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Posted: 6/27/2007 4:06:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/15/2007 9:40:02 AM EDT by rkbar15]
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070627/LOCAL0101/706270329/1015/LOCAL01]www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070627/LOCAL0101/706270329/1015/LOCAL01

Mayor withdraws from anti-gun coalition
Brainard cites confusion over national group's purpose
By Tania E. Lopez
June 27, 2007

Carmel Mayor Jim Brainard is one of about five mayors in the nation who recently withdrew from an anti-gun coalition headed by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
The nonpartisan coalition created last year includes more than 200 mayors nationwide. It was created to stem the flow of illegal guns into cities and to repeal federal legislation that restricts local police from accessing federal trace data to see where guns used for illegal purposes are purchased the most.

Brainard said he initially joined because he was told that the coalition's main goal was to "get guns out of the hands of convicted felons."

While Carmel has not had a surge in illegal gun shootings, police have taken a number of firearms during drug seizures every year, said Assistant Chief Tim Green.
"What we have done in the past is work with the ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives) because they have ways to track the guns. Nothing that is quick is easy, though," said Green.

Brainard said his resignation from the coalition had nothing to do with Bloomberg's recent announcement that he was leaving the Republican Party to become an independent.
"It had nothing to do with his (Bloomberg's) resignation. There's a lot of confusion on what the coalition was and was not doing," Brainard said Monday in a telephone interview.
Indiana has limited regulation of secondhand gun sales. In February, The Star reported that national advocacy groups in recent years have said Indiana's less-stringent gun-control laws make the state one of the most potent suppliers of guns used in crimes in other states.

"We respect Mayor Brainard's decision," said Bloomberg spokesman Jason Post. "But the number of members joining the coalition is overwhelming."
Brainard said he was a member of the coalition for about a year before resigning a couple of weeks ago.

"(Bloomberg's) change (in party) is indicative of how the coalition is changing its political stance. I like him but there was confusion about what this coalition was about," said Brainard.



Link Posted: 6/27/2007 8:33:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rkbar15:
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070627/LOCAL0101/706270329/1015/LOCAL01]www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070627/LOCAL0101/706270329/1015/LOCAL01

Mayor withdraws from anti-gun coalition
Brainard cites confusion over national group's purpose
By Tania E. Lopez
June 27, 2007

Carmel Mayor Jim Brainard is one of about five mayors in the nation who recently withdrew from an anti-gun coalition headed by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
The nonpartisan coalition created last year includes more than 200 mayors nationwide. It was created to stem the flow of illegal guns into cities and to repeal federal legislation that restricts local police from accessing federal trace data to see where guns used for illegal purposes are purchased the most.

Brainard said he initially joined because he was told that the coalition's main goal was to "get guns out of the hands of convicted felons."

While Carmel has not had a surge in illegal gun shootings, police have taken a number of firearms during drug seizures every year, said Assistant Chief Tim Green.
"What we have done in the past is work with the ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives) because they have ways to track the guns. Nothing that is quick is easy, though," said Green.

Brainard said his resignation from the coalition had nothing to do with Bloomberg's recent announcement that he was leaving the Republican Party to become an independent.
"It had nothing to do with his (Bloomberg's) resignation. There's a lot of confusion on what the coalition was and was not doing," Brainard said Monday in a telephone interview.
Indiana has limited regulation of secondhand gun sales. In February, The Star reported that national advocacy groups in recent years have said Indiana's less-stringent gun-control laws make the state one of the most potent suppliers of guns used in crimes in other states.
"We respect Mayor Brainard's decision," said Bloomberg spokesman Jason Post. "But the number of members joining the coalition is overwhelming."
Brainard said he was a member of the coalition for about a year before resigning a couple of weeks ago.

"(Bloomberg's) change (in party) is indicative of how the coalition is changing its political stance. I like him but there was confusion about what this coalition was about," said Brainard.


No matter what state you are in, the local gun control group says that your state is a supplier of crime guns and needs to have the laws tightened.

They said it about Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia, etc, you name it.
Link Posted: 6/27/2007 8:35:07 PM EDT
My Mayor backed out of the group.
He still sucks, but he did back out.
Link Posted: 8/15/2007 9:39:18 AM EDT
www.nraila.org/News/Read/NewsReleases.aspx?ID=9724

New Jersey Mayor Continues Trend: Leaves Bloomberg’s Anti-Gun Coalition

Monday, July 09, 2007

Fairfax, VA - Oldsmans Township, NJ Mayor Harry Moore has resigned his membership from New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s anti-gun coalition, continuing the trend of mayors jaded by Bloomberg’s focus on gun control rather than crime control.

“I applaud Mayor Harry Moore for having the courage to quit this anti-gun coalition once he recognized Mike Bloomberg true intentions,” said Chris W. Cox, National Rifle Association (NRA)’s chief lobbyist. “Mayors across the country have come to realize the coalition is nothing more than a front group for gun control.”

Bloomberg’s anti-gun coalition opposes the Shelby-Tiahrt Amendment in Congress that is supported by rank-and-file law enforcement across the country. The National Fraternal Order of Police, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and the U.S. Department of Justice and NRA are united in wanting to keep trace information in the hands of law enforcement. These law enforcement organizations have expressed concern that giving this information to politicians will compromise on-going investigations and endanger the safety of law enforcement officers.

"Mayor Bloomberg has wasted taxpayer money jet-setting across the country, holding media events and spreading a load of propaganda to other mayors," Cox continued. " Bloomberg’s own actions prove that protecting law enforcement officers is not at the top of his agenda."
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