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Posted: 5/13/2004 6:55:21 AM EST
i just saw a special on these guys. Even though their job is search and rescue as opposed to destroy. They go thru some of the most rigorous training along with having to be level 2 medics.
Supposedly their dropout rate is the highest. Dont here much about them, like u do with Seals and other elite units.

Just curious how they stack up to the other US elite units

Feedback please
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 7:00:30 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/13/2004 7:33:25 AM EST by Noname]
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 7:01:20 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/13/2004 7:02:58 AM EST by ResqGuy]
Check this site:

www.specialtactics.com/index.html
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 7:05:11 AM EST
My dad was the first CINC of the 23AF in the late 80s, consolidating the ARRS, rescue, with AF Special OPs, ie AC130s.

I got to travel to Hurlburt to watch a Shuttle launch, his men handled security and rescue.

Those were some bad MOFOS.
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 7:07:32 AM EST
PJs are highly, highly trained soldiers/medics.
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 7:14:00 AM EST

Originally Posted By Wobblin-Goblin:
PJs are highly, highly trained soldiers/medics.



Yup. 100%. PJ are one of the military's best kept secrets. Of course, I'm not speaking literally, but not many people have ever heard of PJ units and they hardly ever get press.
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 7:14:32 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/13/2004 7:56:57 PM EST by CAR-10]
You might think back to the Black Hawk Down. There was one PJ mentioned, then TSgt Wilkenson or Wilky. These are some tough hombres.

Until recently there was no officer corps, the senior enlisted managed and led the units. I'm not quite sure the specifics of the chain-of-command. I did meet a 2Lt who was a Chief MSgt but was selected to be one of the first officers.

I'm not sure how they stack up against the rest of America's special forces but they are damn tough. When I worked on the W-80 I hung out with a one guy and knew another guy who washed out of the program for various reasons. I think 1 out of 10 actually makes it all of the way through. These dudes are tough.
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 7:22:11 AM EST

I've worked with some of the CSAR folks. PJs have my utmost respect.

Interestingly, the CSAR mission recently moved from Air Combat Command (ACC) to AFSOC.

Link Posted: 5/13/2004 8:09:10 AM EST
PJs are some hard guys. They and CCTs are often attached to some of the big 'glory' units. They're well trained by any standard, but their water PT is insane. They also have, quite possibly, the coolest pipeline out there for an SOF group: guaranteed slots in combat diver and mil freefall.
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 8:54:23 AM EST
My doctor was a PJ for 17 years. Decided he had done that enough and went to college and medical school, graduated medical school well into his 40's. He is quiet spoken and a little nerdy looking, but very, very, very competent and motivated.

The PJ's water training is a near copy to the SEAL program. They also have extensive mountaineering and high angle rescue training. If there is a nasty environment on earth, the PJ's have been there and trained to cope with it, and have probably pulled off a rescue there. PJ teams regularly attack Mt. McKinley in Alaska. They are trained to stabilize life threatening injuries and even perform minor surgery under conditions that would make an ER doc soil his or her undergarments and to fight ferociously to protect their patent(s) as necessary.

They get all the training of a SEAL corpsman but with MORE medical training and a very strong focus on saving lives.

Their motto is "So that others may live" it is not possible to undertake a more honorable military service.
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 9:07:19 AM EST
They get to use the star gate also .
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 9:09:23 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/13/2004 9:15:31 AM EST by Thunderbolt]
they're primary job is to rescue downed airmen, they are the Special Forces of the AF. They are also trained as combat divers, I was at the lake and saw a pontoon boat at the dock that was marked US AIR FORCE, PARA-RESCUE Training , no trespassing, etc. I think it was used for "PARA RESCUE Combat Diver's trainees? this was at a lake near a USAF base.

they are just as tough as any other SF unit...
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 9:09:47 AM EST
Pj training is masochism at it finest, I've got a lot of respect for those guys
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 9:13:43 AM EST
A couple of "The Perfect Storm" heroes were PJs.
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 9:43:41 AM EST
See the book titled " That others may Live" by Sgt Jack Brehm.

Its his biography and details a variety of his real life exploits, including a rescue on Mt. McKinley.

I think this dude was in for like 20 years, and never made more than like $40,000 a year.

I remember part of the book where they interview his 16 year old daughter. She states that he is a bad driver, can barely handle the family car. Also, that he had no concept of money, that he would give you everything he had in his pockets if you asked...

A good read. He is the kind of guy who went in the service young, and was very focused. Good thing we have people like him on our side!
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 10:04:05 AM EST
I'm a gunner on HH60 Pavehawks and our primary customers are PJ's. Basically we're their transportation. Our guys know their shit that's a fact. We've got Ex-Seals, Ex-Force Recon dudes, and everyone in between on the team here.

As a matter of fact, if somebody get hurt playing hockey, crashes a mountain bike, or gets sick, usually we go over to the PJ section to get treated so we don't go DNIF.

DG84
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 10:08:00 AM EST
I had the opportunity in 1992 to try out for PJs(Para-Rescue/Combat Controller). I told them very politely thanks but no thanks!! I had law enforcement specialist training guaranteed and I knew that if I washed out of PJ preliminary training I'd end up as a security specialist humping B-52s in Minot, ND!! Seriously, I knew I wasn't a strong enough swimmer to even seriously consider it an option...Besides I went into the USAF because I wasn't old enough to be a civilian LEO!
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 11:00:38 AM EST
Check out a book called "None Braver" by Michael Hirsh. It is about PJ's in the war on terror in Afghanistan. Very, very good book.

Here is a cut from Stuff magazine about it: None Braver

Rob
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 1:23:50 PM EST
There's another book called "Pararescue".It's about a PJ unit in the New York Air National Guard based out of Long Island and thier rescue of a merchant sailor during a shipwreck in the North Atlantic.Incredible story.Describes alot of the training and rescue missions that this unit was involved with over the years.That unit is probably in Iraq now.

Semper Fi,
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 1:28:01 PM EST

Originally Posted By SGT_GRUNT_USMC:
There's another book called "Pararescue".It's about a PJ unit in the New York Air National Guard based out of Long Island and thier rescue of a merchant sailor during a shipwreck in the North Atlantic.Incredible story.Describes alot of the training and rescue missions that this unit was involved with over the years.That unit is probably in Iraq now.

Semper Fi,



I believe that book is also written by Michael Hirsh.

Rob
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 1:31:56 PM EST
yeah just looked on my bookshelf...yes it is
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 2:58:52 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 3:16:32 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 3:17:31 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 3:22:24 PM EST
PJs are unique.

Like the SEALs, the Green Berets ( officially SF ) are highly trained in the art of killing. But they are also trained in the delicate art of winning the hearts and minds of people.

The PJs are more or less the same thing. They save lives, and can kick some serious ass when provoked. They will move heaven and earth to retrieve a wounded man.

We could use some more SF in Iraq right now. Winning hearts and minds is exactly what we need to do. Kicking ass is also a priority, which is why I would perfer to send SF, Rangers and PJs inland. Leave securing of the ports and waterways, as well as high-profile raids/strikes to SEALs.

All of those guys are amazing in every respect.
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 4:19:59 PM EST
Good thread, folks. It's nice to be able to honor these men, even if it is in a simple discussion forum thread.
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 4:53:45 PM EST
What Wobblin said.
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 5:07:05 PM EST
I was TDY (Moody AFB, and Avon Park, Fl) back in Nov 02 with some of the PJ's from Hurlbert Field, these guys know their shit, work hard, and more importantly play hard. I guess since they get all of the extra pay, they don't mind buying round after round of beer; which eventually contributes to the fights they pick with others. They told tales of showing up for work drunk/severe hangover and "practice" hooking each other up to the IV. They said this, (the IV)and an oxygen mask will sober you up faster than anything else.
Man, if I did shit like that, I'd get caught, a stripe pulled, and probably denied re-enlistment. My luck.
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 5:58:41 PM EST
i have had PJ's and Green Berets in ER learning and assisting..and probably working on trauma patients.

your very right..their medical training is above and beyond any others..and then they can fight out of a scrap..too.

i think its the only SOCOM..type speciality that takes any armed forces member to their ranks..

kind of cool to see jarheads along with rangers...and such.
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 7:40:24 PM EST

Originally Posted By Blue_Suiter:
I was TDY (Moody AFB, and Avon Park, Fl) back in Nov 02 with some of the PJ's from Hurlbert Field, these guys know their shit, work hard, and more importantly play hard. I guess since they get all of the extra pay, they don't mind buying round after round of beer; which eventually contributes to the fights they pick with others. They told tales of showing up for work drunk/severe hangover and "practice" hooking each other up to the IV. They said this, (the IV)and an oxygen mask will sober you up faster than anything else.
Man, if I did shit like that, I'd get caught, a stripe pulled, and probably denied re-enlistment. My luck.



LOL,

When I show up to work with a hangover I ask the PJ's if anyone would like some IV training. Hell yes it cures a hangover fast!
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 8:25:19 PM EST

Originally Posted By Wobblin-Goblin:
Good thread, folks. It's nice to be able to honor these men, even if it is in a simple discussion forum thread.



i was really impressed with these guys , but didnt know much about them.

Knew u guys would, thanx
Link Posted: 5/14/2004 2:11:40 AM EST
The PJ's, along with the AFSOC guys who transport them, have my undying respect.

I saw a flim of a rescue in Vietnam, shot from inside the Jolly Green. The helicopter is in a hover and they sent a PJ down on the cable to pick up a downed pilot. Over the intercom you can hear the winch operator giving directions to the pilot.

You could then hear rounds hitting the helicopter and the winch operator calmly saying, "Hold your hover... Hold your hover..."

These guys have HUGE ones.

I was never much of a Rambo/jock kind of guy. I remember in BMT when they came around asking if anyone wanted to try out for Pararescue. A bunch of the high school sports heroes went, then came back later with their tails between their legs. That's when I started to get an understanding of how tought the PJs are.
Link Posted: 5/14/2004 2:32:09 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/14/2004 2:49:49 AM EST

Originally Posted By Brohawk:
The PJ's, along with the AFSOC guys who transport them, have my undying respect.

I saw a flim of a rescue in Vietnam, shot from inside the Jolly Green. The helicopter is in a hover and they sent a PJ down on the cable to pick up a downed pilot. Over the intercom you can hear the winch operator giving directions to the pilot.

You could then hear rounds hitting the helicopter and the winch operator calmly saying, "Hold your hover... Hold your hover..."

These guys have HUGE ones.

I was never much of a Rambo/jock kind of guy. I remember in BMT when they came around asking if anyone wanted to try out for Pararescue. A bunch of the high school sports heroes went, then came back later with their tails between their legs. That's when I started to get an understanding of how tought the PJs are.


Good post, Bro. I enjoyed reading it.
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