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Posted: 3/15/2011 5:19:13 PM EST
I've been wondering about a couple things lately. Why is it that Dodge, and Ford give payload ratings/ton designators like this DR 1500, 2500, 3500, Ford 150, 250, 350 etc. I know a ton is 2000 pounds and none of these numbers match up to what the trucks are called. Ie 1500 is considered a half ton, 2500 is 3/4 ton, and 3500 =1 ton. Based upon that system one would think that the models would be 1/2 ton= Dodge Ram 1000, 3/4 ton Dodge Ram 1500, and 1 ton = Dodge Ram 2000.


Lastly, say I have a 1/2 ton pickup how much can I really put in there (the bed).
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 5:23:29 PM EST
Originally Posted By Chromekilla:
I've been wondering about a couple things lately. Why is it that Dodge, and Ford give payload ratings/ton designators like this DR 1500, 2500, 3500, Ford 150, 250, 350 etc. I know a ton is 2000 pounds and none of these numbers match up to what the trucks are called. Ie 1500 is considered a half ton, 2500 is 3/4 ton, and 3500 =1 ton. Based upon that system one would think that the models would be 1/2 ton= Dodge Ram 1000, 3/4 ton Dodge Ram 1500, and 1 ton = Dodge Ram 2000.


Lastly, say I have a 1/2 ton pickup how much can I really put in there (the bed).


As much as you want but if you want it to move it will have more to do with what's under the hood.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 5:25:09 PM EST
Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:
Originally Posted By Chromekilla:
I've been wondering about a couple things lately. Why is it that Dodge, and Ford give payload ratings/ton designators like this DR 1500, 2500, 3500, Ford 150, 250, 350 etc. I know a ton is 2000 pounds and none of these numbers match up to what the trucks are called. Ie 1500 is considered a half ton, 2500 is 3/4 ton, and 3500 =1 ton. Based upon that system one would think that the models would be 1/2 ton= Dodge Ram 1000, 3/4 ton Dodge Ram 1500, and 1 ton = Dodge Ram 2000.


Lastly, say I have a 1/2 ton pickup how much can I really put in there (the bed).


As much as you want but if you want it to move it will have more to do with what's under the hood.


Say I had a 5.9 cummins diesel swapped into my 1500 I could move it (not considering the trq busting the axles) I could move say 1 ton in the back?
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 5:27:01 PM EST
Originally Posted By Chromekilla:
Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:
Originally Posted By Chromekilla:
I've been wondering about a couple things lately. Why is it that Dodge, and Ford give payload ratings/ton designators like this DR 1500, 2500, 3500, Ford 150, 250, 350 etc. I know a ton is 2000 pounds and none of these numbers match up to what the trucks are called. Ie 1500 is considered a half ton, 2500 is 3/4 ton, and 3500 =1 ton. Based upon that system one would think that the models would be 1/2 ton= Dodge Ram 1000, 3/4 ton Dodge Ram 1500, and 1 ton = Dodge Ram 2000.


Lastly, say I have a 1/2 ton pickup how much can I really put in there (the bed).


As much as you want but if you want it to move it will have more to do with what's under the hood.


Say I had a 5.9 cummins diesel swapped into my 1500 I could move it (not considering the trq busting the axles) I could move say 1 ton in the back?


It would handle a ton. A half ton truck will usually carry way more than a half ton. Closer to a ton. But a half ton truck is light duty. You shouldn't be using it constantly for that. You gotta get a 3/4 or 1 ton to carry and haul shit all the time. So, I've been told.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 5:29:31 PM EST
1 ton is not very much weight. I don't think you would have a problem.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 5:30:57 PM EST
Originally Posted By Molotov357:
1 ton is not very much weight. I don't think you would have a problem.


Thanks to you both. I've really wondered why the model designators were chosen and what exactly they meant. I got a Dodge Ram 1500 and a Ford F250HD which had f350 springs in it so I think I am good.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 5:31:14 PM EST
The F-150/1500 etc has nothing to do with an actual weight.

Each truck will have its own rating due to differences in suspension, GVWR, cab and bed config, etc.

"1/2 ton, 3/4 ton" etc is just a guideline for similar trucks.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 5:31:37 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/15/2011 5:45:23 PM EST by Kota4bye]
Originally Posted By Chromekilla:
Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:
Originally Posted By Chromekilla:
I've been wondering about a couple things lately. Why is it that Dodge, and Ford give payload ratings/ton designators like this DR 1500, 2500, 3500, Ford 150, 250, 350 etc. I know a ton is 2000 pounds and none of these numbers match up to what the trucks are called. Ie 1500 is considered a half ton, 2500 is 3/4 ton, and 3500 =1 ton. Based upon that system one would think that the models would be 1/2 ton= Dodge Ram 1000, 3/4 ton Dodge Ram 1500, and 1 ton = Dodge Ram 2000.


Lastly, say I have a 1/2 ton pickup how much can I really put in there (the bed).


As much as you want but if you want it to move it will have more to do with what's under the hood.


Say I had a 5.9 cummins diesel swapped into my 1500 I could move it (not considering the trq busting the axles) I could move say 1 ton in the back?


A quick google tells me that a 2011 Chevy 2500HD can haul 4,192 lbs of payload.

Model designators are just that.


Link Posted: 3/15/2011 5:49:08 PM EST
2006 Dodge Ram 1500 quad cab = 1750lbs payload.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 5:55:04 PM EST
Even more confusing when they have 150/1500 HD models. Company I work for went form Chevy 1500 vans to Ford 1500 HD vans that I believe have a 3300lb. capacity.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 6:00:35 PM EST
My F150 4X4 with a 5.4 liter will haul a ton, though it squats a bit and the front end floats some. I could probably go a little more than that.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 6:01:09 PM EST
Class 1= Dodge 1500, GM 1500, Ford 150. Max GVWR 6,000 lbs.
Class 2= Dodge and GM 2500 and F-250 6,001-10,000 GVWR
Class 3= Dodge/ GM 3500 and F-350 10,001-14,000 GVWR
Class 4= Dodge/GM 4500 and F-450 14,001-16,000 GVWR
Class5= Dodge/GM 5500 and F-550 16,001-19,500 GVWR
Class6 = Medium duty trucks 19,501-26,000 GVWR
Class 7= Heavy duty trucks 26,001-33,000 GVWR
Class8= Heavy duty trucks 33,001lbs and up GVWR.



And that what the model numbers of your pickup mean.

Link Posted: 3/15/2011 6:09:57 PM EST
Back to the top for educational purposes.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 6:23:55 PM EST
Designators from the old days. Beds were small for a reason.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 6:37:53 PM EST
Originally Posted By captexas:
Even more confusing when they have 150/1500 HD models. Company I work for went form Chevy 1500 vans to Ford 1500 HD vans that I believe have a 3300lb. capacity.


+1.

Ford used to also make a F250 light duty which looked just like a regular F150 except for 250 badges. Then I believe they changed it to the "F150 7700" package, so instead of F250 badges it had F150 with the 7700 designation.

Link Posted: 3/15/2011 6:44:44 PM EST
The 150 250 350 thing is the class (1-8) of the truck.

Max payload for a 2011 F350 is 7070 pounds.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 6:56:48 PM EST
Originally Posted By GATITO:
Designators from the old days. Beds were small for a reason.


This...

It got the name from pickup manufacturers refering to the maximum payload of the vehicle back in the day. It used to be that a 1/2 ton truck could carry 1000lbs over its weight, a 3/4 ton could carry 1500lbs, etc... This was based on axle and suspension ratings.

I know chevrolets or GMCs used to have the designation on their trucks as C/K10/20/30 and the Fords had something like F100/200. I guess they used the base model as 10 or 100 and instead of going to 15 and 20, they went to 20/30.

They changed to the 1500/2500/3500 as just an updated nomenclature and marketing. As far as I can tell there is no real reason for it. It would make no sense to constantly change the numbers based on yearly changes in payload capacity.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 7:02:01 PM EST
I put loads in pickups all day long. If we put anything near 1500 lbs in a 1/2 ton truck it really loads the suspension. 1000 lbs is about the most I would put in my '07 Dodge 1500 and feel safe. Other than the load on the suspension, you do have to take braking into consideration. My truck is equipped with bigger brakes for towing, but most 1/2 tons are not.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 7:08:33 PM EST
An sr25 doesn't hold 10 more than an sr15, what's the deal?

Also, why won't my p226 hold 26?

Jesus dude, it's a model number, not a molar designation.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 7:34:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/15/2011 8:38:19 PM EST by Bogie]
Gotta go by GVWR My 84 Dodge W350 is 6K on the scales with a 9600 Lb GVWR
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 7:57:48 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/15/2011 7:58:06 PM EST by barrysuperhawk]
Originally Posted By Cole2534:
An sr25 doesn't hold 10 more than an sr15, what's the deal?

Also, why won't my p226 hold 26?

Jesus dude, it's a model number, not a molar designation.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


I have 11 round mags for my 1911 and 17 round mags for my glock 17...

Link Posted: 3/15/2011 10:59:59 PM EST
Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:
Originally Posted By Chromekilla:
I've been wondering about a couple things lately. Why is it that Dodge, and Ford give payload ratings/ton designators like this DR 1500, 2500, 3500, Ford 150, 250, 350 etc. I know a ton is 2000 pounds and none of these numbers match up to what the trucks are called. Ie 1500 is considered a half ton, 2500 is 3/4 ton, and 3500 =1 ton. Based upon that system one would think that the models would be 1/2 ton= Dodge Ram 1000, 3/4 ton Dodge Ram 1500, and 1 ton = Dodge Ram 2000.


Lastly, say I have a 1/2 ton pickup how much can I really put in there (the bed).


As much as you want but if you want it to move it will have more to do with what's under the hood.


Good luck with that.

Go down to the local dealer, look under the trucks, and compare the leaf springs in the back of a 1500/150 to a 2500/250.

Not to mention that you get some extra goodies with the 2500/3500 series (bigger frame, bigger brakes, bigger tranny, bigger rear end, full floating rear axles, lower gears, tranny cooler, oil cooler, power steering cooler, Load range "E" tires, etc).

Any truck will move more than it's rated capacity, but you shouldn't do it.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 11:10:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By Chromekilla:
Originally Posted By Molotov357:
1 ton is not very much weight. I don't think you would have a problem.


Thanks to you both. I've really wondered why the model designators were chosen and what exactly they meant. I got a Dodge Ram 1500 and a Ford F250HD which had f350 springs in it so I think I am good.


You'll want to use the F250 for a 1 ton load. It'll really make that 1/2 ton truck squat terribly.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 11:35:31 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/16/2011 3:37:50 PM EST by AJSully421]
I had a guy once tell me that it was something like:

1500 = "half ton truck" in that it will haul 1/2 ton in the bed, plus the driver, passengers and fuel = approx 1500 pounds pf total useful load... or so he said.

His "theory" went to hell once you toss in the 2500 and 3500 numbers. I think this guy was misinformed or full of crap.

OP, I once hauled a 1,850 pound pallet of grass sod in the back of my sierra 1500 2wd and while the trailer hitch was about to drag the ground, I made it the three miles home without a single issue. So, I know for a fact that you can put that much weight in the back. I would certainly not do that every day, but it can be done.

Ignore the numbers.
Link Posted: 3/16/2011 9:56:51 AM EST
Originally Posted By BuckHammer:
Originally Posted By Chromekilla:
Originally Posted By Molotov357:
1 ton is not very much weight. I don't think you would have a problem.


Thanks to you both. I've really wondered why the model designators were chosen and what exactly they meant. I got a Dodge Ram 1500 and a Ford F250HD which had f350 springs in it so I think I am good.


You'll want to use the F250 for a 1 ton load. It'll really make that 1/2 ton truck squat terribly.


I am running air bags and helper springs from f350 under the rear.
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