Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 8/30/2004 8:55:27 AM EST
I went to usps and shipped a gun to an FFL dealer and i have his copy of the FFL, i get home and the post office calls and told me i cant ship guns in mail it's not legal.
the gun is a AK47 PREBAN SIDE FOLDER. now i wonder how he new there was a gun in there ?
maybe because it was to best guns wich is the ffl ? if he opened my package i am gona be pissed.

is it legal to ship long guns with USPS ?

i need to know for sure before i go make a big deal outa this.

thanks,,,

Link Posted: 8/30/2004 10:12:23 AM EST
XXXXXX ray?
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 1:11:22 PM EST
Perfectly Legal.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 2:19:30 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/30/2004 2:22:00 PM EST by EOD_Guy]
Tell the clerk to check Section C024 of the Domestic Mail Manual. It is perfectly legal for an individual to mail any rifle or shotgun to an FFL. If they mention filling out forms or that you have to be a dealer, tell them that is only for handguns.

Let us know how it turns out.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 6:35:37 PM EST
usps accepted the package after a few phone calls one of wich was to the local police,at this point i am about to these peaple !

after 20 minutes of waiting for the phoneathon to end they finally shipped the package ,

they guy said well hell i cant beleave thats legal, i was put on trial by usps !
any way thanks guys for your replys !

all ends well !
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 8:18:40 AM EST
USPS Publication 52

Not only can you mail a long gun to a dealer in another state or in your own, you can also mail a long gun to any private individual legally able to posses such firearm as long as he resides within your own state.

Check it out here: ATF FAQs

Remember "licensee" in ATF-speak means FFL holder.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 4:27:20 AM EST

Originally Posted By SWO_daddy:
USPS Publication 52

Not only can you mail a long gun to a dealer in another state or in your own, you can also mail a long gun to any private individual legally able to posses such firearm as long as he resides within your own state.

Check it out here: ATF FAQs

Remember "licensee" in ATF-speak means FFL holder.



I would not use Publication 52 as a reference. It has a few errors in it just like the BATF FAQ's have some. Use the Domestic Mail Manual, which is the official guide to the Postal regulations. Publication 52 is a consumer guide.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 3:51:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/1/2004 3:53:34 PM EST by rkbar15]
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 7:45:41 AM EST

Originally Posted By EOD_Guy:

Originally Posted By SWO_daddy:
USPS Publication 52

Not only can you mail a long gun to a dealer in another state or in your own, you can also mail a long gun to any private individual legally able to posses such firearm as long as he resides within your own state.

Check it out here: ATF FAQs

Remember "licensee" in ATF-speak means FFL holder.



I would not use Publication 52 as a reference. It has a few errors in it just like the BATF FAQ's have some. Use the Domestic Mail Manual, which is the official guide to the Postal regulations. Publication 52 is a consumer guide.



Could you point those errors out to me?
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 1:26:09 PM EST
Strange thing happend to me recently. I have shipped long rifles with no problems before with the USPS. But this last time they asked me to write on the outside of the box that the gun was not loaded, and they asked me to sign it. I did this so I could get it in the mail, but I mentioned to the clerk that I have never had to do this in the past, and I was concerned that such writing may tip off a thief as to what was in the box. They said this is the was it is.

Anyone have any insight into this "requirement"?

- Snacko
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 3:26:34 PM EST

Originally Posted By Snacko:
Strange thing happend to me recently. I have shipped long rifles with no problems before with the USPS. But this last time they asked me to write on the outside of the box that the gun was not loaded, and they asked me to sign it. I did this so I could get it in the mail, but I mentioned to the clerk that I have never had to do this in the past, and I was concerned that such writing may tip off a thief as to what was in the box. They said this is the was it is.

Anyone have any insight into this "requirement"?

- Snacko



Tell them to read their own regulations. They can require you to demonstrate that the gun is unloaded or ask you to make a written certification but it is prohibited to mark the outside of the package.

C024 Other Restricted or Nonmailable Matter
Summary C024 describes other restricted or nonmailable items (e.g., firearms, sharp
instruments, controlled substances, pesticides).

.....................................

6.0 PROHIBITED PARCEL MARKING
For any parcel containing a firearm or a ballistic or switchblade knife, any marking
that indicates the contents is not permitted on the outside wrapper or container.
Link Posted: 9/6/2004 3:00:40 PM EST
For gods sake I shipped HUNDREDS of machineguns m60,M16a1 and received m16a2's by usps regestered mail when I was in the Marine Corps. Pinche post office pukes.
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 3:48:05 AM EST

Originally Posted By SWO_daddy:

Originally Posted By EOD_Guy:

Originally Posted By SWO_daddy:
USPS Publication 52

Not only can you mail a long gun to a dealer in another state or in your own, you can also mail a long gun to any private individual legally able to posses such firearm as long as he resides within your own state.

Check it out here: ATF FAQs

Remember "licensee" in ATF-speak means FFL holder.



I would not use Publication 52 as a reference. It has a few errors in it just like the BATF FAQ's have some. Use the Domestic Mail Manual, which is the official guide to the Postal regulations. Publication 52 is a consumer guide.



Could you point those errors out to me?



One off the top of my head is the definition of an antique firearm. The wording and punctuation in Publication 52 indicates that they cannot use currently manufactured ammunition. The Domestic Mail Manual correctly defines an antique firearm and indicates that only replicas of antique firearms are restricted in the type of ammunition.
Link Posted: 9/13/2004 2:09:29 PM EST
And the fact that all state laws are not the same and if you give advice it should be noted that you're talking about the fed law and your own state laws and that their state law may vary.
Top Top