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11/20/2019 5:07:11 PM
Posted: 5/13/2005 4:51:46 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/20/2005 4:34:55 PM EST by armoredsaint]
I have a 10/100 router in the basement of my house that connects to different rooms, but in my home office I want more than one connection because I have 2 computers, is it possible to use another router like a cheap linksys to have another connection in my home office? Hopefully it makes sense? Thanks

updated: thanks for those who recommended a switch, it definitely makes sense now.

Link Posted: 5/13/2005 5:38:19 PM EST
it's possible to connect a router to another router but I'm not positive which ports to use and what settings to change
Link Posted: 5/15/2005 7:09:12 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/15/2005 7:12:43 PM EST by M-Forgery]
Yes. Just plug in the new router to the data jack in your office. You will not need a crossover cable if the new router has port configuration autodetection.

Link Posted: 5/16/2005 7:09:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/17/2005 9:47:50 AM EST by Robbie]
It is possible to work with two routers, but I highly recommend against it for a home environment. Typically one computer won't connect to secure sites or some applications that connect on the internet. This is because both routers are trying to "route" information. Too many cooks in the kitchen telling the data which way to go. Double-NATing.

It can be done, but you'll likely be much happier by getting rid of the 2nd router and replacing it with an Ethernet switch which is a whopping $10-15 and there's probably a rebate on top of that. That's for a wired solution. If you already have a wired router and need a wireless connection, an access point provides the wireless part without conflicting with the router's function.

Just say no to double routers on a home network!
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 8:24:02 AM EST
Why not use a hub/switch instead?
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 5:20:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/17/2005 5:24:09 PM EST by cruze5]
exacty.... this first device needs to be the router the next device if needed can be the switch or hub... in this case since most routers have a 4 port SWITCH build in you can save a little money and just buy the hub..

edited so say: ok if the first device in your basement is a router and the cables are already run. all you have to do is plug the cable into the network card of your pc's and thats it.. if you have several computers in the same room THEN get hub, plug into the uplink port and then plug the other computers into port 1-4.


Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:
Why not use a hub/switch instead?

Link Posted: 5/19/2005 3:03:57 AM EST

Originally Posted By Robbie:
It is possible to work with two routers, but I highly recommend against it for a home environment.



+1
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 11:16:50 AM EST
Yea its very possible, that is how I used to do my network but now I got a Smoothwall then my main router. What brand of router and what model is it?

What I used to do was my ethernet cord that come from my modem into the WAN port on the back of the 1st router, then from the second port on the 1st router I would take a ethernet cord to the first port on my 2nd router. Worked like a charm and advoides the issue of double NAT. If it is a linksys they usally all have a port called Uplink that is where you would plug the cable from the first router. Also Get a switch, Hubs are not as fast because of collisions.
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 11:22:53 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 1:07:47 PM EST

Originally Posted By Archer36:
What I used to do was my ethernet cord that come from my modem into the WAN port on the back of the 1st router, then from the second port on the 1st router I would take a ethernet cord to the first port on my 2nd router. Worked like a charm and advoides the issue of double NAT.



That's creating a double-NAT situation because you have two different processors (the two routers) making decisions on which packets should be sent to which computers. It works for most types of connections, but some types will fail.
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 2:20:02 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/19/2005 2:24:07 PM EST by Archer36]

Originally Posted By Robbie:

Originally Posted By Archer36:
What I used to do was my ethernet cord that come from my modem into the WAN port on the back of the 1st router, then from the second port on the 1st router I would take a ethernet cord to the first port on my 2nd router. Worked like a charm and advoides the issue of double NAT.



That's creating a double-NAT situation because you have two different processors (the two routers) making decisions on which packets should be sent to which computers. It works for most types of connections, but some types will fail.

Ahh, but isnt the routing of the packets what makes it different from a hub? Even If I am wrong, I run a few different servers and none of them had a problem with that set up in the past. So I highly doubt you will have a problem.
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 3:36:09 PM EST
the whole purpose of a router is to "route" network traffic. it assignes ip addresses to connecting systems. you "can't" have two routers... you can disable the routing capability on one of the routers but you could save money and buy a switch instead.
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 8:54:31 PM EST

Originally Posted By Archer36:

Originally Posted By Robbie:

Originally Posted By Archer36:
What I used to do was my ethernet cord that come from my modem into the WAN port on the back of the 1st router, then from the second port on the 1st router I would take a ethernet cord to the first port on my 2nd router. Worked like a charm and advoides the issue of double NAT.



That's creating a double-NAT situation because you have two different processors (the two routers) making decisions on which packets should be sent to which computers. It works for most types of connections, but some types will fail.

Ahh, but isnt the routing of the packets what makes it different from a hub? Even If I am wrong, I run a few different servers and none of them had a problem with that set up in the past. So I highly doubt you will have a problem.



It all depends upon the types of connections you are serving and the types of connections that are being served to you. I've worked with hundreds of these where the person didn't think they'd have a problem either. (personal side note, I hate the Westel modem/router combo as it only says "modem" on the side and people buy a router and add it to their network) Most people won't have any problems at all. But a few will as they request a certain type of connection from a server. It could be something like only one of many secure web pages on the internet that they visit. Not all secure web pages are written the same, in fact, some are quite different. A VPN connection, Intuit's Quicken may fail with one financial instituion and not another. Some dedicated business software may have difficulties. I've run across many of them. But as always, it depends upon the "business needs" of what a person is doing.

It is possible to bridge two consumer based routers together to bypass those problems (or turn off the routing function in one of them). But the devices simply weren't designed to operate in that environment.
Link Posted: 5/20/2005 2:28:52 AM EST
Yea, with my linksys you could make it act as a switdch only, I think I got it now.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 2:15:06 PM EST
Do not get a hub.
Get a switch.

Hub=10BaseT, not Full Duplex, packet collisions, slow.

Switch=100BaseT, Full Duplex, switched connection,
no packet collisions, faster, and only about $30 more than a hub.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 2:51:30 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/23/2005 2:53:45 PM EST by thejokker]

Originally Posted By armoredsaint:
I have a 10/100 router in the basement of my house that connects to different rooms, but in my home office I want more than one connection because I have 2 computers, is it possible to use another router like a cheap linksys to have another connection in my home office? Hopefully it makes sense? Thanks

updated: thanks for those who recommended a switch, it definitely makes sense now.

images9.fotki.com/v183/photos/4/499657/2191125/HomeNetwork-vi.jpg


exactly. technically your 4-port router is a router (one port) with an interated 4-port switch. you can add additional switches as needed.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 8:58:00 PM EST
hehe...had another one today at work. A Westell 2100 "modem" (it says modem on the case, but the manual reveals that it's a modem/router combo) in addition to a Linksys router. The guy hooked up with some software that does a VPN type connection and couldn't connect. But he said he could connect to all his other stuff...which was browsing the web and email, etc. We turned off the routing function of the Westell and let the Linksys do the decision making and presto! it started working.
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