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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/5/2005 10:15:49 AM EDT
Vessel Tows Away Stranded Russian Mini-Sub By YEVGENY KULKOV, Associated Press Writer
33 minutes ago



VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - A Russian mini-submarine carrying seven sailors snagged on a fishing net and was stuck 625 feet down on the Pacific floor Friday. A Russian vessel later towed the stranded sub to shallower waters as the United States and Britain rushed unmanned vehicles there to help in rescue efforts.

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It was unclear whether there was enough oxygen aboard the mini-sub to keep the crew alive long enough for remote-controlled vehicles to reach them from bases in San Diego and Britain.

A Russian rescue vessel hooked a cable onto the mini-submarine and was towing it to shallower waters, the commander of the Pacific Fleet was quoted as saying later Friday.

Admiral Viktor Fyodorov said the rescue vessel was trying to raise the stranded vessel as it was being towed, the Interfax news agency reported.

However, the agency later cited the deputy head of the naval general staff, Vladimir Pepelayev, as saying it was premature to say the mini-sub had been hooked.

Navy spokesman Capt. Igor Dygalo told The Associated Press that tension was noted on a cable being used in the attempt to hook the submarine, but it could not be confirmed that the vessel had been snagged.

Interfax earlier quoted Fyodorov as saying the crew's air supply would last until sometime Monday. However, he earlier told Russia's Channel One television that air would last "a little more than 24 hours."

The Russian sub's propeller became entangled in a fishing net Thursday, Dygalo said on state-run Rossiya television. The accident occurred in Beryozovaya Bay, about 50 miles south of Kamchatka's capital, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, officials said.

"There is air remaining on the underwater apparatus for a day — one day," Dygalo said at about 6 a.m. EDT. "The operation continues. We have a day, and intensive, active measures will be taken to rescue the AS-28 vessel and the people aboard."

Fleet spokesman Capt. Alexander Kosolapov said contact had been made with the sailors, who were not hurt.

The mini-sub, called an AS-28, initially was too deep to allow the sailors to swim to the surface on their own or divers to reach it, officials said. However, dragging the sub into shallower waters could make such an escape or rescue possible.

The crisis evoked comparisons with the 2000 disaster involving the nuclear submarine Kursk. The Kursk sank to the bottom of the Barents Sea after explosions on board, killing all 118 seamen aboard.

However, some Kursk sailors survived for hours as oxygen ran out, and President Vladimir Putin was criticized severely for waiting several days before asking for international assistance. Also, Russian divers discharged by the navy for lack of funds said at the time their own offers to help were rebuffed.

This time, Russia waited just a day before seeking help.

Both accidents raised questions about the state of Russia's cash-strapped military. The same type of vessel that is now stuck, called a Priz, was used in the rescue efforts that followed the Kursk disaster, Interfax reported.

The latest accident occurred early Thursday after the mini-submarine was launched from a rescue ship during a combat training exercise, Kosolapov said. The AS-28, built in 1989, is about 44 feet long and 19 feet high and can dive to depths of 1,640 feet.

Russia appealed to the United States and Japan for assistance, the Interfax news agency quoted Foreign Ministry spokesman Boris Malakhov as saying.

The U.S. Navy was loading two robotic rescue vehicles aboard a massive C-5 transport plane at Naval Air Station North Island near San Diego for the flight to Russia. The loading was expected to take about two hours, officials said.

The unmanned vehicle, called a Super Scorpio, can reach depths of up to 5,000 feet and is equipped with high-powered lights, sonar and video cameras, said Capt. Matt Brown, a spokesman for the U.S. Navy's Pacific Fleet in Honolulu.

The Deep Submergence Unit team is scheduled to depart at 1:45 p.m. EDT, the Pentagon said.

The Super Scorpio then will be transported by truck and loaded on a Russian ship before making its descent to the stricken vessel.

Brown said the Russian military has indicated that the AS-28 may have been fouled by fishing nets or steel cables. The Super Scorpio has an instrument that can cut 1-inch-thick steel cables, he said.

The Super Scorpio, which weighs about 4,500 pounds, has been used to conduct underwater surveys and inspections.

About 30 people will accompany the vehicle to Russia, Brown said.

"We are working as fast as we can to make this happen," he said.

The British vehicle was being loaded onto a Royal Air Force transport plane at Scotland's Prestwick airport and was expected to arrive at Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, the city nearest the site, at about 5 a.m. Saturday, said Anton Atrashkin, spokesman for the British Embassy in Moscow.

That means the British vessel likely will arrive before the U.S. vessel.

Since Soviet times, the Kamchatka Peninsula has housed several major submarine bases and numerous other military facilities, and large areas of it have remained closed to outsiders.

Airlifting a U.S. underwater vehicle to the area will mark the first time since the World War II era that a U.S. military plane has been allowed to fly there.

At Moscow's request, Japan dispatched a vessel carrying submarine rescue gear and three other ships to join salvage efforts, but they were not expected to arrive at the scene until early next week, Marine Self Defense Force spokesman Hidetsubu Iwamasa said.

Since the Soviet collapse, the Russian navy has struggled to find funds to maintain and repair its ships and has had to scale back its modernization program.

___

Link Posted: 8/5/2005 10:23:07 AM EDT
Heres hoping it comes out for the better.....
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 10:24:00 AM EDT
Pray for those sailors.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 10:26:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By macman37:
Pray for those sailors.



Yep. I hope they get out safely, because it sucks being stuck in a sub 625 feet from the surface.

Ben
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 10:30:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fadedsun:

Originally Posted By macman37:
Pray for those sailors.



Yep. I hope they get out safely, because it sucks being stuck in a sub 625 feet from the surface.

Ben



Thats gotta be the worst goddamn feeling in the whole world.
Your stuck in a metal can on the botton of the ocean floor, and you know its going to become your tomb......
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 10:31:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By macman37:
Pray for those sailors.



+1
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 10:40:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By macman37:
Pray for those sailors.



Amen.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 10:47:25 AM EDT
FNC is reporting that the tow line has gone slack. Situation unknown.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 10:55:08 AM EDT
Lucky the British decided to pony up the funds to buy that handful of C-17's they got.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 1:03:27 PM EDT
Where does it say that the USN had anything to do with snagging or towing the sub?
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 2:24:31 PM EDT
any update on this.. ?
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 2:29:16 PM EDT
I hope we have a happy ending on this one.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 2:32:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/5/2005 2:35:47 PM EDT by eodtech2000]
I heard something earlier in the day that the USN was loading up 2 robotic submersibles and some deep diving suits on a C-5.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 2:46:37 PM EDT
I hope it turns out OK.

Taggin this for more updates.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 2:47:42 PM EDT
Nasty way to go. Hope they're OK.....
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 2:49:12 PM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 2:49:12 PM EDT
They spite us with their little relationship with the damn Chinese. And when they need saving who comes to their rescue? Not the CHinese but the US Navy. Damn I hate those ungrateful commies.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 5:38:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By neilfj:
Where does it say that the USN had anything to do with snagging or towing the sub?



It doesn't and neither do any more of the news reports. Nobody said that reading or writing for comprehension is a major strength around here.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 5:40:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PaDanby:

Originally Posted By neilfj:
Where does it say that the USN had anything to do with snagging or towing the sub?



It doesn't and neither do any more of the news reports. Nobody said that reading or writing for comprehension is a major strength around here.



Read the title of the thread.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 5:40:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By macman37:
Pray for those sailors.




+1
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 6:00:08 PM EDT
I like the way it became "USN tows sub"

I think they'll make it out this time. The Russians haven't hung around asking for help, and it's neither stupidly deep or overly far from a port/airport combo. If they can't rescue this boat, they probably can't rescue other boats elsewhere in the world.

NTM
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 7:19:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PaDanby:

Originally Posted By neilfj:
Where does it say that the USN had anything to do with snagging or towing the sub?



It doesn't and neither do any more of the news reports. Nobody said that reading or writing for comprehension is a major strength around here.



No use in letting reality get in the way of a title. The USN hadn't even arrived on site, yet they've managed to tow the sub to safety.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 7:22:49 PM EDT
FNC said that the USN was saving them. It's all over the mainstream media.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 8:20:24 PM EDT
My mistake, it was NOT the USN that was towing the ruskie sub.

ben
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 8:26:42 PM EDT
Them crazy Ruskie's and their problems with subs.

Link Posted: 8/5/2005 8:27:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/5/2005 8:28:58 PM EDT by SWO_daddy]
What sucks about this even more is that it really seems like a freak accident that would be hard to prevent, if indeed the subs prop got tangled on a fishing net.

It's not like you have windows to look out through, and fishermen cast old, decrepit, or broken beyond repair nets at sea.

I hope those guys hang on. In the end, sailors the world over have one common enemy: the sea. And when the sea tries to take some of us away, nationalities no longer matter when answering that distress call.

Zaphod, L Wilde, and dport know exactly what I'm talking about.

Eternal Father, Strong to save,
Whose arm hath bound the restless wave,
Who bid'st the mighty Ocean deep
Its own appointed limits keep;
O hear us when we cry to thee,
for those in peril on the sea.

O Christ! Whose voice the waters heard
And hushed their raging at Thy word,
Who walked'st on the foaming deep,
and calm amidst its rage didst sleep;
Oh hear us when we cry to Thee
For those in peril on the sea!

Link Posted: 8/5/2005 8:32:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By RABIDFOX50:
I hope it turns out OK.

Taggin this for more updates.

Link Posted: 8/5/2005 10:15:42 PM EDT
I really want to see these guys saved.... God bless all involved.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 10:39:25 PM EDT
One of the reasons I went Aviation until my ears went bad and then surface. Things that go up have to come down but things that go down don't have to come up.

That has to be a hell of a way to go, knowing it's coming, not a damn thing you can do about it, and it wasn't anybodys fault.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 12:22:19 PM EDT
any updates?
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 12:31:50 PM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:05:13 PM EDT
FNC reported that the sub has been freed from the entrapment and they are awaiting it's surfacing.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:12:13 PM EDT
Reuters is reporting that the sub is(or was) actually hung up on an anntenna on an underwater sensor that the Ruskies placed all around their coastline.

Hope everthing turns out OK
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:28:23 PM EDT
British rescue vehicle starts cutting free Russia mini-sub
Xinhua - 1 hour ago

MOSCOW, Aug 7 (Xinhuanet) -- A British undersea robot, the Scorpio rescue vehicle, has started cutting free a Russian mini-submarine trapped 190 meters down in the Pacific, Interfax news agency reported on Sunday.

"It (the Scorpio) arrived at the AS-28 mini-submarine and at 0305 Moscow time (2305 GMT) started to cut the main cable keeping the underwater machine in the deep," Interfax quoted Alexander Kosolapov, the head of the Russian Pacific Fleet press service, as saying.

"Steps have been taken to clear the area of the operation for the planned resurfacing of the AS-28 submarine," the spokesman said.

"The propeller has been totally unblocked. The crew has confirmed it is prepared for an emergency resurfacing," he added.

"Everything has been prepared for the evacuation of the crew," the Interfax quoted him as saying. Enditem
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:36:19 PM EDT
Fox is reporting the Sub has been freed from the fishing nets by a British un-manned submersible and is under it's own power, headed for the surface.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:42:53 PM EDT
The Americans are probably a little irked... All that travelling, and the Brits beat them to it...and succeeded.

I'm trying to figure out if it means anything that the Brits who, if I recall my globe correctly, had less distance to travel, were able to get their rescue sub to the site before the Americans could.

I like the whole 'preparing to surface' bit. If I were the lads in that boat, I'd be hitting the ballast tanks as soon as they reported cable clear!

NTM
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:48:56 PM EDT
I'm just happy to hear that the situation is looking good. Being stuck on the ocean floor waiting to die would have to suck more than anything.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:51:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sysop:
Fox is reporting the Sub has been freed from the fishing nets by a British un-manned submersible and is under it's own power, headed for the surface.



Cool! Link?

ben
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:55:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fadedsun:

Originally Posted By sysop:
Fox is reporting the Sub has been freed from the fishing nets by a British un-manned submersible and is under it's own power, headed for the surface.



Cool! Link?

ben



Um, they don't have links on the Radio.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:55:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Manic_Moran:
The Americans are probably a little irked... All that travelling, and the Brits beat them to it...and succeeded.

I'm trying to figure out if it means anything that the Brits who, if I recall my globe correctly, had less distance to travel, were able to get their rescue sub to the site before the Americans could.

I like the whole 'preparing to surface' bit. If I were the lads in that boat, I'd be hitting the ballast tanks as soon as they reported cable clear!

NTM


I doubt they're irked. Disappointed? Maybe. I can imagine the divers train and train for something that thankfully they almost never have to do. So I imagine there is a little disappointment there. But I know there is a whole hell of a lot more relief and celebration.

Besides the Brits used an American made sub, so it all evens out in the end.


BTW, I heard the reason it took the American team longer is they were loading two mini-subs instead of one. Looks like the Brits were trying to get there quick, and we were the backup. My guess is there was a collective decision to execute it that way.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:07:26 PM EDT
There was a USN dive team, including a doctor, with the Brits.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:13:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dport:

Originally Posted By Manic_Moran:
The Americans are probably a little irked... All that travelling, and the Brits beat them to it...and succeeded.

I'm trying to figure out if it means anything that the Brits who, if I recall my globe correctly, had less distance to travel, were able to get their rescue sub to the site before the Americans could.

I like the whole 'preparing to surface' bit. If I were the lads in that boat, I'd be hitting the ballast tanks as soon as they reported cable clear!

NTM


I doubt they're irked. Disappointed? Maybe. I can imagine the divers train and train for something that thankfully they almost never have to do. So I imagine there is a little disappointment there. But I know there is a whole hell of a lot more relief and celebration.

Besides the Brits used an American made sub, so it all evens out in the end.


BTW, I heard the reason it took the American team longer is they were loading two mini-subs instead of one. Looks like the Brits were trying to get there quick, and we were the backup. My guess is there was a collective decision to execute it that way.



Holy Loch (SWAG) closer by a great circle flight? and with a transport closer. I would make another edumacated guess that while the boys at North Island were turning up, it was taking a little while to get the C-5 diverted or made ready (Travis based?) and sent to North Island

Kind of like when your neighbors house catches fire you start squirting with the garden hose waiting for the firetrucks to come. And the first engine company on scene doesn't wait for the rest to arrive to get started either. And the dispatcher may spin up the mutual aid companies to roll before waiting. for word from the scene.

And if it is a spider web of nets and cables it might very easily have required a few mini's to get things taken care of. I know we ran into a drift net once up by there and saw several others.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:22:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/6/2005 7:28:58 PM EDT by dport]

Originally Posted By PaDanby:
Holy Loch (SWAG) closer by a great circle flight? and with a transport closer. I would make another edumacated guess that while the boys at North Island were turning up, it was taking a little while to get the C-5 diverted or made ready (Travis based?) and sent to North Island


That's definitely a big part of it. However, FoxNews was reporting that the unloading of the C-5 and loading of the ship was taking longer than the Brits because we had two subs. From what I gathered both teams were on the ground at the same time. No word on who arrived first; although, I'm sure the Brits got there first.

ETA: Just checked it looks like Scotland is only about an hour closer by air than San Diego.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 9:34:43 PM EDT
Well, egos aside the Brits got the job done. That's the important thing. It's just good to see the Russians are willing to have other nations help out when lives are at stake. Hard and terrible lesson learned after the Kursk.


All 7 are alive and being checked out. Glad to see this ended with no one lost.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 10:32:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By RABIDFOX50:


All 7 are alive and being checked out. Glad to see this ended with no one lost.





Thank God for that.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 10:40:16 PM EDT
Good to hear the Russkies got their guys back.

Ben
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 10:46:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/6/2005 10:46:37 PM EDT by KlubMarcus]

Originally Posted By fadedsun: Good to hear the Russkies got their guys back. Ben
Democratic Underground Mode On

It was all part of a secret CIA hoax to capture Russian equipment. Karl Rove is behind it, I can tell because his name is Karl (a Russian name).

Democratic Underground Mode Off
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