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Posted: 8/4/2009 5:58:09 PM EST
OMG. This thing is amazing. I picked up a 12" skillet (pre-seasoned)at walmart this weekend and just fried up 2/3 a lb of bacon. Not only did it heat up pretty quick, but after it got hot, I turned the burner down to low and was able to fry up more bacon in a matter of a few minutes since it retained heat so well.
The only down side to the heat retention is it took a while to cool down enough for me to rinse it out and wipe it off (no I didn't use soap or scrub it).

I can't wait to use it some more and see how the seasoning develops (good thing I still have a lb and a third of bacon). The one from the factory was probably an ok start, but my bacon stuck to it a little. But after one batch of bacon, I can already tell its improving.

Link Posted: 8/4/2009 6:00:54 PM EST
UPS just delivered one just like that to me from Amazon today.

Under $20 delivered. I'm pretty sure that Amazon lost their ass in shipping on this order.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 6:03:00 PM EST
Pics or BS


Link Posted: 8/4/2009 6:04:45 PM EST
Your parents are supposed to give you a skillet when you move out. Mais, everybody know dat cher.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 6:05:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 6:05:57 PM EST by Nlinc]
Originally Posted By Pangea:
Your parents are supposed to give you a skillet when you move out. Mais, everybody know dat cher.


I was gypped! They don't even have any cast iron as far as I know... Hmm I know what to get as gifts now.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 6:55:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 6:58:51 PM EST by wildearp]
Used, antique cast iron blows away the Lodge stuff. The Lodge is too rough and too thick. Get ahold of vintage Wagner or Griswold and you will see the light. They are in every antique store around here and at very good prices.

I have seasoned the new stuff. It helps to hit the bottom with an orbital sander to smooth it out prior to seasoning. The pre-seasoned ones are not done correctly, IHMO.

If you can cook eggs over easy in your cast iron without any sticking, it is correctly seasoned.............
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 6:57:30 PM EST
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Used, antique cast iron blows away the Lodge stuff. The Lodge is too rough and too thick. Get ahold of a Wagner or Griswold and you will see the light. They are in every antique store around here and at very good prices.

I have seasoned the new stuff. It helps to hit the bottom with an orbital sander to smooth it out prior to seasoning. The pre-seasoned ones are not done correctly, IHMO.

If you can cook eggs over easy in your cast iron without any sticking, it is correctly seasoned.............


Thanks for the tip. If it doesn't smooth out soon, I may smooth it out and re-season it in the oven. I really only bought the skillet for frying bacon and some other fried meat dishes I make. Not so much as a general daily use pan.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:01:55 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 7:03:50 PM EST by wildearp]
Cast iron is hard. I started with 50 grit and finished with 220. Hit it with a light coat of cooking oil and bake it for 45 minutes in a 350 degree oven. TAke it out, oil it again and then put it in the oven for 30 more minutes.

What I have found is best to get the seasoning going right is to cook fresh hash browns.

As much as I hate ebays anti gun stance, sometimes it is the best place to shop for antiques. There are tons of vintage iron at reasonable prices. Try it out and you will dump that lodge like a.....................hot skillet.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:07:20 PM EST
I just finish making fried chicken for dinner in my Lodge 12" frying pan. The problem is that the frying pan didn't include a lid, I had to take it from my Lodge Dutch oven. Cooking without a lid, wastes about 25% of the heat.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:08:21 PM EST
My cast iron pot is used to melt down Wheel weights into lead ingots, that I use to make boolits to shoot for pennies.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:15:29 PM EST
had my cast iron skillet for 15 months now since i moved out of my brothers house. pretty much the only pan i cook with, unless im cooking a bunch and need more than one item going at a time.


tasty cast iron goodness.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:22:59 PM EST


I thought this was about one of my favorite bands (they've broke up now)

I'm disappointed
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:24:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 7:26:30 PM EST by PAPPYO]
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Used, antique cast iron blows away the Lodge stuff. The Lodge is too rough and too thick. Get ahold of vintage Wagner or Griswold and you will see the light. They are in every antique store around here and at very good prices.

I have seasoned the new stuff. It helps to hit the bottom with an orbital sander to smooth it out prior to seasoning. The pre-seasoned ones are not done correctly, IHMO.

If you can cook eggs over easy in your cast iron without any sticking, it is correctly seasoned.............


you know you can polish them up with 320 grit then season them. Slick as teflon then I also started with 80 grit and a DA air sander, finished 320.

Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:25:19 PM EST
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Cast iron is hard. I started with 50 grit and finished with 220. Hit it with a light coat of cooking oil and bake it for 45 minutes in a 350 degree oven. TAke it out, oil it again and then put it in the oven for 30 more minutes.

What I have found is best to get the seasoning going right is to cook fresh hash browns.

As much as I hate ebays anti gun stance, sometimes it is the best place to shop for antiques. There are tons of vintage iron at reasonable prices. Try it out and you will dump that lodge like a.....................hot skillet.


Check out the way this eBay seller answers a question:

http://cgi.ebay.com/12-WAGNER-WARE-SKILLET-Has-Polished-Milling-rings-exc_W0QQitemZ160352582977QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item2555c23d41&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:32:29 PM EST
Fry things in it to season it, like bacon. If it is deep enough to fry food in, use it for that, too. My cast iron skillets and pots just roll water off of them. It's the ultimate non-stick!
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:33:32 PM EST
I actually found a lodge 12" cast iron skillet in one of the dumpsters here this week (it's move out week in a college town...all sorts of perfectly good stuff being thrown out, but that's another thread).

Brought it home, cleaned and sanded it out and reseasoned it in the oven with vegetable oil and gave it to the better half since I already had one of this size and she's seen how awesome cooking on cast iron is by watching me cook with it.

I told her to cook a ton of bacon in it. That really helps the seasoning.

One thing I've noticed is that if you have a shitty electric range like I do, cooking with cast iron helps regulate the heat better because it retains heat.

Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:54:09 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 7:55:44 PM EST by wildearp]
Originally Posted By PAPPYO:
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Used, antique cast iron blows away the Lodge stuff. The Lodge is too rough and too thick. Get ahold of vintage Wagner or Griswold and you will see the light. They are in every antique store around here and at very good prices.

I have seasoned the new stuff. It helps to hit the bottom with an orbital sander to smooth it out prior to seasoning. The pre-seasoned ones are not done correctly, IHMO.

If you can cook eggs over easy in your cast iron without any sticking, it is correctly seasoned.............


you know you can polish them up with 320 grit then season them. Slick as teflon then I also started with 80 grit and a DA air sander, finished 320.



The Lodge and the new production Wagner are still too thick. They take longer to heat up and are a bit harder to control temperature. Yes, I use a DA, either electric or air. Starting with 320 takes too long. You don't want it too shiny or the seasoning will not stick. 220 grit is fine enough for final finish before seasoning.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:55:58 PM EST
I want their large griddle.

Good stuff.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:58:21 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:09:50 PM EST
Originally Posted By Barrelburner:
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Cast iron is hard. I started with 50 grit and finished with 220. Hit it with a light coat of cooking oil and bake it for 45 minutes in a 350 degree oven. TAke it out, oil it again and then put it in the oven for 30 more minutes.

What I have found is best to get the seasoning going right is to cook fresh hash browns.

As much as I hate ebays anti gun stance, sometimes it is the best place to shop for antiques. There are tons of vintage iron at reasonable prices. Try it out and you will dump that lodge like a.....................hot skillet.


Check out the way this eBay seller answers a question:

http://cgi.ebay.com/12-WAGNER-WARE-SKILLET-Has-Polished-Milling-rings-exc_W0QQitemZ160352582977QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item2555c23d41&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14



Questions from other members

Q: is this skillet seasoned––or is it sanded down?

A: I CLEANED IT, NO IT HASN'T BEEN SANDED DOWN STUPID, YOU DON'T GET MILLING MARKS FROM SANDING. DON'T bid you Jerk . in an office your stupid.
Jul 31, 2009

Ask the seller a question See all questions and answers



Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:38:26 PM EST
Questions from other members

Q: is this skillet seasoned––or is it sanded down?

A: I CLEANED IT, NO IT HASN'T BEEN SANDED DOWN STUPID, YOU DON'T GET MILLING MARKS FROM SANDING. DON'T bid you Jerk . in an office your stupid.
Jul 31, 2009

Ask the seller a question See all questions and answers


the seller must be a member here.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:44:45 PM EST
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Originally Posted By PAPPYO:
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Used, antique cast iron blows away the Lodge stuff. The Lodge is too rough and too thick. Get ahold of vintage Wagner or Griswold and you will see the light. They are in every antique store around here and at very good prices.

I have seasoned the new stuff. It helps to hit the bottom with an orbital sander to smooth it out prior to seasoning. The pre-seasoned ones are not done correctly, IHMO.

If you can cook eggs over easy in your cast iron without any sticking, it is correctly seasoned.............


you know you can polish them up with 320 grit then season them. Slick as teflon then I also started with 80 grit and a DA air sander, finished 320.



The Lodge and the new production Wagner are still too thick. They take longer to heat up and are a bit harder to control temperature. Yes, I use a DA, either electric or air. Starting with 320 takes too long. You don't want it too shiny or the seasoning will not stick. 220 grit is fine enough for final finish before seasoning.


mine worked out great, 5" sticky paper, 80,150,320. I'll be dead and these skillets will still live

Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:32:47 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 9:38:02 PM EST by Brassoe]
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Used, antique cast iron blows away the Lodge stuff. The Lodge is too rough and too thick. Get ahold of vintage Wagner or Griswold and you will see the light. They are in every antique store around here and at very good prices.

I have seasoned the new stuff. It helps to hit the bottom with an orbital sander to smooth it out prior to seasoning. The pre-seasoned ones are not done correctly, IHMO.

If you can cook eggs over easy in your cast iron without any sticking, it is correctly seasoned.............


THIS. While some of the old antiques are pricey because of collectibility(is that a word?), the more common stuff sometimes goes the same or even less than new stuff. My Mom has probably a good dozen bought in the last 2 years
and I would bet the average price was less than $40 shipped.

Also, I have noticed in general, that the older the cast iron as you go back to about 1900, gets less porous. I'm sure the product makes a difference, but I am referencing my time as a machinist for a John Deere contractor doing the wheel hubs.
Without gloves, those damn things would chew your hands more than a rabid dog.

ETA: not trying to look like an idiot. Just unsure how to word that last paragraph and i'm tired
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:45:37 PM EST
mmmmmm cast iron....original non stick cookwear! I love my skillet and dutch ovens!

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