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Posted: 9/17/2009 3:46:52 AM EST
I'd like to extend my most sincere and humble feelings of gratitude to you.

Every person in this country, whether they choose to acknowledge it or not, owes you the same thanks and respect.

As a tight-knit group, you "pat each other on the back" all the time, as you should. However, it seems that you are only honored, or noticed by the mainstream media in times of victory or defeat.


I want you to know that this is not indicative of how we at home value you.


You are thought of day in and day out, on our way to work, when we get a minute to think during the day and at night, as we appreciate our loved ones and the way in which we live.

There is no "Veterans Day" for us, for we pay homage to you every minute of our free lives. There is no particular occasion once a year in which you should feel appreciated and proud, but rather every day, all year, for you're entire lives.

Today is September 17th, and like any other day of the year, we recognize that all of you gave everything you could, and some of you gave everything you'd ever have.

Please accept my most heartfelt thanks, and please- if any of you are in touch with any families of fallen soldiers, let them know that their sons and daughters have truly made our lives better here at home.


Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:52:33 AM EST
thanks.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:53:03 AM EST
It was my honor.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 3:59:47 AM EST
It was a great experience
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:03:06 AM EST
a one second thank you is worth a thousand deployments
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:06:38 AM EST
Originally Posted By beernut:
It was a great experience


This. If it was possible, I'd do it again.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:13:00 AM EST

Originally Posted By Outlander3:
a one second thank you is worth a thousand deployments

I don't think i'd go that far!

But yes, acknowledgments and thank you's are much appreciated. So thank you for your thank you, and thank you to all the others who serve/served.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:19:51 AM EST
I too give thanks every day. Usually on my commute to work. I especially like it when I see home made signs (usually spray painted bed sheets) saying "Welcome home from Iraq (insert name here)". Extra prayers go out when there's a "we missed you Dad" written on it.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:22:24 AM EST
Thank you!


A handshake and a simple thank you, means more than most will probably ever know.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:22:51 AM EST
Originally Posted By DuraToTheMax:
I'd like to extend my most sincere and humble feelings of gratitude to you.

Every person in this country, whether they choose to acknowledge it or not, owes you the same thanks and respect.

As a tight-knit group, you "pat each other on the back" all the time, as you should. However, it seems that you are only honored, or noticed by the mainstream media in times of victory or defeat.


I want you to know that this is not indicative of how we at home value you.


You are thought of day in and day out, on our way to work, when we get a minute to think during the day and at night, as we appreciate our loved ones and the way in which we live.

There is no "Veterans Day" for us, for we pay homage to you every minute of our free lives. There is no particular occasion once a year in which you should feel appreciated and proud, but rather every day, all year, for you're entire lives.

Today is September 17th, and like any other day of the year, we recognize that all of you gave everything you could, and some of you gave everything you'd ever have.

Please accept my most heartfelt thanks, and please- if any of you are in touch with any families of fallen soldiers, let them know that their sons and daughters have truly made our lives better here at home.








Great post and the way I feel as well.


Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:23:22 AM EST
On behalf of myself, brother, father, uncle, two grandfathers and dozens of my ancestors going back to 1861 (and possibly beyond) "Thanks".

I wish I could do it over and a bit differently but I have no real regrets other than rotating out to soon.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:32:19 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 4:33:47 AM EST by Furious]
Sitting here surrounded by other soldiers talking to their families back home and counting every day until we see them again. I watched one of my friends get medivaced this morning. Eating crap and sleeping with rats and God knows what else....It feels really good ever time I see a post like this.

Thank you for supporting us. Not everyone back in the US does. They spit on us in airports. They follow our funerals with protest signs and they blame us for the wars we fight in. They just dont get it that Washington decides where we go, what we do. We're just soldiers. We do what we're told. We stand up for our country and we love you all.

Posts like this and people sending care packages are the reason I love this website. It feels so good to know that a normal citizen actually understands and support what we do.

God bless you all, Furious







45 more days and I'm comin home!!!!
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:32:29 AM EST
Thanks.

I still miss it sometimes.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:32:37 AM EST
That's kind of you to write that. BUT...
No one needs to kiss my ass because I served.(4 years,Honorable Discharge)
There was NO draft, just NO jobs.(1983).

I think military service is a good thing to do, I just don't agree with the "mythos" and "hero worship" that many who have not served, throw at the feet of those of us who have.

Think about this: How hard is it really to enlist,do basic,and "cycle through" 2,3,or 4 years of peacetime military service? Sure, there are some difficult,and challenging times. That's part of the package.

Then, they (US Govt.) schedual a war. Surprise! Now you fight a war you may(or may not) believe in. IMHO 99% then do there very best,and most don't re-enlist. They get out while there ass is still in one piece.

Wartime service maybe very dangerious. That's not exactly a newsflash. But how many actually fight? For every Infantryman there are about 11 others supporting them. A small amount will become "posers". A very small amount will do somthing heroic. Most just do there job.

Military service is a good "rubber stamp" on one's resume, but not the "be all,end all" that some make it out to be.

Thank you for your post, I just have a different perspective.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:36:27 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:39:12 AM EST
If I was 17 again and thinking about joining the Army..........



I'd do it again in a heartbeat.



Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:42:15 AM EST
Originally Posted By DuraToTheMax:
I'd like to extend my most sincere and humble feelings of gratitude to you.

Every person in this country, whether they choose to acknowledge it or not, owes you the same thanks and respect.

As a tight-knit group, you "pat each other on the back" all the time, as you should. However, it seems that you are only honored, or noticed by the mainstream media in times of victory or defeat.


I want you to know that this is not indicative of how we at home value you.


You are thought of day in and day out, on our way to work, when we get a minute to think during the day and at night, as we appreciate our loved ones and the way in which we live.

There is no "Veterans Day" for us, for we pay homage to you every minute of our free lives. There is no particular occasion once a year in which you should feel appreciated and proud, but rather every day, all year, for you're entire lives.

Today is September 17th, and like any other day of the year, we recognize that all of you gave everything you could, and some of you gave everything you'd ever have.

Please accept my most heartfelt thanks, and please- if any of you are in touch with any families of fallen soldiers, let them know that their sons and daughters have truly made our lives better here at home.




Amen. Very well put.

Thank you to all our service members working to keep us safe.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:47:39 AM EST
Thanks, best experience of my life
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:47:44 AM EST
13 years so far..... 29 to go! it is my honor.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:52:56 AM EST
I enlisted in the Navy right out of high school, 1977.
If I had the chance to do it over again I believe I would have joined the Marine Corp.
Not that I didn't enjoy the Navy, but I didn't feel as if I really made a difference.

Your welcome just the same.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:53:22 AM EST
Cheers.

Born into the military. Grew up with the military. Lived it, breathed it, served it, and loved it. My whole family served in the military. I have two brothers still currently serving.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:53:48 AM EST

Originally Posted By Furious:
Sitting here surrounded by other soldiers talking to their families back home and counting every day until we see them again. I watched one of my friends get medivaced this morning. Eating crap and sleeping with rats and God knows what else....It feels really good ever time I see a post like this.

Thank you for supporting us. Not everyone back in the US does. They spit on us in airports. They follow our funerals with protest signs and they blame us for the wars we fight in. They just dont get it that Washington decides where we go, what we do. We're just soldiers. We do what we're told. We stand up for our country and we love you all.

Posts like this and people sending care packages are the reason I love this website. It feels so good to know that a normal citizen actually understands and support what we do.

God bless you all, Furious

45 more days and I'm comin home!!!!

I really hope you don't let those idiots affect you. Like I said, even they owe you guys for your service, they're just too stupid to realize it.

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:56:12 AM EST
Thank you .



It does mean alot.



Gene
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:56:38 AM EST

Originally Posted By Breaker83:
That's kind of you to write that. BUT...
No one needs to kiss my ass because I served.(4 years,Honorable Discharge)
There was NO draft, just NO jobs.(1983).

I think military service is a good thing to do, I just don't agree with the "mythos" and "hero worship" that many who have not served, throw at the feet of those of us who have.

Think about this: How hard is it really to enlist,do basic,and "cycle through" 2,3,or 4 years of peacetime military service? Sure, there are some difficult,and challenging times. That's part of the package.

Then, they (US Govt.) schedual a war. Surprise! Now you fight a war you may(or may not) believe in. IMHO 99% then do there very best,and most don't re-enlist. They get out while there ass is still in one piece.

Wartime service maybe very dangerious. That's not exactly a newsflash. But how many actually fight? For every Infantryman there are about 11 others supporting them. A small amount will become "posers". A very small amount will do somthing heroic. Most just do there job.

Military service is a good "rubber stamp" on one's resume, but not the "be all,end all" that some make it out to be.

Thank you for your post, I just have a different perspective.

I'm not kissing your ass, I'm just thanking you for your service.

I don't care what your motivation to join was, all I know is that if you must, you will go into battle for our country.

Regardless of whether or not you are on the front, you are part of the effort, while I sit here at home.

For that reason, I thank you.

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 5:00:35 AM EST
I consider it a privilege and an honor to have served. No thanks necessary.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 5:04:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 5:17:58 AM EST by Intune69]
Originally Posted By Breaker83:
That's kind of you to write that. BUT...
No one needs to kiss my ass because I served.(4 years,Honorable Discharge)
There was NO draft, just NO jobs.(1983).

I think military service is a good thing to do, I just don't agree with the "mythos" and "hero worship" that many who have not served, throw at the feet of those of us who have.

Think about this: How hard is it really to enlist,do basic,and "cycle through" 2,3,or 4 years of peacetime military service? Sure, there are some difficult,and challenging times. That's part of the package.

Then, they (US Govt.) schedual a war. Surprise! Now you fight a war you may(or may not) believe in. IMHO 99% then do there very best,and most don't re-enlist. They get out while there ass is still in one piece.

Wartime service maybe very dangerious. That's not exactly a newsflash. But how many actually fight? For every Infantryman there are about 11 others supporting them. A small amount will become "posers". A very small amount will do somthing heroic. Most just do there job.

Military service is a good "rubber stamp" on one's resume, but not the "be all,end all" that some make it out to be.

Thank you for your post, I just have a different perspective.

Edited for civility.
Why? Why post your shitty perspective? Start a new thread.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 5:04:52 AM EST
Thank you, i wish i would have done more though.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 5:05:30 AM EST
Uncle Sugar thanked me twice a month for 24 years and now thanks me once a month for the rest of my life. I hope to make him pay for a VERY long time.
I do appreciate your sentiments though.
S/F
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 5:06:24 AM EST
Soldier Medic
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 5:15:42 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 5:15:57 AM EST by Papi4baby]
I had some shitty moments.

But also had great experience. Would do it again if i had to.

And, anytime.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 5:21:22 AM EST
Thank you very much
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 5:22:21 AM EST
Originally Posted By Texkaw:
Originally Posted By beernut:
It was a great experience


This. If it was possible, I'd do it again.


This...+10000
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 5:30:11 AM EST

Originally Posted By knucklehead:
I enlisted in the Navy right out of high school, 1977.
If I had the chance to do it over again I believe I would have joined the Marine Corp.
Not that I didn't enjoy the Navy, but I didn't feel as if I really made a difference.

Your welcome just the same.

You made a bigger difference than most Americans.

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 5:53:51 AM EST


Thanks mate!

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 6:03:16 AM EST
Originally Posted By Intune69:
Originally Posted By Breaker83:
That's kind of you to write that. BUT...
No one needs to kiss my ass because I served.(4 years,Honorable Discharge)
There was NO draft, just NO jobs.(1983).

I think military service is a good thing to do, I just don't agree with the "mythos" and "hero worship" that many who have not served, throw at the feet of those of us who have.

Think about this: How hard is it really to enlist,do basic,and "cycle through" 2,3,or 4 years of peacetime military service? Sure, there are some difficult,and challenging times. That's part of the package.

Then, they (US Govt.) schedual a war. Surprise! Now you fight a war you may(or may not) believe in. IMHO 99% then do there very best,and most don't re-enlist. They get out while there ass is still in one piece.

Wartime service maybe very dangerious. That's not exactly a newsflash. But how many actually fight? For every Infantryman there are about 11 others supporting them. A small amount will become "posers". A very small amount will do somthing heroic. Most just do there job.

Military service is a good "rubber stamp" on one's resume, but not the "be all,end all" that some make it out to be.

Thank you for your post, I just have a different perspective.

Edited for civility.
Why? Why post your shitty perspective? Start a new thread.



Because that's basically the reason threads start in the first place, is to elicit responses.

His response was on topic, and I share his basic view. USMC infantry, '82-'86.




Link Posted: 9/17/2009 6:38:27 AM EST
Thank you

But I was just doing my part to keep us free.


To all the Vietnam Vets out there

THANK YOU
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 6:38:27 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 6:39:21 AM EST by Mr_Harry]
double post
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 6:49:13 AM EST
You're welcome, and thanks for remembering. I just wonder how that hippy that spit on me at the Denver airport in 1974 is doing these days...
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 6:57:31 AM EST
Originally Posted By Dilbert_556:
You're welcome, and thanks for remembering. I just wonder how that hippy that spit on me at the Denver airport in 1974 is doing these days...




I got spit on at Logan about the same time.

A couple years ago I got my pound of flesh (and my parade of sorts) en route to Camp Perry.


Oddly enough, this former soldier thanks the Marines for setting it up for me.




Link Posted: 9/17/2009 6:59:29 AM EST
Originally Posted By Texkaw:
Originally Posted By beernut:
It was a great experience


This. If it was possible, I'd do it again.



+1
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 7:01:54 AM EST
Originally Posted By piccolo:
Originally Posted By Dilbert_556:
You're welcome, and thanks for remembering. I just wonder how that hippy that spit on me at the Denver airport in 1974 is doing these days...




I got spit on at Logan about the same time.

A couple years ago I got my pound of flesh (and my parade of sorts) en route to Camp Perry.


Oddly enough, this former soldier thanks the Marines for setting it up for me.






I'd love to hear about it! I still wish I would've waded into that bastard when I had the chance; but I took the high road.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 7:09:15 AM EST
Originally Posted By Zoomer302:
I too give thanks every day. Usually on my commute to work. I especially like it when I see home made signs (usually spray painted bed sheets) saying "Welcome home from Iraq (insert name here)". Extra prayers go out when there's a "we missed you Dad" written on it.


Those freakin' things are up in my neighborhood all the stinkin' time! Hmm, maybe I should move out of housing?

It is a pleasure and an honor to have served with and for the best folks there be. Why no officer love btw? It's hard to be humble when you're a Mustang!
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 7:14:39 AM EST
Your welcome, it was both an honor and a privilege! I am a better man for having served.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 7:23:22 AM EST
Originally Posted By Dilbert_556:
Originally Posted By piccolo:
Originally Posted By Dilbert_556:
You're welcome, and thanks for remembering. I just wonder how that hippy that spit on me at the Denver airport in 1974 is doing these days...




I got spit on at Logan about the same time.

A couple years ago I got my pound of flesh (and my parade of sorts) en route to Camp Perry.


Oddly enough, this former soldier thanks the Marines for setting it up for me.






I'd love to hear about it! I still wish I would've waded into that bastard when I had the chance; but I took the high road.


I'm a rifle shooter, but I went to Perry that year for pistol school (SAFS-pistol)

As usual, I went to visit the Marine shooters and I mentioned to them that after I got spit on, I never wore a uniform off post again. A couple of the Marines told me to dig it out and wear it to the rifle matches.

At first, I figured it was a bet between two sergeants as to whether my uniform was going to be blue or gray, but they managed to talk me into it, anyway.

I posted about digging it out already, and when I left Pittsburgh for Perry, I had it with me. I changed into it in the can of my 1st rest stop.

Now, you have to remember, I was a SP/5, the rank hasn't existed since '80, and the khaki uniform hasn't been issued since '78.

I left the can looking starched and pressed and instantly a little boy came up to me and told me his Grandpa jumped into Normandy with the 101st.

An older biker type took one look at me and told me I looked good and he hasn't seen the uniform since 'Nam. He was pretty wound up about it, like Dennis Hopper gets in the movies. Then an older woman came up to me and asked when I served and when I told her, she looked at the ground and apologized for the way the public treated us.

I thought this was a fluke, and my curiosity got to me so I made a couple of other stops.

At the next stop, an Air Force officer with a big smile chewed me out for not saluting. What a gracious thing to do! We exchanged salutes and he went on his way with a huge grin.

On the way back to my car, I encountered some burnt out leftover from Woodstock with an unkempt head of shoulder hair, sandals and love beads. I swear, there were flies buzzing around him. He looked pretty rough, like he'd been beaten by an angry mob a while back., but I'd say it was too much LSD.

He changed course to avoid me, I changed course. I wanted to cross his path. Payback time.

Then I spit at his feet and said to him, "It's my turn, asshole. You had your turn and now it's mine."

The next stop was where I usually get my beer for Perry and as I got out, an old man got out of his pickup, walked up to me , shook my hand and thanked me for my service.

When I got my beer and put it in my truck, I realized that the chip I'd carried on my shoulder for 30+ years was gone.

As I pulled up to the Perry gate and started to reach for my ID, the guard said, "Don't bother, you're wearing your ID." Then he laughed. "First Sp/5 I've ever seen,"

I went straight to the Marine barracks to thank them.

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 7:37:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By piccolo:
Originally Posted By Dilbert_556:
Originally Posted By piccolo:
Originally Posted By Dilbert_556:
You're welcome, and thanks for remembering. I just wonder how that hippy that spit on me at the Denver airport in 1974 is doing these days...




I got spit on at Logan about the same time.

A couple years ago I got my pound of flesh (and my parade of sorts) en route to Camp Perry.


Oddly enough, this former soldier thanks the Marines for setting it up for me.






I'd love to hear about it! I still wish I would've waded into that bastard when I had the chance; but I took the high road.


I'm a rifle shooter, but I went to Perry that year for pistol school (SAFS-pistol)

As usual, I went to visit the Marine shooters and I mentioned to them that after I got spit on, I never wore a uniform off post again. A couple of the Marines told me to dig it out and wear it to the rifle matches.

At first, I figured it was a bet between two sergeants as to whether my uniform was going to be blue or gray, but they managed to talk me into it, anyway.

I posted about digging it out already, and when I left Pittsburgh for Perry, I had it with me. I changed into it in the can of my 1st rest stop.

Now, you have to remember, I was a SP/5, the rank hasn't existed since '80, and the khaki uniform hasn't been issued since '78.

I left the can looking starched and pressed and instantly a little boy came up to me and told me his Grandpa jumped into Normandy with the 101st.

An older biker type took one look at me and told me I looked good and he hasn't seen the uniform since 'Nam. He was pretty wound up about it, like Dennis Hopper gets in the movies. Then an older woman came up to me and asked when I served and when I told her, she looked at the ground and apologized for the way the public treated us.

I thought this was a fluke, and my curiosity got to me so I made a couple of other stops.

At the next stop, an Air Force officer with a big smile chewed me out for not saluting. What a gracious thing to do! We exchanged salutes and he went on his way with a huge grin.

On the way back to my car, I encountered some burnt out leftover from Woodstock with an unkempt head of shoulder hair, sandals and love beads. I swear, there were flies buzzing around him. He looked pretty rough, like he'd been beaten by an angry mob a while back., but I'd say it was too much LSD.

He changed course to avoid me, I changed course. I wanted to cross his path. Payback time.

Then I spit at his feet and said to him, "It's my turn, asshole. You had your turn and now it's mine."

The next stop was where I usually get my beer for Perry and as I got out, an old man got out of his pickup, walked up to me , shook my hand and thanked me for my service.

When I got my beer and put it in my truck, I realized that the chip I'd carried on my shoulder for 30+ years was gone.

As I pulled up to the Perry gate and started to reach for my ID, the guard said, "Don't bother, you're wearing your ID." Then he laughed. "First Sp/5 I've ever seen,"

I went straight to the Marine barracks to thank them.



Thanks for posting this piccolo, it helps.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 7:41:41 AM EST
Gratis and RIP to all who have fallen on all sides.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 7:58:24 AM EST
Originally Posted By Offspring:
Soldier Medic




Where? When?


Link Posted: 9/17/2009 8:01:13 AM EST
Been my pleasure. Thanks.

My thanks go to the law enforcement officers and firefighters as well.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 8:09:39 AM EST
Wouldn't change it for the world. Doing my duty is thanks enough but thanks for noticing.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 8:22:42 AM EST
i was in the army for 7 years and i got out two years ago.. there are times when i wish i would of stayed in.
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