Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
PSA
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 12/14/2013 1:26:39 PM EDT
and no let's not get Hank Jr. involved in this, he was talking about something else.





I come from a Swedish background on my fathers side, English and Dutch and my mother's. And we have a dish that has been made for as long as I can remember for Christmas that all of us love and will fight each other over for the last scraps.  But it is from Scotland. WTF? How does that fit into the family tree?  I mean there is no way we'll give it up but I have to wonder if great grandma (came from that side) was doing a scotsman at some point in time?





Anyway the dish I'm talking about is called finnan haddie. Anybody else have that on their annual Christmas menu?  I found a scotsman master smoker here in the US that I can get it from without importing it. I guarantee you won't find it at a local grocer no matter how big they are





But I'm curious,  are there other regional or otherwise seemingly unusual dishes that are traditionally served at your family holidays that I might not know about?





And you southerners better not say grits. Or Hank why do you drink?

 
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 5:55:13 PM EDT
so I really am weird.  Everybody really does eat pizza and hot dogs or (if you aren't christian) americanized chinese food? Or if you are southern maybe eggs and grits with some bacon if you're lucky? Hell, I don't know. I was just curious what people traditionally eat for the holidays.



I guess I should weigh on on the thread killer thread and win my prize. (I hope it is a major award!)
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 5:58:49 PM EDT
We make and eat tamales but that's pretty common around these parts.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 6:30:44 PM EDT


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Miracle_Pants:



We make and eat tamales but that's pretty common around these parts.
View Quote
Well that's a start.





I remember one christmas i got stuck with my brother way out in nowhere (sort of close to Uvalde as I recall) by our tool pusher because the Texas boys we worked with could actually get home to family and he figured we had our own family and we could watch the rig while everybody else was gone.  In reality he was correct because he left us with a gallon of Jack Daniels and our own devices and we made a christmas tree out of a mesquite tree in the house and a rattlesnack hide we were trying to dry out that we wrapped around it and some cow pies for ornaments (it was a big cattle ranch).  They left the house full of food too so that wasn't a problem. Don't remember for sure but I think we had canned ham on Christmas (we might have also been tipsy).





Tamales certainly would have worked too.
 
 
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 6:46:02 PM EDT
Another thing I doubt is all that unusual; my mother would make Bisquick sausage balls for Christmas morning.



I'm not sure what the original recipe calls for but she'd get the spiciest sausage and the sharpest cheddar she could find for them. It was hard to stop eating them.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 6:52:58 PM EDT
Brunswick stew and pimento cheese sandwiches on Christmas Eve
Breakfast casserole, deer sausage, grits and eggs on Christmas morning.

Link Posted: 12/14/2013 7:11:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/14/2013 7:14:08 PM EDT by fishorwife]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Miracle_Pants:
Another thing I doubt is all that unusual; my mother would make Bisquick sausage balls for Christmas morning.

I'm not sure what the original recipe calls for but she'd get the spiciest sausage and the sharpest cheddar she could find for them. It was hard to stop eating them.
View Quote


1 pound of spicy bulk sausage
2 cups bisquick
1 cup sharp cheddar cheese shredded.  

Mix all ingredients together and make small balls about the diameter  of a 50 cent piece.
Bake at 350 for 20 minutes.

You can add more sausage if you like.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 7:11:41 PM EDT
Lots and lots of pizzelles. And potica.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 7:12:19 PM EDT
My folks have always had Swedish food on Christmas Eve: Meatballs, rice pudding, herring, baked beans, Aquavit, Farmer's cheese.. Stuff like that. Mom comes from German/Swedish immigrant stock, and many of the foods from her upbringing are featured around Christmas.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 7:13:06 PM EDT
I had a  Stollen today. If you are German decent you will know the goodness.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 7:33:38 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sgt_Fish:


Brunswick stew and pimento cheese sandwiches on Christmas Eve

Breakfast casserole, deer sausage, grits and eggs on Christmas morning.



View Quote
I've heard about Brunswick stew and I've heard it's good. but I don't think I've ever had it. Would any old internet recipe work or is there a secret to it? I'd be interested in trying to make it.



 
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 7:37:22 PM EDT
Here in Lousiana we can't have turkey without out rice dressing. The dressing is made from ground meat, chicken gizzards and livers, seasonings and rice.



Made correctly it is delicious!
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 7:43:08 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gomulego:
I've heard about Brunswick stew and I've heard it's good. but I don't think I've ever had it. Would any old internet recipe work or is there a secret to it? I'd be interested in trying to make it.
 
View Quote


I actually just picked up a "family cookbook" with submissions from a bunch of different branches of my family, and the name Brunswick Stew jumped out at me, so I dug through and sure enough found a recipe for the stuff.    I haven't tried this yet, so feel free to let me know if it's any good.  

Grandma Brown's Brunswick Stew

Day 1
2 large frying chickens or 5-6 lbs hen
3 lbs sirloin tip roast
4-5 lbs pork loin roast

Cook chicken and meats the day before making stew.  Save stock, place in fridge.  Skim fat from stock and discard.  Remove chicken and meat from bones and tear into strips.

1 small bag dry lima beans
10 lbs potatoes, peeled and cubed
2 lbs onions, peeled and sliced

Soak dry lima beans in cold water overnight.  Before making stew, cook beans.  Mash and make into paste.  Cook potatoes and onions with reserved meat stock until tender in a roaster.  Mash the potatoes, leaving them lumpy.  

Day 2

2 cans lima beans, drained
2 cans cream style white corn
1 small bottle ketchup
1/2 bottle Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
Salt and Pepper to taste

Add all of the ingredients above to the broth, potatoes, onions, chicken and meats.

8 large cans tomatoes

Crush tomatoes and add to stew.  Stew for 30 minutes to an hour or as Grandma used to say "until it looks like Brunswick stew".

Link Posted: 12/14/2013 7:47:46 PM EDT
Homemade Ravioli ( meat and cheese) and leg of Lamb is always our Christmas dinner.... along with the usual accompaniments ..... salad, homemade bread, good wines, etc.

Over the holidays we enjoy smoked cheeses and fish, homemade venison sausage ( smoked and fresh ), all kinds of mustards, collard greens, hams, etc.,  my wife is an excellent baker and we have to many different cookies, pumpkin roles, candies, cakes, pies etc. to list.

Sauerkraut and Pork,  kielbasa, mashed potatoes, beet horseradish, etc. is always New Years Day dinner.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 7:49:14 PM EDT
We’re German English. 3rd gen on my moms side. We cook typical American fare with our twist. Smoked ham, smoked turkey & garlic crusted rib roast. We make my grandmothers pimento & cream cheese mashed potatoes, stuffing and green beans with bacon & vinegar. Cheese cake & cobbler.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 7:50:22 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Miracle_Pants:
We make and eat tamales but that's pretty common around these parts.
View Quote



This
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 7:54:17 PM EDT
At our family gatherings, you will always find an appetizer plate of Trail bologna, and cheese. It's a regional Amish sausage made in Holmes county, Ohio, in the village of Trail. It's not distributed outside of Ohio. It's so localized that my friends in the northwest part of the state have never heard of it. A similar sausage would be Lebanon bologna, from Lebanon, Pa. It's served in bite sized slices or chunks, with similar sized pieces of cheese.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 7:55:15 PM EDT
I LOVE finnan haddie.  There is one restaurant that does it and cornbread really well in Buzzard's Bay, MA.  It is incredibly difficult to find, though.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 8:02:32 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 74novaman:
I actually just picked up a "family cookbook" with submissions from a bunch of different branches of my family, and the name Brunswick Stew jumped out at me, so I dug through and sure enough found a recipe for the stuff.    I haven't tried this yet, so feel free to let me know if it's any good.  



Grandma Brown's Brunswick Stew



Day 1

2 large frying chickens or 5-6 lbs hen

3 lbs sirloin tip roast

4-5 lbs pork loin roast



Cook chicken and meats the day before making stew.  Save stock, place in fridge.  Skim fat from stock and discard.  Remove chicken and meat from bones and tear into strips.



1 small bag dry lima beans

10 lbs potatoes, peeled and cubed

2 lbs onions, peeled and sliced



Soak dry lima beans in cold water overnight.  Before making stew, cook beans.  Mash and make into paste.  Cook potatoes and onions with reserved meat stock until tender in a roaster.  Mash the potatoes, leaving them lumpy.  



Day 2



2 cans lima beans, drained

2 cans cream style white corn

1 small bottle ketchup

1/2 bottle Worcestershire sauce

1 teaspoon crushed red pepper

Salt and Pepper to taste



Add all of the ingredients above to the broth, potatoes, onions, chicken and meats.



8 large cans tomatoes



Crush tomatoes and add to stew.  Stew for 30 minutes to an hour or as Grandma used to say "until it looks like Brunswick stew".



View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 74novaman:



Originally Posted By gomulego:

I've heard about Brunswick stew and I've heard it's good. but I don't think I've ever had it. Would any old internet recipe work or is there a secret to it? I'd be interested in trying to make it.

 




I actually just picked up a "family cookbook" with submissions from a bunch of different branches of my family, and the name Brunswick Stew jumped out at me, so I dug through and sure enough found a recipe for the stuff.    I haven't tried this yet, so feel free to let me know if it's any good.  



Grandma Brown's Brunswick Stew



Day 1

2 large frying chickens or 5-6 lbs hen

3 lbs sirloin tip roast

4-5 lbs pork loin roast



Cook chicken and meats the day before making stew.  Save stock, place in fridge.  Skim fat from stock and discard.  Remove chicken and meat from bones and tear into strips.



1 small bag dry lima beans

10 lbs potatoes, peeled and cubed

2 lbs onions, peeled and sliced



Soak dry lima beans in cold water overnight.  Before making stew, cook beans.  Mash and make into paste.  Cook potatoes and onions with reserved meat stock until tender in a roaster.  Mash the potatoes, leaving them lumpy.  



Day 2



2 cans lima beans, drained

2 cans cream style white corn

1 small bottle ketchup

1/2 bottle Worcestershire sauce

1 teaspoon crushed red pepper

Salt and Pepper to taste



Add all of the ingredients above to the broth, potatoes, onions, chicken and meats.



8 large cans tomatoes



Crush tomatoes and add to stew.  Stew for 30 minutes to an hour or as Grandma used to say "until it looks like Brunswick stew".





Whoa, that looks like a little bit of work.  But if it is from Grandma Brown (I'm assuming your grandma knew what she was doing), I think I'll try to make this for Christmas.  It actually does sound hearty as hell. I won't have that big of an army, but I can probably cut everything in half and be good.  Who knows, maybe I could start a new family tradition?



Thanks for posting that. I've always wanted to try it.



 
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 8:06:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/14/2013 8:09:28 PM EDT by gomulego]
I pass through holmes county quite a bit and every time I do, I always stop to pick up some trail bologna. Well, that and some cheese too.



ETA: Meant to quote Tim_The_Enchanter



"At our family gatherings, you will always find an appetizer plate of
Trail bologna, and cheese. It's a regional Amish sausage made in Holmes
county, Ohio, in the village of Trail. It's not distributed outside of
Ohio. It's so localized that my friends in the northwest part of the
state have never heard of it. A similar sausage would be Lebanon
bologna, from Lebanon, Pa. It's served in bite sized slices or chunks,
with similar sized pieces of cheese."
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 8:07:29 PM EDT
Country ham

Biscuits with red eye gravy

Cheese grits

Venison sausage

Venison tenderloin
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 8:16:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/14/2013 8:18:11 PM EDT by Sgt_Fish]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gomulego:
I've heard about Brunswick stew and I've heard it's good. but I don't think I've ever had it. Would any old internet recipe work or is there a secret to it? I'd be interested in trying to make it.
 
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gomulego:
Originally Posted By Sgt_Fish:
Brunswick stew and pimento cheese sandwiches on Christmas Eve
Breakfast casserole, deer sausage, grits and eggs on Christmas morning.

I've heard about Brunswick stew and I've heard it's good. but I don't think I've ever had it. Would any old internet recipe work or is there a secret to it? I'd be interested in trying to make it.
 


I used this recipe from a BBQ joint in St. Simons Ga

Sapps Southern BBQ

Here are the changes I made:
1/2 pound salted butter
3 cups (2 large) finely diced sweet onions
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon salt
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup vinegar bbq sauce (recommended: Sapp Southern Soul Barbeque North Carolina)
1/2 cup brown sweet bbq sauce (recommended: Sapp Southern Soul Barbeque Georgia)
1 3 pounds smoked pulled pork
1/2 pound smoked pulled chicken
1/2 pound smoked pulled turkey
1 pound smoked chopped beef brisket

1 (number 10) can crushed tomatoes
1 quart 15oz can drained yellow corn kernels
1 quart drained baby lima beans
1 quart or more quality chicken stock or broth

I also added this:
1/2 cup ketchup
3 cups of diced potatoes
and

A tube of frozen creamed corned absolutely made this perfect.
DO NOT USE CANNED CREAM CORN, IT IS CRAP!!!
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 8:26:51 PM EDT
My Mom always makes Sweedish meatballs and a cheese ball.  It's all I have ever know so it is traditional to me.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 8:50:53 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gomulego:
Whoa, that looks like a little bit of work.  But if it is from Grandma Brown (I'm assuming your grandma knew what she was doing), I think I'll try to make this for Christmas.  It actually does sound hearty as hell. I won't have that big of an army, but I can probably cut everything in half and be good.  Who knows, maybe I could start a new family tradition?

Thanks for posting that. I've always wanted to try it.
 
View Quote


Well, it's from "a" Grandma Brown, but not my grandma Brown.  She has some other fun recipes, but she's still alive.  I have no idea who's grandma this is....it's kind of a large extended family.

Let me know if you like it.  If you do, I might give it a try myself.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 10:57:01 PM EDT
Nayarit-style tamales.  PITA to make, though, but so good...
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 12:26:53 AM EDT
For Thanksgiving, we usually have a traditional turkey dinner. Christmas, though, mom tries to changes things up, and each year will have a different food theme.

The last few years, as I can remember them: Italian, Mexican, English, French, Japanese (catered by a sushi place owned by some Japanese immigrant family friends, thank God), German, and, most recently, Chinese (real Chinese, not New York Chinese).

For those countries with a historically majority-Christian population, we didn't make their Christmas meals, but rather everyday foods (except for the year we did English, my sister made a Beef Wellington that was insanely delicious).
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 12:35:01 AM EDT
Not really regional, but gwumpkies

That's not how its actually spelled, but...
basically cabbage leaves boiled in some vinegar and water stuffed with rice, beef, and onions and baked

Skip the god damn tomato sauce, because we aren't savages here
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 1:01:34 AM EDT
My mom made a cheeseball which is a BIG hit but she will not give out the recipe b/c it's a goddamned secret. She got a recipe out of a cooking magazine in the 90's and tweaked it. But, b/c she added "original ingredients", it's a fucking secret.  She also made an awesome cornbread dressing, that braided jewish bread that sounds like something nasty caught in your throat when you say it (don't ask me why the fuck she started making that, no Jewish in our background that I know of), sausage balls, and stuffed mushrooms that taste like they come from Red Lobster.


I attempted the cheeseball for the first time this past Thanksgiving, going from my memory. I liked it, it was not prefect but it was damn close. No one else in my house eats cornbread dressing, so I never make it. I do make sausage balls as an appetizer. I do not know how to make the Jewish braided bread and that's fine. I remember it being a lot of work. I am going to look up the recipe for the stuffed mushrooms.

I do not make giblet gravy.  That shit is nasty. The cats get the turkey bits we do not cook and eat.

My bestie makes homemade lasagna for Christmas b/c she is half Italian. She also makes about a dozen different pies and her MIL makes almost 20 different vegetables for the big holiday suppers. Those 2 put on a feast!
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 10:00:46 AM EDT


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DieselEngineer:



I LOVE finnan haddie.  There is one restaurant that does it and cornbread really well in Buzzard's Bay, MA.  It is incredibly difficult to find, though.





Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
View Quote



Typically it really IS difficult to find and in fact almost impossible without importing it directly from Scotland (and you better do that way in advance of the holidays).  However, a few years ago I discovered a Scottish trained master smoker in ME (he moved there from Scotland and brought a smoker with him) that I am convinced is even better at it than our previous suppliers from Scotland.  He gets his haddock out the north Atlantic and smokes it immediately and he really has it down to a science.  Not only that but he is a really nice guy and very easy to deal with and he is basically right in your back yard. Give him a shot. I'd bet you could still get some for Christmas





here is his website ->   http://www.stoningtonseafood.com
 
 
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 10:05:13 AM EDT
I usually abuse a goose.
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 10:13:47 AM EDT
Perogi. Kokachi. Nom, nom, nom.
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 10:31:40 AM EDT
Whatever we happen to have on hand that day usually.
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 10:41:36 AM EDT
Usually the same as Thanksgiving, turkey, prime rib, ham, etc.
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 10:59:56 AM EDT
Always oyster stew on Christmas eve, and usually prime rib on Christmas.
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 11:18:27 AM EDT
Growing up it was always a ham for Christmas. Baked beans, green beans, mashed potatoes, gravy and rolls. The ham would be baked the day before and we would have sandwiches and mixed fruit on Christmas Eve when we did the gift opening after we got older. It was a great time and brings back good memories. My wife comments on how good those times were, things changed after dad died but the wife and I still stayed true and would go to moms on Christmas eve and day. A tradition we do at our house to this day and will do this year also.
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 12:34:37 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By fishorwife:
I had a  Stollen today. If you are German decent you will know the goodness.
View Quote


Even if you're not a decent German you will appreciate Stöllen!  Frohe Weihnachten!
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 12:38:50 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By WindKnot1-1:


Even if you're not a decent German you will appreciate Stöllen!  Frohe Weihnachten!
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By WindKnot1-1:
Originally Posted By fishorwife:
I had a  Stollen today. If you are German decent you will know the goodness.


Even if you're not a decent German you will appreciate Stöllen!  Frohe Weihnachten!


Thanks for reminding me of the Rindsrouladen recipe that was posted here.  

Prost!  
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 12:50:43 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TheYellowThing:


Thanks for reminding me of the Rindsrouladen recipe that was posted here.  

Prost!  
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TheYellowThing:
Originally Posted By WindKnot1-1:
Originally Posted By fishorwife:
I had a  Stollen today. If you are German decent you will know the goodness.


Even if you're not a decent German you will appreciate Stöllen!  Frohe Weihnachten!


Thanks for reminding me of the Rindsrouladen recipe that was posted here.  

Prost!  

Aldi sells that.
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 12:59:08 PM EDT
We always do seafood gumbo on Christmas Eve night.  Seems to be a tradition on the Gulf Coast.
Top Top