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Posted: 12/14/2016 8:53:37 AM EST
I have a 2017 3/4 Ton Chevy Express Van.
Factory tire pressure is supposed to be 50 PSI Front, 80 PSI Rear.
All four tires are the same, and are rated for 80 PSI maximum.

95% of my trips are unloaded, carrying just me to work or around town.
This winter I will not be towing anything or loaded with anything heavy.
The family will ride in the van infrequently. Less than 1000 pounds total.

I reduced the rear tire pressure to 50. The ride is better. The traction in the snow is much better. The dash is lit up with TPMS warnings.

Anyone else with similar equipment running reduced pressure in rear tires when unloaded?
Any downside to this as long as I am aware of and reinflate when loaded?

Link Posted: 12/14/2016 9:12:12 AM EST
I run mine around max psi, but am towing and/ or hauling 90% of the time.
Probably not what you are concerned with, but you can always pull the TPMS sensors and replace with regular valve stems. There are more than a few ways to keep the sensors pressurized i.e. a capped piece of pvc with a valve, or in a small spare tire and wheelset capable of safely holding the needed pressure. Keep it in your vehicle and run whatever pressure you feel necessary in your tires with no dash lights on.
Just a thought.
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 10:16:16 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By -Kyuss-:
I run mine around max psi, but am towing and/ or hauling 90% of the time.
Probably not what you are concerned with, but you can always pull the TPMS sensors and replace with regular valve stems. There are more than a few ways to keep the sensors pressurized i.e. a capped piece of pvc with a valve, or in a small spare tire and wheelset capable of safely holding the needed pressure. Keep it in your vehicle and run whatever pressure you feel necessary in your tires with no dash lights on.
Just a thought.
View Quote


Most wheel sensors need to see rotational movement, or they will throw a light also.



Luckily with my dually, I don't have that nanny crap. My fronts are set at 70 and the rears at 50.

OP, you will be just fine running lower pressures. Running empty, there's more weight over the front tires, and if they are doing just fine at 50....then I bet the rears will do just fine at 45-50.
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 10:30:07 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ATC:


Most wheel sensors need to see rotational movement, or they will throw a light also.



Luckily with my dually, I don't have that nanny crap. My fronts are set at 70 and the rears at 50.

OP, you will be just fine running lower pressures. Running empty, there's more weight over the front tires, and if they are doing just fine at 50....then I bet the rears will do just fine at 45-50.
View Quote



Thanks, that was my thought. I can ignore the blinking lights.
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 11:29:28 AM EST
Take the maximum tire pressure of the tire and divide that by the maximum weight that the tire is rated for.
You will get a 0.0XXXXX..... number.

Multiply that number by whatever pounds you putting on that tire.
Inflate tire to that answer.

Go to the truck stop and have each axle weighed. Cost should be less than $10.

Divide the axle weight by however many tires are on that axle.
Steering axle will have 2 tires, and so will your van's rear axle ( I assume ).

Dually trucks have 4 tires on the rear axle.
( I realize you probably know this, but... )
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 12:20:28 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/14/2016 12:22:13 PM EST by TXHillCountry]
You can get TPMS reset. I ran lower pressure for DD, and would increase for towing/hauling. I inflated based on contact patch. Range was 45-70PSI from DD -> pulling trailer. In the winter I ran 50-55 rear with 300-400 lbs in the back, summer was 45. E Rated 275-65R20s.
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 2:49:11 PM EST
What is tire width ?
 Vans have better ( even ) weight  distribution than a pickup.
 If running 265 width, I would  start at  about 38 or 40 PSI for  winter, and  local city  use.
 For high speed highway  or  high temperatures  you will need  50 PSI or more.
 If you have  narrower 235,  245 width,   I would bump up  a  couple  PSI on the minimum.

 If you live in a HOT climate, as in  texas or arizona, disregard anything I say....
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 3:07:22 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/14/2016 3:08:52 PM EST by Flatulence]
Hey OP - the formula I posted is designed to keep the maximum amount of rubber on the road so your tires wear evenly.

Over inflate, you burn the center.
Under inflate, and you burn the outer edges.

The formula eliminates all the guesswork.
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 3:55:12 PM EST
45 front, 50 rear is what I run my BFG Radial AT unloaded. The truck is still pretty stiff, but it is manageable. Anywhere close to max pressure with no load or trailer is not safe in my truck.
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 7:11:46 PM EST
If you drive 95% of the time empty, run 50 psi front and rear, just remember to air up the rear tires if carrying a heavy load. Have the dealer re configure the BCM or RCLR to have the TPMS light turn on at 45 psi on all 4 tires. You can quickly re configure the BCM with the factory scan tool the GDS/MDI.
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 8:00:01 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Fullpower:
What is tire width ?
 Vans have better ( even ) weight  distribution than a pickup.
 If running 265 width, I would  start at  about 38 or 40 PSI for  winter, and  local city  use.
 For high speed highway  or  high temperatures  you will need  50 PSI or more.
 If you have  narrower 235,  245 width,   I would bump up  a  couple  PSI on the minimum.

 If you live in a HOT climate, as in  texas or arizona, disregard anything I say....
View Quote



LT245/75R16. I'm at 50 psi front and back. It is 9 degrees outside currently.
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 8:00:59 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Flatulence:
Take the maximum tire pressure of the tire and divide that by the maximum weight that the tire is rated for.
You will get a 0.0XXXXX..... number.

Multiply that number by whatever pounds you putting on that tire.
Inflate tire to that answer.

Go to the truck stop and have each axle weighed. Cost should be less than $10.

Divide the axle weight by however many tires are on that axle.
Steering axle will have 2 tires, and so will your van's rear axle ( I assume ).

Dually trucks have 4 tires on the rear axle.
( I realize you probably know this, but... )
View Quote



Thanks for this and your second post. Will check axle weights.
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 8:02:14 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By wildearp:
45 front, 50 rear is what I run my BFG Radial AT unloaded. The truck is still pretty stiff, but it is manageable. Anywhere close to max pressure with no load or trailer is not safe in my truck.
View Quote



Good to hear someone else is doing this. The van is still stiff but the number of squeaks and rattles dropped way down with reduced tire pressure.
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 8:04:55 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DonofKalifornia:
If you drive 95% of the time empty, run 50 psi front and rear, just remember to air up the rear tires if carrying a heavy load. Have the dealer re configure the BCM or RCLR to have the TPMS light turn on at 45 psi on all 4 tires. You can quickly re configure the BCM with the factory scan tool the GDS/MDI.
View Quote



Good to hear. I'll ask when it's in next for one of the free oil changes.
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 8:05:40 PM EST
Thanks for the replies and suggestions everyone.
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 8:24:09 PM EST
My Ram 2500 demands 80#s in the rear.
Link Posted: 12/14/2016 9:27:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/14/2016 9:29:18 PM EST by Flatulence]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jchewie1:



Thanks for this and your second post. Will check axle weights.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jchewie1:
Originally Posted By Flatulence:
Take the maximum tire pressure of the tire and divide that by the maximum weight that the tire is rated for.
You will get a 0.0XXXXX..... number.

Multiply that number by whatever pounds you putting on that tire.
Inflate tire to that answer.

Go to the truck stop and have each axle weighed. Cost should be less than $10.

Divide the axle weight by however many tires are on that axle.
Steering axle will have 2 tires, and so will your van's rear axle ( I assume ).

Dually trucks have 4 tires on the rear axle.
( I realize you probably know this, but... )



Thanks for this and your second post. Will check axle weights.

You are quite welcome.

For 10 years I carried the largest truck camper made in the back of my SRW 1 Ton pick up.
SRW = Single Rear Wheel
DRW = Dual Rear Wheel

The weakest link, as far as safety was concerned, was the tires.
I beefed up the suspension with 5K pound air bags under the rear axle. This gave the truck the ability to ride level instead of having the front axle - and lights - lifted up.

Can you imagine how this lighter weight would effect night driving and slippery conditions ?

I put 19.5" wheels on the truck and the tires are load rated 'H' and have a max weight limit of 4800lbs. Per Wheel !
I got 100k miles from those tires because I paid attention to the correct tire pressures.
Link Posted: 12/15/2016 9:55:46 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Banditman:
My Ram 2500 demands 80#s in the rear.
View Quote


You can set it to any pressure:

http://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/2013-general-discussion/1670642-how-set-tpms-any-pressure.html
Link Posted: 12/16/2016 11:38:22 AM EST
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Originally Posted By ATC:
Originally Posted By Banditman:
My Ram 2500 demands 80#s in the rear.


You can set it to any pressure:

http://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/2013-general-discussion/1670642-how-set-tpms-any-pressure.html

Link Posted: 12/16/2016 11:39:09 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/16/2016 11:40:11 AM EST by mpatch]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ATC:

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Originally Posted By ATC:
Originally Posted By Banditman:
My Ram 2500 demands 80#s in the rear.


Dealer wants $90 to lower my TPMS. 
Link Posted: 12/18/2016 12:11:26 PM EST
Let the chalk tell you
You can also “calculate” your tire pressure with the chalk method. This involves coloring a section of your tire with chalk to see how much tread is making contact with the ground. Start by finding a flat road surface. Concrete is actually the best choice, but you can also do this on asphalt. Make a mark with soft chalk that goes all the way across your tread. Then, gradually drive your truck forward about 50 feet and then backwards 50 feet.

Analyze the chalk on the tire. If the chalk is only worn off on the center of the tire, reduce the tire pressure slightly and go through the process again. With the adjustment, you should see the chalk wear off more broadly. Keep making tiny adjustments in the tire pressure until the chalk wears off evenly and all the way across the tread.

You will have to complete this process for each of your four tires. Once you’ve found the right street pressure, add 10% to all four tires. Then, measure the tires and add pressure to balance them. As explained above, you need to measure from the wheel to the ground. Start by balancing the profiles of the front tires with each other. Then, balance the front tires again with the rear tires. Always adjust the tires with the smaller profiles by adding air.

The advantages and disadvantages of this method are the same as those involved in the second method above. If you go through the process correctly, you end up with the ideal tire pressure. But, this method is tedious and there’s a reasonable chance that you will make a mistake.
Link Posted: 12/20/2016 10:31:34 AM EST
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Originally Posted By mpatch:

Dealer wants $90 to lower my TPMS. 
View Quote


Find another dealer. I went through this several years ago when I wanted a few things enabled on my Dodge. Your dealer is trying to charge you the minimum 1hr shop rate for a 10 minute job that doesn't involve picking up a wrench. Let them know that you know it only takes <10mins with a computer and you don't want to be ripped off on 'labor' rates.

On my '06, I had them enable the PTO high-idle. Said it was free...no charge. Only took 5 minutes.
On my '07, I took my truck to the same dealer to enable the fog lights (didn't come factory...I added OEM fogs & switch). They told me $100. Their 1-hr labor rate. I laughed and walked out. Spent $8 on a relay and switch and wired it up myself in 30 mins.

Link Posted: 12/20/2016 7:20:12 PM EST


55-60

Link Posted: 12/20/2016 8:25:43 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Banditman:
My Ram 2500 demands 80#s in the rear.
View Quote


What is "demanding" this?
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 1:31:49 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Banditman:
My Ram 2500 demands 80#s in the rear.
View Quote



Theres a way around that. See ATC's post.
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 4:30:38 PM EST
My Silverado is supposed to have 60 in front, 80 in the rear.
I run between 65-70 all around (the light comes on for the rears at 63).
My original rear tires wore out in the middle when they were set at 80.
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