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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 4/22/2016 1:39:31 PM EST
My photo bucket needs and upgrade, can someone fetch and post the picture please?

Not securing the load, but damn he had to go from 60-0 in 2 seconds I would think.

FB link
https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1034883116594020&id=498435820238755

Also on the same site.
Hell on earth refinery explosion.
See the people running, the absolute "oh shit" moment of fear had to be off the scale.
https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1034302129985452&id=498435820238755
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 1:41:52 PM EST


Link Posted: 4/22/2016 1:46:20 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/22/2016 1:46:53 PM EST by Magnus357]
The company I'm working with now had to move some major pipe for two offshore projects from Port of Houston area to the Corpus Christi area.

It was 184 miles of pipe. 8" and 10" OD with wall thickness of 1 - 1.5". That's nearly a million feet of pipe. Over 2,000 truck loads.

Once it dawned on people on the project how serious this was, we worked to upgrade all the trucks we would be using to have reinforced cab protection and employed people just to ensure the loads were correctly tied down and instituted a major safety program that included all the drivers and loadout teams.

We did it just because of this reason.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 1:51:31 PM EST
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 1:51:32 PM EST
Driver paid for his mistake with his life.

Securing cargo is not something to halfass.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 1:55:53 PM EST
I saw a mobile drill rig that ran into a ditch. The drill rods went right thru the cab. Looked like a howitzer used it for target practice.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 1:57:19 PM EST
That's a load off his mind.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:05:58 PM EST
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Originally Posted By BadMonk:
Driver paid for his mistake with his life.

Securing cargo is not something to halfass.
View Quote

Did someone else secure it for him?

Did he not check?
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:06:33 PM EST
Where else is the pipe supposed to go?
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:10:12 PM EST
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Originally Posted By GreenBastard:

Did someone else secure it for him?

Did he not check?
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Originally Posted By GreenBastard:
Originally Posted By BadMonk:
Driver paid for his mistake with his life.

Securing cargo is not something to halfass.

Did someone else secure it for him?

Did he not check?


Many times with loads such as the one in this incident, securing it against all odds isn't possible. I'm not sure you could apply enough load in the vertical direction to restrain that equipment in the horizontal direction. There just isn't enough friction. He needed a reinforced cab protector.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:12:29 PM EST
I thought DOT required a cab protector, either trailer or tractor mounted, for any such cargo?

Kharn

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:15:23 PM EST


Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:17:26 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Furyataurus:
That's a load off his mind.
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You just had to ram that pun in.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:24:07 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Magnus357:


Many times with loads such as the one in this incident, securing it against all odds isn't possible. I'm not sure you could apply enough load in the vertical direction to restrain that equipment in the horizontal direction. There just isn't enough friction. He needed a reinforced cab protector.
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Originally Posted By Magnus357:
Originally Posted By GreenBastard:
Originally Posted By BadMonk:
Driver paid for his mistake with his life.

Securing cargo is not something to halfass.

Did someone else secure it for him?

Did he not check?


Many times with loads such as the one in this incident, securing it against all odds isn't possible. I'm not sure you could apply enough load in the vertical direction to restrain that equipment in the horizontal direction. There just isn't enough friction. He needed a reinforced cab protector.


It's the driver's responsibility to make sure it's secured properly and from what all the flatbed truckers I've seen say is that straps for steel is a huge nogo.

Special Rule for Special Purpose Vehicles Generally, the basic rules concerning the minimum number of tiedowns do not apply to a vehicle transporting one or more articles of cargo such as, but not limited to, machinery or fabricated structural items (e.g., steel or concrete beams, crane booms, girders, and trusses, etc.) which, because of their design, size, shape or weight, must be fastened by special methods. However, any article of cargo carried on that vehicle must be secured adequately to the vehicle by devices that are capable of meeting the performance requirements and the working load limit requirements.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:24:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/22/2016 2:26:22 PM EST by squarles67]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Kharn:
I thought DOT required a cab protector, either trailer or tractor mounted, for any such cargo?

Kharn

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
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It's not required but if a header board is not present you must use extra tiedowns in the front.

ETA: That load needed chains, not straps
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:27:33 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/22/2016 2:31:31 PM EST by lizARdman15]
That's why you call those huge rolls of steel that are lined up to roll front to rear on the back of a flat bed...

suicide rolls.

I used to drive for a company that hauled big rolls of aluminum to a can plant beside a Coca-cola bottler. They would load us at Alcoa in TN with 3 rolls that weighed between 45-48,000 lbs total. The rolls were rolled vertical on a pallet. 1 big one at the front of the trailer and 2 slightly smaller at the rear over the axles. The only way to secure the load was by nailing 2x4s on the floor around the pallet.

If you slammed the brakes, the rear ones would break free and hit the front one like a pinball. It would slide right out the front of the trailer. If a lot of speed was involved, it would come into the cab. If not, it would fall into the gap between the truck and trailer.

Over the many years that the company operated, I think 2 drivers died and many trucks/trailers were destroyed by this happening. And that was one small trucking company

Even doing everything right, it is easy to die when pulling freight. Driving a truck is long, boring, monotonous, dangerous work with little respect from the people that drive around them.

ETA: How much would you like to bet that a car pulled out in front of him and made him slam on the brakes to cause this to happen. I didnt read the story, but I am guessing.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:33:10 PM EST
Damn, what a way to go.

Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:35:47 PM EST
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:39:15 PM EST
This is why trucks get headache racks.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:40:22 PM EST
I have seen that more than once here. There is a company that used to haul pipe from the rail yard to their pipe yard. Every year or so one guy would get the bright idea not to belly wrap his load and it would either come through the cab or break the straps and end up on the road.

I don't think anyone ever died though. It was usually under 40mph when it happened.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:41:03 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Cole2534:
This is why trucks get headache racks.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
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Originally Posted By Cole2534:
This is why trucks get headache racks.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile

Originally Posted By Kharn:
I thought DOT required a cab protector, either trailer or tractor mounted, for any such cargo?

Kharn

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile

Not that I've seen. We have quite a few OTR trucks pull up on site loaded with pipe and no headache rack.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:42:34 PM EST
The whole thing shifted.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:46:08 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By lizARdman15:
That's why you call those huge rolls of steel that are lined up to roll front to rear on the back of a flat bed...

suicide rolls.

I used to drive for a company that hauled big rolls of aluminum to a can plant beside a Coca-cola bottler. They would load us at Alcoa in TN with 3 rolls that weighed between 45-48,000 lbs total. The rolls were rolled vertical on a pallet. 1 big one at the front of the trailer and 2 slightly smaller at the rear over the axles. The only way to secure the load was by nailing 2x4s on the floor around the pallet.

If you slammed the brakes, the rear ones would break free and hit the front one like a pinball. It would slide right out the front of the trailer. If a lot of speed was involved, it would come into the cab. If not, it would fall into the gap between the truck and trailer.

Over the many years that the company operated, I think 2 drivers died and many trucks/trailers were destroyed by this happening. And that was one small trucking company

Even doing everything right, it is easy to die when pulling freight. Driving a truck is long, boring, monotonous, dangerous work with little respect from the people that drive around them.

ETA: How much would you like to bet that a car pulled out in front of him and made him slam on the brakes to cause this to happen. I didnt read the story, but I am guessing.
View Quote


The article describes this as a single-vehicle accident, so there was something that caused the drive to hit his brakes hard. I hope he had a dashcam that caught what happened so that the driver's family doesn't think that their loved one was so stupid as to hit the brakes and cause this to happen for no reason.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:49:06 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Cole2534:
This is why trucks get headache racks.

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I don't think those thin ass racks will stop that.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 2:52:07 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By lizARdman15:
That's why you call those huge rolls of steel that are lined up to roll front to rear on the back of a flat bed...

suicide rolls.

I used to drive for a company that hauled big rolls of aluminum to a can plant beside a Coca-cola bottler. They would load us at Alcoa in TN with 3 rolls that weighed between 45-48,000 lbs total. The rolls were rolled vertical on a pallet. 1 big one at the front of the trailer and 2 slightly smaller at the rear over the axles. The only way to secure the load was by nailing 2x4s on the floor around the pallet.

If you slammed the brakes, the rear ones would break free and hit the front one like a pinball. It would slide right out the front of the trailer. If a lot of speed was involved, it would come into the cab. If not, it would fall into the gap between the truck and trailer.

Over the many years that the company operated, I think 2 drivers died and many trucks/trailers were destroyed by this happening. And that was one small trucking company

Even doing everything right, it is easy to die when pulling freight. Driving a truck is long, boring, monotonous, dangerous work with little respect from the people that drive around them.

ETA: How much would you like to bet that a car pulled out in front of him and made him slam on the brakes to cause this to happen. I didnt read the story, but I am guessing.
View Quote

I bet he was TEXTING...
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 3:01:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/22/2016 3:02:25 PM EST by Cole2534]
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Originally Posted By louisianarebel:

I don't think those thin ass racks will stop that.
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Originally Posted By louisianarebel:
Originally Posted By Cole2534:
This is why trucks get headache racks.

I don't think those thin ass racks will stop that.

I bet this style would-



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Link Posted: 4/22/2016 3:05:45 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Magnus357:
The company I'm working with now had to move some major pipe for two offshore projects from Port of Houston area to the Corpus Christi area.

It was 184 miles of pipe. 8" and 10" OD with wall thickness of 1 - 1.5". That's nearly a million feet of pipe. Over 2,000 truck loads.

Once it dawned on people on the project how serious this was, we worked to upgrade all the trucks we would be using to have reinforced cab protection and employed people just to ensure the loads were correctly tied down and instituted a major safety program that included all the drivers and loadout teams.

We did it just because of this reason.
View Quote



Not trying to be a dick, but did anyone consider moving that by rail? Or was it just not possible to move it close enough then truck?

2K truck loads is a lot of moving.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 3:08:34 PM EST
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Originally Posted By BadMonk:
Securing cargo is not something to halfass.
View Quote


No it isn't... I remember in the 90's in the Chicago area a driver leaving a steel mill over by the lake with 2 17k lbs rolls of steel, having one come off on I-80 at speed... and it continued to roll a ways... and over several cars.

Securing a load is a life or death proposition.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 3:12:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/22/2016 3:13:39 PM EST by louisianarebel]
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Originally Posted By Cole2534:

I bet this style would-

http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTE5NVgxNjAw/z/PZ8AAOSwu1VW3zRc/$_1.JPG?set_id=880000500F

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Originally Posted By Cole2534:
Originally Posted By louisianarebel:
Originally Posted By Cole2534:
This is why trucks get headache racks.

I don't think those thin ass racks will stop that.

I bet this style would-

http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTE5NVgxNjAw/z/PZ8AAOSwu1VW3zRc/$_1.JPG?set_id=880000500F

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile

Doubt it. You can't really stop that much steel with something just bolted to the frame of a truck. I never see any that are built very heavy, just aluminum.


Best bet would be a trailer with it built in then one on the truck.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 3:13:24 PM EST
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 3:24:55 PM EST
OP's post is the very reason why all my trucks have headboards on them, even the ones that don't normally carry loads that are likely to shift in an impact.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 3:41:40 PM EST
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Originally Posted By guntrk:

I bet he was TEXTING...
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Originally Posted By guntrk:
Originally Posted By lizARdman15:
That's why you call those huge rolls of steel that are lined up to roll front to rear on the back of a flat bed...

suicide rolls.

I used to drive for a company that hauled big rolls of aluminum to a can plant beside a Coca-cola bottler. They would load us at Alcoa in TN with 3 rolls that weighed between 45-48,000 lbs total. The rolls were rolled vertical on a pallet. 1 big one at the front of the trailer and 2 slightly smaller at the rear over the axles. The only way to secure the load was by nailing 2x4s on the floor around the pallet.

If you slammed the brakes, the rear ones would break free and hit the front one like a pinball. It would slide right out the front of the trailer. If a lot of speed was involved, it would come into the cab. If not, it would fall into the gap between the truck and trailer.

Over the many years that the company operated, I think 2 drivers died and many trucks/trailers were destroyed by this happening. And that was one small trucking company

Even doing everything right, it is easy to die when pulling freight. Driving a truck is long, boring, monotonous, dangerous work with little respect from the people that drive around them.

ETA: How much would you like to bet that a car pulled out in front of him and made him slam on the brakes to cause this to happen. I didnt read the story, but I am guessing.

I bet he was TEXTING...


I am not saying that truckers are not capable of stupid and dangerous behavior, BUT I have also found that a lot of big rig wrecks are caused by cars.

It could very well have been that a car pulled out in front of him and he "had" to slam on brakes to avoid the accident. The car may not have even realized what it did and is long gone. The other option was to drive thru the "likely" car and the guy did not want to kill them and had hoped his load would be secure. What if it was a dog or a kid that ran out. I would hope that any decent person would stop to at least report the accident.

Let me also add, though, that the driver not securing his load is entirely his own fault. However, let me also add that it could have been well secured and just broke free. Chains may have been better for tying it down, but it is possible that there was a reason straps were used(client or company policy issue). You can't possibly get a strap tight enough on a heavy load and the slightest movement could easily have popped the straps that sent the load into the cab.

Either way, it sucks for the guy. I am 44 and I would hate to know that my family did not have me around because of a tragic work accident.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 3:43:04 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Magnus357:


Many times with loads such as the one in this incident, securing it against all odds isn't possible. I'm not sure you could apply enough load in the vertical direction to restrain that equipment in the horizontal direction. There just isn't enough friction. He needed a reinforced cab protector.
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Originally Posted By Magnus357:
Originally Posted By GreenBastard:
Originally Posted By BadMonk:
Driver paid for his mistake with his life.

Securing cargo is not something to halfass.

Did someone else secure it for him?

Did he not check?


Many times with loads such as the one in this incident, securing it against all odds isn't possible. I'm not sure you could apply enough load in the vertical direction to restrain that equipment in the horizontal direction. There just isn't enough friction. He needed a reinforced cab protector.

Hauling steel like that is a real bitch. Difficult to get enough tension into the holddown straps or chains to create enough friction to keep the load in place.

It's just not possible to secure a load to survive a crash, most times. If this happened just under braking, then load was not secure enough. If the truck hit something, then all bets are off. Legal requirement is tiedown devices have to be strong enough to handle 60% of the load weight. In other words, strong enough to handle 0.60 G load, which is greater than stopping and cornering capability of a truck.
As mentioned, if the dunnage compressed under load and/or vibration, then tiedowns are not providing enough friction, allowing the steel to slide. A headache rack on the tractor, or headboard on the trailer probably would not have helped much, because unless the steel is tight against the headboard to eliminate motion, once that shit starts moving, the momentum will punch it through most anything.

Again, tiedowns are only to keep the load in place under normal operating conditions, such as stopping and cornering - not in a wreck situation.
Please think of this, before pulling into that 'stopping zone' in front of a big truck. That driver is leaving that space for him, not you.

Link Posted: 4/22/2016 3:50:46 PM EST
Originally Posted By Marlboroman79:
My photo bucket needs and upgrade, can someone fetch and post the picture please?

Not securing the load, but damn he had to go from 60-0 in 2 seconds I would think.

FB link
https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1034883116594020&id=498435820238755

Also on the same site.
Hell on earth refinery explosion.
See the people running, the absolute "oh shit" moment of fear had to be off the scale.
https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1034302129985452&id=498435820238755
View Quote


Oh man! That refinery explosion was horrific!
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 3:59:36 PM EST
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Link Posted: 4/22/2016 6:55:07 PM EST
When my dad owned his own tractor and flatbed trailer a while back I swear a headache rack was required if you hauled a flatbed without it's own bulkhead. Apparently the law has since been changed. Probably wouldn't have made much difference anyways.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 7:00:16 PM EST
Thats sad to see. Bad shit can happen when trucking, but there are a lot of things one can do to make it "less bad".
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