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Posted: 8/8/2011 3:17:47 PM EDT
Tryin to investigate this situation because I hear it can be a Marriage killer, I know I havent been to boot camp yet so I havent got too much to worry about yet besides not dying at Parris Island.

But how often are they handed out? Is this something that happens frequently? Im not talking about getting deployed to Iraq or anything Im talking about like getting sent to Oki while she still has to stay at the other base. I understand some people may have gotten them but I figure that given the current state of the economy they wouldnt be handing them out too too often.
Link Posted: 8/8/2011 4:50:09 PM EDT
They are not as common as accompanied orders but it's still a possibility. If they give it to you out of boot, ask if it's possible to change them. Usually they are for a shorter duration. In the Army and Navy (from my personal experience) they're about a yr or so. if you're marriage can't survive a yr, it wasn't going to work anyways.

I've been gone from home for 5 yrs. Now that is something that strains a marriage.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 3:13:55 AM EDT
This is why it takes a waiver to enlist as a married guy.

Is it possible? Sure. Is it fair? Probably not. Is it the needs of the Marine Corps? Yep. Get used to that phrase if you're serious about this path you're going down. You either want to be a Marine or you don't. If you're not willing to do what you need to do, your career will suffer. Get it sorted out now whether or not you're willing AND able to do what it takes.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 12:50:08 PM EDT
Unaccompanied orders kind of suck but they are entirely dependent on location. From what I've seen of the Marine Corps most bases you go to you can have your family with you.

I knew a MSgt whose wife was in a tiny career field where there was less than 150 people in it. Husband was sent to my base and they couldn't place her at our base and wife was sent to a base on the east coast. 2000 miles to separate a family all while CONUS. That sucked for the MSgt. He could only hope the assignment system would work out for him in a couple of years or he'd have to retire earlier than he wanted to be with his wife again.

Link Posted: 8/9/2011 7:04:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FLAESQ:
This is why it takes a waiver to enlist as a married guy.

Is it possible? Sure. Is it fair? Probably not. Is it the needs of the Marine Corps? Yep. Get used to that phrase if you're serious about this path you're going down. You either want to be a Marine or you don't. If you're not willing to do what you need to do, your career will suffer. Get it sorted out now whether or not you're willing AND able to do what it takes.

Does it require a waiver? Maybe I got it without knowing it. Im willing to do it if it is necessary, would i be thrilled about it? Like most of the men stationed without their spouses no i wouldnt be.

But I am glad at most USMC bases the spouse can come.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 2:37:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ElPresidenteAnRK:

Originally Posted By FLAESQ:
This is why it takes a waiver to enlist as a married guy.

Is it possible? Sure. Is it fair? Probably not. Is it the needs of the Marine Corps? Yep. Get used to that phrase if you're serious about this path you're going down. You either want to be a Marine or you don't. If you're not willing to do what you need to do, your career will suffer. Get it sorted out now whether or not you're willing AND able to do what it takes.

Does it require a waiver? Maybe I got it without knowing it. Im willing to do it if it is necessary, would i be thrilled about it? Like most of the men stationed without their spouses no i wouldnt be.

But I am glad at most USMC bases the spouse can come.


You need a waiver if you're married with kids. Even so, recruits with dependents (including a spouse but no kids) are one of the highest MCRD Discharge categories. Not trying to discourage you, but I've seen this a lot having been on the Drill Field and recruiting duty. No one goes to Parris Island thinking they won't make it. But once they get there, doubt sets in, worries about what's going on at home creeps in, worry about how it will work with their family after they graduate shows up and before you know it, the recruit is depressed and missing his wife/kids/sick mom/dog and they create an excuse to give up. Steel yourself to it now if you're serious about this. No one thinks it will happen to them. But it does, a lot more often than you imagine.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 6:50:01 AM EDT
You usually the only time you see unaccompanied orders is for junior marines that get orders to oki or japan. It's a 2 year stint now days. If you get married, prior to getting orders, you shouldn't have to worry.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 9:04:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/10/2011 9:08:00 AM EDT by ElPresidenteAnRK]

Originally Posted By FLAESQ:
Originally Posted By ElPresidenteAnRK:

Originally Posted By FLAESQ:
This is why it takes a waiver to enlist as a married guy.

Is it possible? Sure. Is it fair? Probably not. Is it the needs of the Marine Corps? Yep. Get used to that phrase if you're serious about this path you're going down. You either want to be a Marine or you don't. If you're not willing to do what you need to do, your career will suffer. Get it sorted out now whether or not you're willing AND able to do what it takes.

Does it require a waiver? Maybe I got it without knowing it. Im willing to do it if it is necessary, would i be thrilled about it? Like most of the men stationed without their spouses no i wouldnt be.

But I am glad at most USMC bases the spouse can come.


You need a waiver if you're married with kids. Even so, recruits with dependents (including a spouse but no kids) are one of the highest MCRD Discharge categories. Not trying to discourage you, but I've seen this a lot having been on the Drill Field and recruiting duty. No one goes to Parris Island thinking they won't make it. But once they get there, doubt sets in, worries about what's going on at home creeps in, worry about how it will work with their family after they graduate shows up and before you know it, the recruit is depressed and missing his wife/kids/sick mom/dog and they create an excuse to give up. Steel yourself to it now if you're serious about this. No one thinks it will happen to them. But it does, a lot more often than you imagine.


Well when I initially started this process we were not in a good spot (things are improving a lot) but I told her wether she comes or not I am going to do this. I want her to come with me obviously shes my wife and I still love her. But one way or the other I am getting on a Plane Bus or Train and I am going to the island and earning my title. I was just hoping that she could come with me to my duty stations so it doesnt make shit worse.

Not that Ill try to dip out because of her or nothing but this is one of those you have to understand where im coming from things. I know being a military spouse wont make things a whole hell of a lot easier but I figured itll help us on to a new path.

ETA: My recruiter knows about all this stuff, so hes on board and I trust him so i figure it should be good. one way or the other. Im still quite young (27 old compared to USMC standards) but if it ends i can always find another.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 1:19:40 PM EDT
At 27 I'm surprised a Marine recruiter gave you the time of day. At 25 I went to see about joining the Marines and he told me while he had no doubts I could handle boot camp and the fleet, he said at my age I was too set in my ways and I would hate every day of it. Most Marine vets I've known said that was dead on and the Marines like bringing in 18 year old kids who don't know any better.

So I did the next best thing, I joined the Air Force. . I think the recruiter was right. I was too set in my ways and hated even a psuedo branch of the military. But, I had fun shooting mortars and Mk19's, partying all over the world and pissing in phone booths while drunk off my ass.

I'd say right now just worry about getting through recruit training and worry about accompanied orders and all the other bullshit later.






Link Posted: 8/11/2011 7:01:58 PM EDT
The most important part of any unaccompanied stint is the PCD. But only if you're married or in a serious relationship.
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