The quality of your training will vary and sometimes you
will be over your head. You will miss many important family events. There will
be long stretches of tedious duty aboard ship. You will fly in very bad weather
and/or at night and you will be scared many times. You will fly with legends in
the Navy and they will kick your ass until you become a lethal force.

And some days - when the scheduling Gods have smiled upon you - your jet will
catapult into a glorious morning over a far-away sea and you will be drop-jawed
that someone would pay you to do it. The hottest girl in the bar wants to meet
the Naval Aviator. That bar is in Singapore. Bottom line, son, if you gotta
ask...pack warm & good luck in Colorado.

Banzai

PS Air Force pilots wear scarves and iron their flight suits.



Reading that would make me want to go into the Navy. The USAF sounds boring in that write up.

With a screwed up mentality like that, it's a wonder I'm not a nuke.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 1:07:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2006 1:08:36 PM EDT by ZitiForBreakfast]
We always knew when the 18's were on the VAL, the motors sounded like Mac trucks doing about 200 MPH down the highway when they were turnin' up.

Only had Pedro at NKT and what ever NADEP 46's were there being fixed.

When I was in Lejeune before my lat move, would love to get the fast movers from Beufort, it was a nice change from the Carolina Lawn Darts. Spent way to much time on 46's....4 floats and work ups and whatever....

Never had a mishap, so I am grateful of the 46 Driver's and the Crew Cheifs...One of my old XO's was a 46 pilot, he was a crazy SOB.

When I was at II SRIG we had an Captain that was a 18 driver...dude was always too cool for school, but a good man and a good leader.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 1:24:47 PM EDT
bump..this should be interesting.

I think 'flynavy' might know a thing or two as well
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 1:37:31 PM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 1:45:13 PM EDT
Sorry Paratroopers look better with hot chicks






Originally Posted By H46Driver:

Originally Posted By dport:

Originally Posted By H46Driver:
I think that there has to be at least 1 hour in the morning and 1 in the evening set aside for "do I look cool" checks. Beyond that I'm not too sure.


My understanding is it's two hours a day for jets, 1.5 hours for fixed wing and 1 hour for helo pilots.



Helo pilot "look cool" checks? Oh that's right, you're used to LAMPS guys so I believe it.

I only do the "look cool" check when flying cheerleaders. Most of the time the results aren't so hot.

members.cox.net/jollyrogers/helo%20pilots%20rule.jpg


Link Posted: 4/7/2006 1:56:26 PM EDT
I'm not an Aviator. I'm USN Aircrew. I've known drivers on every platform in the USN, from P-3s to F-18's. Aint one of them that hates their job. Nothing in the world is as cool as Naval Aviation. Naval aviators are the best there is.. Period. What is it like flying a Hornet. Well never been in one during flight but I've gotten to fiddle around the cockpits of a couple and fly a real F-18 simulator a few times. Based on that experience I would have to say it's better than sex..

We're the Navy. Our heritage dates back 230 years and every bit of that is incorporated into our daily business from change of command to launching aircraft. Yeah we don't iron our flightsuits or wear scarfes. But Naval Aviation is recognized around the world. Fuck man they made the movie about Navy fighter pilots!

Next time you go to an airshow to see the Blues call the base PAO and inquire about getting a tour and maybe seeing the planes up close and personal.. That letter above is right on the money.. Espescially the part about the chics in Singapore, or any other part of the world for that matter..



Oh, we dont iron our flight suits since they are considered organizational equipment and not really an authorized uniform for wear in public.. I think the USAF considers them a uniform like we do our working blues and summer whites.. I might be wrong though..

Link Posted: 4/7/2006 1:58:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2006 1:59:45 PM EDT by KA3B]

Originally Posted By Corey:

What's it like?



He spent 4 years in school, then another 2 years in the pipeline and finally gets to his squadron.
He is made the First LT Division Officer.
Life sucks.


How much stick time do you get?

However much time that the NATOPS says that a pilot will get in order to get qualified.
Unless it's the start of the new fiscal quarter, then he'll dump as much fuel as he uses when he flys.


Is most of it just flying pretty routine patterns?


Yes, touch and goes, missed approaches and wave-offs for mind numbing hours on end.
Boring holes in the sky.
DFW missions. (DFW = Dedicated Fuel Waste)


How much time in the seat do you get pushing the aircraft's performance envelope?


None now, not after he exceeded the G-Limits and made Airframes stay to do an over-G inspection on a Friday night.


What and the heck does it feel like to be up there in control of a jet like that?


Almost as good as sex, unless she's fat or ugly or both.


And last but not least, what is it like doing a carrier landing?


He let's oscar do the driving while I am reading the latest GQ magazine.

Do you ever get used to them, or is every one stressful?

Never get used to them, that's what he tells the chicks, chicks dig Navy guys.....
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 2:06:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2006 2:07:40 PM EDT by cmjohnson]
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 2:27:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2006 2:28:24 PM EDT by H46Driver]

Originally Posted By FREEFALLE7:
Sorry Paratroopers look better with hot chicks

pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL16/709417/1194623/135824939.jpg




So paratroopers can pose on the internet with women too?

JK - nice photo
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 2:32:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By H46Driver:

Originally Posted By FREEFALLE7:
Sorry Paratroopers look better with hot chicks

pic3.picturetrail.com/VOL16/709417/1194623/135824939.jpg




So paratroopers can pose on the internet with women too?

JK - nice photo


I have a photo of Brooke Shields and me on the Herc in Sig

I need to dig it up and scan it...I think the wife would burn it if she found it
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 2:37:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
The ground always comes up too fast in the final approach, even if you're doing it perfectly, by the book, and kiss the ground so gently that the only way you realize you've landed is because you can hear road noise. I've made landings like that and while it's a thrill to nail it perfectly like that, even THOSE times the ground seemed to approach awfully fast.



Flaring is for pussies
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 2:38:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Corey:
And last but not least, what is it like doing a carrier landing? Do you ever get used to them, or is every one stressful?



I have a whole 10 traps and cats under my belt, but it was flat out the coolest thing I've ever done in my entire life. It's violent, more violent than I imagined, but it's the greatest rush that I've experienced so far. I can't wait to do it again, this time in the Rhino.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 2:39:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Fly-Navy:

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
The ground always comes up too fast in the final approach, even if you're doing it perfectly, by the book, and kiss the ground so gently that the only way you realize you've landed is because you can hear road noise. I've made landings like that and while it's a thrill to nail it perfectly like that, even THOSE times the ground seemed to approach awfully fast.



Flaring is for pussies



So is using a cable or brakes to stop.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 2:39:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By H46Driver:

Originally Posted By Fly-Navy:

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
The ground always comes up too fast in the final approach, even if you're doing it perfectly, by the book, and kiss the ground so gently that the only way you realize you've landed is because you can hear road noise. I've made landings like that and while it's a thrill to nail it perfectly like that, even THOSE times the ground seemed to approach awfully fast.



Flaring is for pussies



So is using a cable or brakes to stop.



Link Posted: 4/7/2006 2:51:38 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 4:05:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Corey:
What's it like?



Better than (most) sex!


How much stick time do you get?


About 6-10 hours a week.


Is most of it just flying pretty routine patterns?


It's lots and lots of practice of various tactical skills (BFM, bombing, formation, long range A/A intercepts, that sort of thing) and mundane admin skills (practice for landing at the boat, administrative formation). It's all fun.


How much time in the seat do you get pushing the aircraft's performance envelope?


About 3/4 of the flying is tactical.


What and the heck does it feel like to be up there in control of a jet like that?


At times like I am hanging on by the stabs (stabilators), other times, it feels like I am the shiznit.


And last but not least, what is it like doing a carrier landing?


I'm pretty new at it, so they're all rather... interesting...


Do you ever get used to them, or is every one stressful?


Everyone gets used to the day ones on calm seas. The night or pitching deck landings are a bit more stressful.

There is a saying. The three best things in life are: a good orgasm, a good landing and a good bowel movement. A night carrier trap is an opportunity to experience all three at once.


Nothing classified, but I'm just sure that we've all dreamed about what it was like as a combat pilot.


I keep classafied stuff off of boards - that's why a lot of my answers are generic.


I see the F16's doing take off and landing patterns over Madison and wonder if that ever gets boring.


It can get routine, and then the pilot can get complacent, and then boring goes to interesting real fast.


Then a few days later I see a group of them tear off over the horizon trying to catch the lead jet and wonder if boring could ever be a word applied to these machines.


Nope.
Matt
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 4:17:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Fly-Navy:

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
The ground always comes up too fast in the final approach, even if you're doing it perfectly, by the book, and kiss the ground so gently that the only way you realize you've landed is because you can hear road noise. I've made landings like that and while it's a thrill to nail it perfectly like that, even THOSE times the ground seemed to approach awfully fast.



Flaring is for pussies



flaring to land is like squatting to pee...
Matt
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 4:25:24 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 4:30:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dport:
Reading that would make me want to go into the Navy. The USAF sounds boring in that write up.

With a screwed up mentality like that, it's a wonder I'm not a nuke.



What? and miss out on the 3 am startups, ORSE, endless paperwork, monthly exams, sitting at a panel for six hours or more at a stretch while shut down, riggin shore power while the coners go on liberty, AND field day?

Dude, you missed out.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 4:31:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PromptCritical:

Originally Posted By dport:
Reading that would make me want to go into the Navy. The USAF sounds boring in that write up.

With a screwed up mentality like that, it's a wonder I'm not a nuke.



What? and miss out on the 3 am startups, ORSE, endless paperwork, monthly exams, sitting at a panel for six hours or more at a stretch while shut down, riggin shore power while the coners go on liberty, AND field day?

Dude, you missed out.


That's what I'm thinking. I don't abuse myself enough.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 4:36:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2006 4:37:34 PM EDT by PromptCritical]

Originally Posted By dport:

Originally Posted By PromptCritical:

Originally Posted By dport:
Reading that would make me want to go into the Navy. The USAF sounds boring in that write up.

With a screwed up mentality like that, it's a wonder I'm not a nuke.



What? and miss out on the 3 am startups, ORSE, endless paperwork, monthly exams, sitting at a panel for six hours or more at a stretch while shut down, riggin shore power while the coners go on liberty, AND field day?

Dude, you missed out.


That's what I'm thinking. I don't abuse myself enough.



Hey, it wasn't that bad, I did it for four years (plus 2 in training), might have done more, but I was pretty dissillusioned at the end and I wanted more money. Oh well, the $60K college fund is good.


There is a saying. The three best things in life are: a good orgasm, a good landing and a good bowel movement. A night carrier trap is an opportunity to experience all three at once.



Link Posted: 4/7/2006 4:55:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By valheru21:

How much time in the seat do you get pushing the aircraft's performance envelope?


About 3/4 of the flying is tactical.
Matt


I like to here that!
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 5:01:18 PM EDT
I fly on hilos alot going offshore to different rigs and comming back to shore. Below are some of the chops I flew on.

S92

S76

H92

Bell 206

Bell430

Bell210


Link Posted: 4/7/2006 6:42:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2006 6:47:35 PM EDT by TIMMAH]
6-10 hours a week, wow. That is great news. I was worried that training time would be less.


What are your thoughts on the Super Hornet itself?


Link Posted: 4/7/2006 8:31:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TIMMAH: What are your thoughts on the Super Hornet itself?
He doesn't want to tell you the truth man. The Super Bug flies itself. All he has to do is stay away for all the planning/briefing/debriefing sessions, which are at least twice as long as the actual mission.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 8:43:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2006 8:46:46 PM EDT by CFII]
I wish I flew a fighter. Its in my blood and I will never be able to even try.

O well. At least I'm flying the 182RG tmw.
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 6:57:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TIMMAH:
6-10 hours a week, wow. That is great news. I was worried that training time would be less.


What are your thoughts on the Super Hornet itself?





I think it's a kick-ass strike fighter perfectly suited for the missions currently facing the Navy. It's a lot of fun to fly. Tax-dollars well spent.
Matt
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