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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 9/30/2004 7:56:33 PM EST
Osprey squadron conducts tests in an austere environment

Submitted by: MCAS New River

Story by: Computed Name: 1st Lt. Katherine L. O'Neill
Story Identification #: 2004929165727

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION NEW RIVER, N.C.(Sept. 29, 2004) -- Members of Marine Tiltrotor Test and Evaluation Squadron- 22 are currently testing the Osprey in similar environments to Iraq.

The squadron, with four aircraft, traveled to Nellis Air Force Base, Las Vegas to assess operations in the austere environment and develop tactics, techniques and procedures as well as conduct pilot and aircrew proficiency training for their Operation Evaluation, which begins in January.

“The goal is not only to develop tactics, techniques and procedures but also to deploy as a unit,” said Marine Lt. Col. Christopher C. Seymour, Chief Operational Test Director for VMX-22.


Members of Marine Tiltrotor Test and Evaluation Squadron-22 traveled to Nellis Air Force Base, Las Vegas to assess operations in the austere environment and develop tactics, techniques and procedures as well as conduct pilot and aircrew proficiency training for their Operation Evaluation, which begins in January. The squadron, based at Marine Corps Air Station New River, will return Oct. 8.

Seymour, a native of Houston, Texas, and the officer in charge of the detachment said this deployment is a great orientation for Marines and Airmen who are junior to aviation and to the service to perform in an environment they do not work in on a daily basis.

“This deployment is a chance for our squadron to prepare for our OPEVAL, where we will have twice the amount of aircraft and spend up to five months testing in every clime and place,” said Seymour, “Over the next two weeks, our pilots will train and become competent in flying the Osprey in an austere environment, which is nothing but goodness.”



Airmen from Patuxent River, Md. and Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. are also training in this austere environment with the Marines.

“It is essential Airmen be involved in this training because the CV-22 is 85 percent common to the MV-22, said Air Force Master Sgt. John J. Lysaght, Maintenance Superintendent for Detachment 2 of the 18th Flight Test Squadron located at New River.

The CV-22 is the MV-22 with additional equipment such as radars, an electronic warfare platform and a Directional Infrared Counter Measures system.

Lysaght, native of St. Louis, said the Airman maintainers are working with the Marines and learning about the Block A configuration of the MV-22. The Airman then can take their experience and lessons learned back to their units and train other Airmen.

Lysaght said the Air Force will begin their OPEVAL in 2006, and this deployment is a chance for them to prepare. “It is an opportunity for them to pare and tailor their pack up list,” said Lysaght.

The squadron will return home mid-October and continue to prepare for their OPEVAL.
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 7:57:48 PM EST
That is such a neat aircraft. I hope its rocky history wont totally destroy its credibility.
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 8:05:10 PM EST
You know, I thought I saw everything at Nellis, but I don't remember seeing an Osprey at all. Is that aircraft finally good to go?
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 8:15:45 PM EST
I wonder how well it will hold up to large amounts of small arms fire and RPG's. I know Im just talking out of my ass here as I have no military experience, but its not too hard to read a story like Black Hawk Down and then picture something big like that comming down. They dont even have any armament like a Blackhawk do they? Feel free do educate me.
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 8:25:02 PM EST

Originally Posted By moneyshot:
I wonder how well it will hold up to large amounts of small arms fire and RPG's. I know Im just talking out of my ass here as I have no military experience, but its not too hard to read a story like Black Hawk Down and then picture something big like that comming down. They dont even have any armament like a Blackhawk do they? Feel free do educate me.



You can fit door & ramp guns to an Osprey...

As for small arms fire, they're a bit less suceptable than a Blackhawk, as there is no tail rotor...

If you hit either of the rotorheads, though, that will be a problem...

Either engine can turn both rotors, so loosing a motor won't bring it down...
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 8:30:00 PM EST

Originally Posted By Dave_A:

Originally Posted By moneyshot:
I wonder how well it will hold up to large amounts of small arms fire and RPG's. I know Im just talking out of my ass here as I have no military experience, but its not too hard to read a story like Black Hawk Down and then picture something big like that comming down. They dont even have any armament like a Blackhawk do they? Feel free do educate me.



You can fit door & ramp guns to an Osprey...

As for small arms fire, they're a bit less suceptable than a Blackhawk, as there is no tail rotor...

If you hit either of the rotorheads, though, that will be a problem...

Either engine can turn both rotors, so loosing a motor won't bring it down...



Besides being WAYY faster, the landing is quite a rollercoaster ride I hear. They come down REAL steep and fast so they can avoid exposing themselves to RPG and MG fire. You need a SAM to get one unless the pilot is stupid.
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 8:48:44 PM EST
WTF is going on with this thing. They are pushing 20 years in development,
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 4:47:12 AM EST

Originally Posted By Sukebe:
WTF is going on with this thing. They are pushing 20 years in development,



That's called breakthrough technology.

Maybe you should get hired as Program Director and show themhow to do it?
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 5:56:46 AM EST
They trying this deathtrap again?
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 6:09:26 AM EST
The Osprey has all the credibility of a Hindenburg Airship… it's an answer looking for a question… even the Marines are saying maybe they should stick with an upgraded Sea Stallion
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 8:10:01 AM EST
I can't believe they are STILL testing these things.
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 9:09:39 AM EST
Story by: Computed Name: 1st Lt. Katherine L. O'Neill


No enlisted person would write the story? They didn't think an enlisted would spin enough?

Vets, how many officer written stories did you ever see?
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 10:00:36 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/1/2004 10:01:44 AM EST by ASUsax]

Originally Posted By vito113:
The Osprey has all the credibility of a Hindenburg Airship… it's an answer looking for a question… even the Marines are saying maybe they should stick with an upgraded Sea Stallion



The Sea Stallion would be a viable option to replace the Sea Knight. But the CH-46 NEEDS to be replaced. (Edited to add: But it doesn't offer the advantages that the Osprey does. It's just a much better A/C than the CH-46, despite being almost as old.)

But the Osprey is true breakthrough technology- As fast as a C-130, but it can land like a helicopter. It's speed allows you to conduct over-the-horizon landings in enemy held terretory. This is particularly important to today's Navy. Any US operation is likely to have complete air supremacy, so the enemy will have to defend their entire coastline from your operations. Landing troops using things like the MV-22 and the LCAC will allow you to arrive at the coast with little to no advance notice to the enemy. You can defeat them before you even bring them to fight.

The biggest problem with the MV-22 is that it's crash rate is pretty high. The problem is that if it has problems in Helo mode, it's a difficult aircraft to 'crash' safely. It's my understanding that while it will auto-rotate, it's speed to do so it much higher than a normal Helo, making crashes more deadly. It's also an absolute deathtrap if it has problems while in 'transition' mode.

Keep in mind that Helo's in general have high crash rates - it's just that most helos, unless going 'low and fast' can safely autorotate to the ground, so you don't have any fatalities, just a busted bird and some battered crew.
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 10:02:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/1/2004 10:03:06 AM EST by CFII]

Originally Posted By Happyshooter:
Story by: Computed Name: 1st Lt. Katherine L. O'Neill


No enlisted person would write the story? They didn't think an enlisted would spin enough?

Vets, how many officer written stories did you ever see?





Good point. Maybe she is the best writer they have?
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