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Posted: 1/6/2012 7:38:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/6/2012 11:41:32 PM EDT by USP45Tim]
I have none. Teach me your ways.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 7:40:53 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 7:46:09 PM EDT
I asked for tips last week and some people advised the USAA car buying program. It's good for getting the car at, or very near invoice. The dealerships which honor the USAA pricing generally honor other internet pricing as well. I was treated well at all the dealerships and I like the way it removes a lot of the adversarial aspect of the negotiations. Truecar has good info, and I was told that USAA uses Truecar data.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 7:50:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/6/2012 8:02:02 PM EDT by LarryLove]
I throw money at them till they give me the car.

Just kidding. I just bought a 2012 Jeep Wrangler. Found a large local dealership with an Internet sales department. Got it for 4% under invoice with no negotiating. According to the Jeep discussion forums, 2% under invoice is a pretty good deal for these vehicles, so I did no negotiation and got a really great deal. I think my dealer treated the internet pricing as a take-it-or-leave-it deal for the serious buyer. Leave obviously good deals out there for all to see, and let the serious buyers pick them up with a minimal amount of selling effort on the dealer's part.

In my search, I used truecar.com to evaluate any vehicle I was interested in. I looked over several before I found my vehicle, but if any price was above average according to truecar, I didn't even consider it. The vehicle I finally found was so far below the truecar price, it didn't register on the scale. Using truecar and the info I gleaned from the discussion boards gave me the confidence to jump on a vehicle when the right deal presented itself. In fact, the dealer I used had lots of Jeeps at great prices. They sold one vehicle I was interested in, and then offered me an even better one for the same price!

I guess my advice is don't be desperate, bide your time, use truecar to evaluate your prices, and deal with the Internet sales department of your local dealers.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 7:56:14 PM EDT
Originally Posted By BillofRights:
I asked for tips last week and some people advised the USAA car buying program. It's good for getting the car at, or very near invoice. The dealerships which honor the USAA pricing generally honor other internet pricing as well. I was treated well at all the dealerships and I like the way it removes a lot of the adversarial aspect of the negotiations. Truecar has good info, and I was told that USAA uses Truecar data.


I bought my last two vehicles through USAA, it's painless.

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 7:56:55 PM EDT
Bring a gun.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 8:05:02 PM EDT
This book will help out a lot: Secrets of Power Negotiating

It's a good idea to have a general understanding of negotiations so the other guy doesn't bother you and you can still get what you want.

It's a mindset, and it's also a lost art in the US.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 8:05:44 PM EDT
Be willing to miss a"deal"
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 8:07:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1cheapshot:
Be willing to miss a"deal"

yes. You have to walk away from a few guys too. Don't worry, they'll call.


Link Posted: 1/6/2012 8:07:57 PM EDT
That's what I'm thinking. I'll tell them what I'm willing to offer and if they don't bite, I'm walking.

Originally Posted By JarheadPatriot:

Originally Posted By 1cheapshot:
Be willing to miss a"deal"

yes. You have to walk away from a few guys too. Don't worry, they'll call.




Link Posted: 1/6/2012 8:34:40 PM EDT
Being able to walk is a significant strength.

Never hand over the keys to your ride until the deal is set in stone.

If anyone tries anything after the price is agreed and a handshake is made (like when they pass you off to the financing department and make up bullshit "admin fees") walk immediately.

You can't hurt a car salesman's feelings, he doesn't have any. Not about you, anyway. You're just another $1000 commission sucka on the lot.

Negotiate from a position of strength. Know the invoice, holdbacks, and other promotions. Know the options, what you want and what you don't want. Make sure you can actually afford the car. Better if you can pay cash (but don't tell the guy it's a cash sale, or talk about trades until the price is written in stone). If asked what monthly payment, stick firm to your need to have a firm "out the door, no other extras" price. We can talk financing later.

If you are going to finance, know your options. If your credit sucks, it sucks to be you and you are at a disadvantage, especially if your bank won't finance you. If it's good, make sure you have all the options weighed before you meet "the finance guy".

Personally, if the guy does the "I need to talk to my manager" routine, I tell him he has 5 minutes, and then I'm walking. then I start a stopwatch. And I will walk. They always call back, or their internet sales guys do. I'll let them play their charade a little bit, but have other things to do rather than sit in uncomfortable silence because I know the shitbag probably has the speakerphone on, and is hoping my wife will say something he can use for leverage.

On that subject, if your wife isn't hard-nosed uber-bitch (mine's all soft and fluffy and emotional, and I kinda like 'em that way) tell her before you walk into the dealership to STFU. If she won't STFU, leave her at home. Seriously. Set expectations with her that you probably won't walk away with a new car today - and we know how hard women find it not to piss $300 on fucking useless shoes up the wall, so watch out when she wants a $50K SUV and whines that paying for all the options she doesn't need, or want, because it's "blue" is OK and it's only an extra $40 a month, or some "nominal" (in her mind) amount of cash.

That's all I got. I recognize that everyone needs to make money, so I don't want to fuck anyone, but I know the dealer won't let himself be fucked, so I can be a nasty, miserable, old cunt. I don't "need" a new car. I don't really "want" a new car, and once I've nailed you down on price, I'm going to fuck your finance guy in the ass by writing a check anyway.

Alternatively the USAA or Costco programs will hook you up with the fleet or internet sales departments and you'll simply pay an agreed $x over invoice no matter what you spec, and you're out the door, save for the finance and trade.

Dave Ramsey probably wouldn't like my potty mouth, but he got me to a reasonable position of financial strength. Every so often it's nice to be reminded where you are.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:07:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/6/2012 11:13:10 PM EDT by BossMaverick]
Here is what I did the last time I bought a used vehicle and it ended up working pretty good for me.

I did my research and found a make/model I wanted. Using the internet, I determined what a good price would be and then search for vehicles that were for sale. Look for internet sales pricing. Print off the top 5 vehicles that you want to look at. I determined my top 5 by things like options, mileage, condition according to pictures, price, etc... I also printed off several more as a backup plan and for bargaining ammunition. Make sure you go to multiple dealerships (this is key). Go look at the vehicles starting at your first pick to the last pick. Look at ALL OF THEM and then some. The dealers don't want you walking away and will try to sell you what they have NOW. Don't give in early, instead leave to go look at the next vehicle at the next dealer. Create the appearance that you are a knowledgeable shopper because you will be one if you do all these things. After looking at all 5+, you will know which is the best vehicle for the best price at the best dealer. You will learn which dealers use over the top sales tactics and which ones are low stress. DON'T BE AFRAID TO PASS UP A VEHICLE, even if you think it is "the one".

During your quest, a salesperson may peak your interest in a model you haven't researched. Because you haven't researched that model, you won't know what a good price is or isn't. The salesperson has won at that point if he talks you into the sale. Example: The price is marked at $15,000, you talk him down to $12,000 and think you got a good deal, actual bluebook value is $9,000 so you still overpaid at $12,000. If you do get interested in another model during quest, go home and research it. If that model turns out to be more of what you want, start over and pick 5+ of those that you want to see in person. The key here is to be a knowledgeable shopper and let the salesperson see that. Likewise, if you have no idea which vehicle you want from the start, go to dealerships to look at and test drive models you think you might like. After determining the model you do want, go home and do your research. Don't go completely off of the salesperson. The research and time spent traveling to various dealers pays off in the end (along with having PATIENCE).

Keep in mind that in today's market that it is a complete sellers market for used vehicles. It will be more challenging to get a good deal. In some cases, a brand new vehicle could be a better deal then a used one when you consider the warranty, low financing rates, current rebates, the current depreciation rates, and the added maintenance costs of a used vehicle (it may need new tires, brakes, fluid changes, etc).

ETA: For some reason I thought you were asking about used car buying tactics so most of this relates to that. Research still pays off for a new vehicle sale.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:58:09 PM EDT
Originally Posted By seven-six-two:

On that subject, if your wife isn't hard-nosed uber-bitch (mine's all soft and fluffy and emotional, and I kinda like 'em that way) tell her before you walk into the dealership to STFU. If she won't STFU, leave her at home. Seriously. Set expectations with her that you probably won't walk away with a new car today - and we know how hard women find it not to piss $300 on fucking useless shoes up the wall, so watch out when she wants a $50K SUV and whines that paying for all the options she doesn't need, or want, because it's "blue" is OK and it's only an extra $40 a month, or some "nominal" (in her mind) amount of cash.


+1

Tell your wife to keep a poker face while car shopping. Go in private to quietly discuss each others feelings about a car. Do NOT discuss anything in front of salesperson.

Also, I forgot to mention, if you think you are getting an awesome deal from the beginning, still work on getting a better deal. Example: Last year I bought a brand new "leftover" motorcycle that had been at a dealer for almost two years. It was the year and model I was looking for and was already at an unbelievable low price. I would've gladly bought it at the advertised price but I was able to get it for even lower without even trying hard.

Finally, I hate it when dealers ask how much I want to spend a month for a car payment. That leaves the door wide open for them to convince you of longer finance terms, talking you into "only" $50 more a month, etc... You should have already done your homework to know what the monthly payment should be for current interest rates. Talk in terms of total dollars.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 12:08:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By USP45Tim:
That's what I'm thinking. I'll tell them what I'm willing to offer and if they don't bite, I'm walking.

Originally Posted By JarheadPatriot:

Originally Posted By 1cheapshot:
Be willing to miss a"deal"

yes. You have to walk away from a few guys too. Don't worry, they'll call.




do this a few times and one of them will say yes.

Link Posted: 1/7/2012 12:17:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By USP45Tim:
I have none. Teach me your ways.


You need to take the Reid Interogation Techniques course. Then you will know will the sleazeball if lying to you
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 12:25:22 AM EDT
Only TWO scenarios are possible when you leave a dealership with an automobile..........You either paid a fair price or you paid too much.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 12:33:53 AM EDT
Usually they give you a higher price than what they (the actual dealer) listed on the internet through sites like autotrader. That's a start.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 1:40:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2012 1:41:49 AM EDT by Jason280]
Only TWO scenarios are possible when you leave a dealership with an automobile..........You either paid a fair price or you paid too much.


This bears repeating.

The best advice I can give, always be willing to walk away from a deal, and never be desperate. Buy on your terms, or don't buy at all. And whatever you do, don't let emotions get involved.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 4:16:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2012 5:23:55 AM EDT by rod727]
Regardless of whether you like it or not the seller always controls the transaction....these guys do this for a living and you better respect that, you don't have to like it just understand this is their sandbox and if they have been doing it for more than a month or two they have figured out the emotions of the sale....a lot of guys that think they are savvy buyers should look in the rear view mirror while they are driving off the lot as there is a good chance it is "high fives" all around.....understand it is his product he has the advantage of cost knowledge especially sunk cost on used vehicles...that being said you have the advantage of being the decision maker on the transaction so there is a natural balance.....now the dealerships will try to tilt that balance in their favor immediately....

1. Always negotiate cash price....what you can afford monthly is none of their business....its your business but the showroom floor is no place to be setting your monthly household budget for the car
2. Arrange bank/credit union financing in advance....even if you don't use it understand what rates are and have them in your pocket....if it makes you feel better have bank run a few scenarios (example)
a. $25,000 10% down 60 mos = x
b. $20,000 15% down 48 mos = y
etc...etc.... the goal is to understand what you can afford
3. Do your homework and understand what the vehicle bluebook numbers are etc..
4. If at all possible do not cloud the deal with a trade
5. They don't need your drivers license....they don want you walking out
6. expect a shit ton of add on crap that you may or may not want (uhh yeah I want that car but not the interior sealer, but sir its already on it, I don't care I want the car not the sealer) you get it..
7. have fun....
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 1:06:43 PM EDT
Try buying a car October-December. You stand a great chance to score a great deal on a current year model car in advance of the next year's release. Your chances are even better if there's a body style change in the particular model. Also, pay attention to registration/inspection stickers to get an idea of how long the vehicle has been on the lot. The longer it's been on the lot, the more you have to negotiate with in terms of convincing the dealership to let the car go.

+1 Stick to your guns re: your desired price. Don't negotiate monthly payments, negotiate final price including TTL.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 1:08:00 PM EDT
Piss on him to assert your dominance.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 1:12:47 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 1:14:11 PM EDT
If the price is reasonable and it is what I want I'll buy it, if not I walk.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 1:27:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2012 1:27:27 PM EDT by SeanC]
double tap
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 6:02:51 PM EDT
1. Buy from a private seller. Used car dealers demand obscene profits - which means that you start your negotiations from a hopelessly disadvantaged position.

2. Have a good idea what the car is actually worth on the used marketplace (i.e., do your research).

3. Have the car checked out thoroughly by an independent mechanic before you commit to buying it. If the mechanic discovers any flaws, include the cost of fixing them in your negotiation.

4. Be reasonable. Nobody wants to get screwed.
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