Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
Posted: 9/29/2004 6:45:53 AM EST

Got a new F-150 and was wondering what brand of cap to put over the bed. I don't like the low covers or lids, but a full cap with windows. Had a Hop Cap before and it was fine, looks like ACE is a big brand name now.

Also on a liner, I've been happy with just a rubber mat. What do y'all think of the sprayed-on Rhino liners? I'm leaning towards just a mat.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 6:50:30 AM EST
I have and ARE cap on my '98 F-150. Top quality.

I have a plastic Ford bedliner. If I had it to do over, I would have a Line-X in the back. At 120,000 miles now, what's the point?
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 6:51:20 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2004 6:52:01 AM EST by cyanide]
Try ARE

www.4are.com/
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 6:53:30 AM EST
I have a hard shell tonneau so can't help with the caps but I have a Rhino lining and love it. It's great, very durable. Can't comment on how the sun does on it though because I've had the tonneau on it since it dried.

If you get one, ensure they mask it straight. Mine's well done, but it's a little crooked in a couple of spots, really you have to look closely.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 7:23:47 AM EST
When I bought my '02 F-150 extended cab I had the Rhino Liner sprayed in and a SnugTop Xtra Vision cap installed.
www.snugtop.com/p_xv.htm

I'm very happy with both and next year when I sell my truck for a new one I will definately do the same thing again.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 7:28:51 AM EST
I have a Rhino liner, but I'd just as soon bought a Line-X. Either one will work well. I think the Line-X is a closer fit and harder. The Rhino works well and definitely has a non skid surface. No complaints here. I bought an Extang tonneau cover. It fits well, but I'd never deal with them again.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 7:35:27 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2004 7:36:54 AM EST by DriftPunch]
I've got both. I've got an ARE and a pendaliner for my '94 K1500. The benefits of a spray on tend to go away with a shell, as it's out of the weather and moisture doesn't really get under the liner.

Drop in liners used to go over the rails of the bed. Now they don't and if you want that it's a separate component. The move to doing this was good, as with the old type (like I have) the bed size was effectivly reduced as the liner didn't 'tuck in' under the bed rails. The new ones do. However, heed this advice: DO NOT COVER YOUR BED RAILS WITH A PLASTIC LINER if you are going to install a shell. The shells are designed to fit the bed contour exactly. The drop in will change the dimensions slightly. Spray on will too, but to a much smaller degree. My shell doesn't fit my bed right because of my over the rail liner. I've used a couple of layers of gasket tape over the entire footprint to assist in filling the changed contours.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 7:39:48 AM EST
I have a rhino liner in my Tacoma. No complaints so far. I hear many good things about Line-X as well. I think you would be happy with either one.

Definitely shop around, though. When I was looking to get the rhino, I found huge differences in price from one place to the next...as much as $150.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 7:43:35 AM EST
How much does a Rhino cost, alltogether.

Also thanks for the corrections it's A.R.E. not ACE as I posted.

I'm still leaning towards the rubber mat, since I'll have a cap over it. Mainly for the non-skid. But keep 'em coming.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 7:46:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By JCKnife:
How much does a Rhino cost, alltogether.

Also thanks for the corrections it's A.R.E. not ACE as I posted.

I'm still leaning towards the rubber mat, since I'll have a cap over it. Mainly for the non-skid. But keep 'em coming.


I had a rubber mat in my first truck. It will start to decay in time and put black marks on everything. If you go that way, consider it a long wearing disposable and be ready to replace it when that starts.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 7:49:50 AM EST

Originally Posted By DriftPunch:

I had a rubber mat in my first truck. It will start to decay in time and put black marks on everything. If you go that way, consider it a long wearing disposable and be ready to replace it when that starts.



Wow, the one I just traded in lasted 7 years with no problems (except where I spilled gas on it).
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 7:56:40 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2004 7:57:15 AM EST by bnred9]
Second vote for ARE! I put a LSII Series hard tonneau cover on my 2000 Ford SuperDuty in the spring of 2000. This has been a great top that keeps thing out of view.


ARE
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 7:57:14 AM EST
I'm also curious what a spay-in is costing these days.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 9:34:30 AM EST
Don't use those plastic drop ins . The scuff the paint , trap moisture and cause the bed to rust out .
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 9:40:43 AM EST
I've got a Rugged Liner in my truck and the thing is tougher than fucking nails. In fact, a 9MM Ranger 147gr HP from close range (3 1/2ft) will not penetrate it. Don't ask how I know.

The only drawback is that when it's wet, it's slicker than snot on Sundays. (or any other day, for that matter).

Don't know what it cost, as it was installed on the truck when I bought it.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 9:46:55 AM EST
Try these guys...

http://www.rhinolinings.com/
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 9:47:47 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2004 9:49:23 AM EST by Lightning_P38]
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 9:51:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By norman74:
I'm also curious what a spay-in is costing these days.


My long bed Dodge Ram, with coverage up on top of the bed rails, cost somewhere in the area of $460. (Line-X)
Top Top