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Posted: 10/2/2004 5:44:43 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2004 7:06:19 PM EST by motown_steve]
In case of an emergency while I'm away from home, and I can't get back. Everything fits in a Jansport larger hiking Backpack:

- 1 Fleece Sweatshirt
- 1 Set of Long Underwear (tops and bottoms)
- 1 Writing tablet
- 3 pens
- 2 pairs of socks
- 2 pairs of boxers
- 2 teeshirts
- 1 rain poncho
- 20 Granola Bars
- 1 Boonie hat
- 50' of 3/16" nylon cord
- 1 emergency blanket
- 1 compass
- 1 Springfield Armory M6 Scout Knife
- 1 walkman radio
- 1 pair of Oakley sunglasses
- 1 Glass cup
- 1 Rayovac waterproof flashlight
- 1 extra pocketknife
- 15 extra AA batteries
- 1 bottle 100ct Asprin
- 2 toothbrushes
- 1 Asthma inhaler
- 4 lighters
- 6 books of matches
- 1 Comb
- 2 Disposal Razors
- 1 Tarus 85
- 100 Rounds of .38 Special ammo
- 1 Compass (can't believe I left that one off)
- US Army Survival Manual
- 1 roll of toilet paper

ETA:

- 1 7.62x39mm Saiga
- 200 rounds of 7.62x39mm ammo
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:46:34 PM EST
Extra fuel for the vehicle?
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:49:55 PM EST

Originally Posted By Malpaso:
Extra fuel for the vehicle?



Never really considered it. Kind of impractical to keep a full gas can in the trunk.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:53:21 PM EST
- 1 Glass cup

What's that for ???? Sample ?????



Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:53:24 PM EST
I keep some MRE's, some extra ammo..flashlight, backpack, knife and a book on survival

but thats about it.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:54:22 PM EST
I have a similar kit for my car.

Except my longarm is a cheap Winchester 1300 12 gauge.

I also have a 12V to AC/DC converter that can also charge a dead car battery.

Surefire lights and spare CR123's.

High energy food bars (400 cal per bar) instead of granola bars.

A pair of Steiner 8 X 30 Police binos.

Cheap Mickey Mouse rubber boots for floods/mud.

Light signal stick.

Compass.


Having spare clothes is a good idea on your part.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:55:18 PM EST
A Siphon to siphon gas from other vehicles is always a handy addition
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:55:59 PM EST

Originally Posted By ED_P:
A Siphon to siphon gas from other vehicles is always a handy addition




Careful don't swallow the gas.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:59:38 PM EST
don't forget

duct tape
electrical tape
baling wire

Link Posted: 10/2/2004 6:01:10 PM EST

Originally Posted By clean_cut:

Originally Posted By ED_P:
A Siphon to siphon gas from other vehicles is always a handy addition




Careful don't swallow the gas.



I've got the pump kind. Either that, or carry a breath mint and a length of garden hose.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 6:02:13 PM EST
What about a signal mirror, whistle, and most importantly WATER?
Personally, I would have multiple ways of making fire.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 6:02:34 PM EST
The siphon is a good idea. Carrying gas is impractical, since gas ages and it's a big of a danger in a collision.

I just keep my ususal day hiking pack in back. Sweater, socks, hat, a couple MREs, and the usual lighters, notebook, knife, flashlight, water, and such. You should pull it out and test the stuff once in a while. My lighters had gone bad. I'm trying a zippo with lighter fluid to see if that lasts. Since I'm a cheapskate I just have a couple garbage bags to use as a poncho or raingear if it comes to that. My objective is to be able to walk out 20 miles or rigde out a night or two if caught out.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 6:09:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By warlord:
What about a signal mirror, whistle, and most importantly WATER?
Personally, I would have multiple ways of making fire.



Bottles of water take up too much space, and water is heavy. The cup is for collecting and sterilizing water.

As for the signaling devices, I can use the emergency blanket as a reflector if necessary.

I have both matches and lighters.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 6:11:13 PM EST
Let's not forget the most basic of survival necesseties, water. Some iodine tablets or a water pump could come in handy. Since I don't understand the glass cup, I would switch it to a camping cup, the tin kind with the ceramic or whatever coating. Oh, and a sheet of plastic. A sheet of plastic and a cup could bring you water magically overnight. It could also block out the elements that are getting in through unexpected places. The plastic could even hold that water for you. Plastic is our friend.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 6:15:24 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2004 6:16:06 PM EST by ECS]
I also added a fold up sterno stove, a sterno can, water, water purification tablets, first aid kit, plastic trash bags, TP, bunch of those dehydrated meals, small candle latern, K-Bar.

To tell you the truth I think maybe I just hole up in my concrete basement
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 6:28:01 PM EST
Don't skimp on vehicle repair items. Often having the ability to fix a minor problem makes the difference between making it home and not.

Among the obvious spare belts and hoses you should also carry:

Binary epoxy: They sell a 5 minute cure stuff, comes in a syringe type tube with two chambers. Get the gell. I have used this stuff to patch damm enar anything you could imagine.

Fuilds.. enough to replace all that the vehicle needs.

Wire.... lots of wire, electrical and some bailing wire. Schematic of the vehicle.

Wire ties- zip strips

Quality duct tape

Link Posted: 10/2/2004 6:37:14 PM EST
You need a collapsible shovel, like the one Glock makes. Very useful tool. Also a lantern that has one of the spring loaded candles inside. One will provide enough heat in a vehicle to keep you from freezing in most conditions. 2 way radio like the ones motorola makes.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 6:54:24 PM EST
I have one of those three day food packages that the Coast Guard uses. I also keep alot of my camping gear handy (Tent, sleeping bag, water filter and camping stove)


The ONE thing that I would definitely add to your list:

Toilet Paper
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 7:43:19 PM EST

Originally Posted By mcgredo:
You should pull it out and test the stuff once in a while. My lighters had gone bad. I'm trying a zippo with lighter fluid to see if that lasts.



I'll save you the time. Here in AZ my zippo goes dry faster than a 65 year old woman. A butane light seams to work best for me.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 7:47:15 PM EST
question?

Should I keep the ammunition in my trunk in some kind of small fire safe. Like a small office safe you can get at wal-mart for $20.

I have always wondered what would happen if there were a fire and those round were just lying in a box in the trunk? Would a safe make it any better?

9MM and .556

?
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 7:51:51 PM EST

Originally Posted By Gartchen:
question?

Should I keep the ammunition in my trunk in some kind of small fire safe. Like a small office safe you can get at wal-mart for $20.

I have always wondered what would happen if there were a fire and those round were just lying in a box in the trunk? Would a safe make it any better?

9MM and .556

?



Ammo will cook off, but its not really a big deal.

I worry more about aeresol cans when im fighting a fire than ammo.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 7:56:44 PM EST
gratzi!
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 8:08:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By Garand_Shooter:

Originally Posted By Gartchen:
question?

Should I keep the ammunition in my trunk in some kind of small fire safe. Like a small office safe you can get at wal-mart for $20.

I have always wondered what would happen if there were a fire and those round were just lying in a box in the trunk? Would a safe make it any better?

9MM and .556

?



Ammo will cook off, but its not really a big deal.

I worry more about aeresol cans when im fighting a fire than ammo.




Affirmative. Forget all the urban legends.

I remember reading an article in some gun rag where they did some fire tests on various ammo. The results were conclusive: either the primer blew out (minor projectile danger) or the brass just ruptured. Makes sense if you think about it.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 9:30:00 PM EST

Originally Posted By motown_steve:

Originally Posted By warlord:
What about a signal mirror, whistle, and most importantly WATER?
Personally, I would have multiple ways of making fire.



Bottles of water take up too much space, and water is heavy. The cup is for collecting and sterilizing water.

As for the signaling devices, I can use the emergency blanket as a reflector if necessary.

I have both matches and lighters.



When you live in Nevada, or in the Southwest for that matter, water is NEVER too heavy, nor will it ever take up too much space...... several 100 oz. BlackHawk or CamelBak bladders can be placed out of the way, and they can be carried in your pack when you hit the trail to civilization.

Five basic rules of the desert:

1) H20

2) Headcover

3) Summer (move by night)

4) Winter (move by day)

5) Signalling device
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:18:24 AM EST
Our big concern here is the occasional blizzard. Oct 97 we had some folks stuck in there cars about 10-20 miles east of town because of blowing snow.

I'd add one of the little D-Cell strobe lights you can duck tape to your antenna to show your position. This will allow the SUSV/Hummvees to find you and the snow plows to avoid you.

Deck of cards or small travel games are also good.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:33:57 AM EST
leatherman(dump the pocket knife)
duck tape
LESS AA bats
MORE TP
med kit
motor oil, other car essentials--fix-a-flat?
wheres the TOOTHPASTE?????
flares, to see the bad guys, start fires, signal for help
h_2_o
extra socks, less pens
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:37:26 AM EST
Entrenching tool, hatchet, wireless laptop with pedal-powered generator to surf ARf during shtf and give on-the-spot reports.

Kharn
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:41:26 AM EST

Originally Posted By motown_steve:
In case of an emergency while I'm away from home, and I can't get back. Everything fits in a Jansport larger hiking Backpack:

- 1 Fleece Sweatshirt
- 1 Set of Long Underwear (tops and bottoms)
- 1 Writing tablet
-



SNIP


Nothing you carry will be worth a damn if it all burns up how bout a
GOOD fire extinguisher

5# size set you back $30-50


Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:25:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/3/2004 8:38:51 AM EST by gamesniper]
Entrenching tool, GAZ stove
hatchet, small fuel canister
Wyoming saw, 2 ea 9 hour candles
3 legged stool, Alpenflage poncho
fleece lined, windproof jacket, SPACE blanket
strike anywhere matches, 2 full-sized Bic lighters
Trioxane fuel tabs (6), 3/8" X 16" TyWraps
100Ft Mule tape, 100ft parachute cord
tools (includes flat repair kit), heavy duty tow straps
insect repellent, toilet paper
small Sony radio, 1 pair wool fingertip gloves
1 pair full finger wool gloves, 1 pair unlined pigskin gloves
1 pair lined elkskin gloves various maps of local wilderness areas
Arizona Gazeteer (shows all the forest roads), extra anit freeze/coolant
2 large cans of Fix-A-Flat, 1 gallon drinking water
water purification tabs, extra quart of oil
quart of rear end/tranny gear oil, first aid kit w/snakebite kit
hand held aerial flares (2), 1 ea. 2 "D" cell Maglite
1 ea 2 "AA" Maglite, Multi lantern (regular flashlight, flourescent lamp, emergency flashing lights), industrial sized tire pressure guage
6' X 6' tarp, trailer hitch 2" ball, extra 1 7/8" ball
fire extinguisher,

YES, belive it or not, between behind my seat and in a tote (20" X 20" X 24") I carry in the bed of the truck I haul all this shit around with me 100% of the time. Once before we were talking about this kind of thing and I mentioned I carry too much to list. Someone asked me to and I didn't feel like it. Well, I decided to list it all this time.

And I do not have an extended cab truck. Behind the seat of my truck is LOADED with stuff and the seat is almost spring-loaded latched in place.

If I'm going up north in the winter I add a set of tire chains (4WD and chains KICKS ASS), a blanket, leather boots, gaiters, wool socks and polypro liners, wool tuke, Gore-Tex parka and windproof overpants.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:11:14 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:54:18 AM EST
tagged for home
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 10:13:45 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 11:29:26 AM EST
Great ideas here!!

I carry water in old Pepsi 2 liter plastic bottles. They seem more durable than milk jugs; plus they store a bit easier for me.

While a container actually filled with gas isn’t a good idea, having an empty gas container is. Just don’t fill it until things go bad. Also, if you’ve got a siphon, you’re going to need something to siphon the gas into!!

While certainly not a necessity, a few wet wipes can really be nice to have around.

Ammo doesn’t handle extended exposure to heat very well. I think keeping large amounts in a trunk for several months (or years) is a bad idea. I suggest keeping a small amount in the trunk, rotate it out periodically (by shooting it!), and have a larger amount set aside at home.

I’d definitely go with a better first aid kit.

Anybody mention a basic firearms cleaning kit yet?
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 11:36:04 AM EST
This type of thing is oft discussed on the arfcom survival forum. Stop by and check it out.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 12:24:57 PM EST
Why am I the only one mentioning toilet paper? It's the Duct Tape of paper goods. Not only can you wipe your ass with it, you can dry your hands, clean your windows, clean your face, blow your nose, Check your oil/tranny fluid, even use it to write notes.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 12:30:44 PM EST
FLARES. I know they've been previously mentioned, but you have to have flares in the back of your car. I have learned this the hard way.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 2:49:04 PM EST
Geez, you guys pretty much have it covered but you forgot the Trunk Monkey
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 2:55:59 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 2:57:35 PM EST
I just keep this in the back of my ford ranger, "just in case".
trunk kit
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